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-   -   People who grew up at high elevation may be less susceptible to COVID-19 (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=1201801)

Shimagnolo 05-18-20 07:43 AM

People who grew up at high elevation may be less susceptible to COVID-19
 
https://www.summitdaily.com/news/peo...e-to-covid-19/

Zubieta-Calleja said a doctor would have to inject the hormone erythropoietin into a personís blood, which would stimulate the production of red blood cells.

Racing cyclists were just ahead of their time!:p

wgscott 05-18-20 09:05 AM


Originally Posted by Shimagnolo (Post 21481866)
https://www.summitdaily.com/news/peo...e-to-covid-19/

Zubieta-Calleja said a doctor would have to inject the hormone erythropoietin into a personís blood, which would stimulate the production of red blood cells.

Racing cyclists were just ahead of their time!:p

That's such a great idea, with people dropping like flies from clotting complications from the infection.

RubeRad 05-18-20 04:59 PM

Here's a Dr from NYC speculating that the covid19 patients he's seeing are looking more like altitude sickness than ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome?), and perhaps ventilators are the wrong approach

https://vimeo.com/402537849

Shimagnolo 05-18-20 06:01 PM


Originally Posted by RubeRad (Post 21483055)
Here's a Dr from NYC speculating that the covid19 patients he's seeing are looking more like altitude sickness than ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome?), and perhaps ventilators are the wrong approach

https://vimeo.com/402537849

Now this is interesting. So he is saying the problem is not the lungs, but in getting O2 into the bloodstream.
Here is a PDF file of a recent paper: Covid-19: acquired acute porphyria hypothesis
The theory is that porphyria, (a normally inherited disease), is being caused by the virus, interfering with the blood hemoglobin:

https://osf.io/4wkfy/download/?format=pdf

Biker395 05-18-20 06:41 PM


Originally Posted by Shimagnolo (Post 21483222)
Now this is interesting. So he is saying the problem is not the lungs, but in getting O2 into the bloodstream.
Here is a PDF file of a recent paper: Covid-19: acquired acute porphyria hypothesis
The theory is that porphyria, (a normally inherited disease), is being caused by the virus, interfering with the blood hemoglobin:

https://osf.io/4wkfy/download/?format=pdf

That sounds familiar. Wasn't there a debunked computer based study about a month ago that suggested that COVID was attacking blood hemoglobin?

Caveat: I know nothing of this other than they both involve a hemoglobin-based theory.

http://scholar.google.com/scholar_ur...=1&oi=scholarr

RubeRad 05-19-20 10:12 AM

porphyria is what caused The Madness of King George

RubeRad 05-19-20 10:14 AM

Maybe this altitude/EPO thing is significant, but that summitdaily article is more caveat than substance.

Scientists need to sink their teeth into this and other promising ideas. I'm sure they are.

CliffordK 05-19-20 10:37 AM

Interesting concept.

As one loses lung function, one becomes hypoxic (shortness of breath). There are a number of changes that can help including oxygen supplements (increasing O2 in the air from about 20% to about 100%), and eventually forcing more air into the lungs with a ventilator.

But, increasing RBCs (polycythemia) may also improve transport of oxygen to the cells.

A blood transfusion would be the easiest way to give a rapid, short-term increase in RBCs. Better yet, if one gets a whole blood transfusion that also contains the antibodies one needs.

wgscott 05-19-20 11:10 AM


Originally Posted by CliffordK (Post 21484555)
But, increasing RBCs (polycythemia) may also improve transport of oxygen to the cells.

A friend of mine who developed polycythemia vera found that he no longer got altitude sickness.

However, people who have polycythemia vera typically die from the blood clots. My friend has probably had a couple dozen stents put in over the years.

Given that we now know that massive blot clotting is one of the major sources of complications and death from SARS-CoV-2, administering EPO is quite possibly the worst way imaginable to increase oxygenation.

It does make me wonder if the clotting complications develop as a consequence of oxygen shortage -- i.e., the body cranks up its own production of EPO, and that in turn causes clotting? (This is merely speculative on my part.)

It might suggest suppressing natural over-expression of EPO could help prevent some of these complications.

RubeRad 05-19-20 11:53 AM

Or how about just blood doping? Extract your own blood, wait for it to replenish, and then reinject it: boom more red blood cells

CliffordK 05-19-20 12:02 PM


Originally Posted by wgscott (Post 21484650)
A friend of mine who developed polycythemia vera found that he no longer got altitude sickness.

However, people who have polycythemia vera typically die from the blood clots. My friend has probably had a couple dozen stents put in over the years.

Given that we now know that massive blot clotting is one of the major sources of complications and death from SARS-CoV-2, administering EPO is quite possibly the worst way imaginable to increase oxygenation.

It does make me wonder if the clotting complications develop as a consequence of oxygen shortage -- i.e., the body cranks up its own production of EPO, and that in turn causes clotting? (This is merely speculative on my part.)

It might suggest suppressing natural over-expression of EPO could help prevent some of these complications.

Good point about clotting. But, there may be target ranges of HCT that would improve oxygenation at minimal risk.

I had an acquaintance a few years ago with the polycythemia. he had regular blood-letting. But, he also chain smoked, and perhaps it was in part related to carbon monoxide.

indyfabz 05-19-20 12:32 PM

I spent a lot of my teens and some of my twenties high. Does that count for anything? :D


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