Bike Forums

Bike Forums (https://www.bikeforums.net/forum.php)
-   Coronavirus/COVID-19 (https://www.bikeforums.net/forumdisplay.php?f=341)
-   -   Were you prepared? (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=1196871)

TakingMyTime 03-29-20 09:49 AM

Were you prepared?
 
I am by no means a Prepper, but we keep our pantry well-stocked, and in case our water is ever cut off, we have an adequate supply of bottled water . As far as having food on-hand we are always well prepared.

I'm trying to use this experience as a learning tool. And what I've learned the most is that although we have enough food, we find ourselves always looking for something to snack on. Things like popcorn, mixed nuts and stuff like that. Although we don't have a external freezer out in our garage, it would be nice to have had some ice cream on hand too.

We have several sealed plastic containers out in the garage and after this is all over with I want to use one just for junk food. It really seems to help keep the natives from getting restless.

What will you have on-hand for the next pandemic?

Hondo Gravel 03-29-20 10:00 AM

Yes I am prepared :D Seriously though I have a bunch of canned goods like Chef BoyRD and lots of beans. Frozen foods etc. probably a months worth or longer. Not a picky eater so that is good.


https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...fa9929fd9.jpeg

FiftySix 03-29-20 10:07 AM

I'm not a prepper, but I've always believed in having enough supplies for at least 2 to 4 weeks. I usually stock up in the spring before hurricane season and eat up food surplus in the fall after hurricane season ends.

But this current situation is completely different.

308jerry 03-29-20 10:22 AM

Oh my.
​​​My first thought is how many on BF are going to come on here and call you OP selfish.... Me I'm well stocked and don't care what anyone sez....

Hondo Gravel 03-29-20 10:28 AM

I’m OK with supplies but if somebody needs something I will gladly share but not my last roll of TP ( kidding of course ) I believe people will help each other out.

skidder 03-29-20 10:43 AM

I live in Southern California, earthquake country. I've got about 4 weeks of stuff, but always concerned if I have enough water. Most is stored in an old refrigerator out in my garage ('fridge doesn't work anymore, but its a great, tough storage box).

Juan Foote 03-29-20 10:47 AM

I have to admit that this whole situation caught me a bit unprepared. I used to keep a good week or two of food in the house all the time. We made a swap to fresh vegetables and unprocessed meats and foods a couple of years ago. Especially with the vegetables and fruits it works best with a 3 day turnaround, back to the store. We had gotten to where we would keep a couple of days worth of fresh food in the house instead of canned and whatnot. This happening was the first time I can recall in years that I have actually purchased canned vegetables. Haven't brought myself to open any of them yet.

noisebeam 03-29-20 11:22 AM

No. Missing a few key items. Family went for 2wk backpacking trip in early thru mid march and stocked up for that and when we came back can't find some items in stores. Like yeast. Now I can't make bread, pizza, rolls, etc all which I used to make weekly. Just happened to run out of the jar that usually last a month and didn't think about it. Obviously not an essential. We consciously didn't hoard when shopping for the backpacking trip as we thought it was anti social, now finding it hard to get TP and sanitizers have second thoughts.

chewybrian 03-29-20 12:21 PM

I just got very lucky.

I don't have a car, so every couple months I get a big delivery of non-perishables. I just happened to place a large order a few days before the toilet paper wars began. Naturally, by dumb luck, I bought all the stuff that is difficult to get now (tp, paper towels, peanut butter, tuna and such) and I had a couple months worth of supplies ready to go.

prairiepedaler 03-29-20 12:37 PM

Once upon a time it was quite common to have a pantry full of foodstuffs, supplies and preserves enough for a family with 4 children for 6 months. No one called it "prepping" or other panic laden terms, it's just the way it was out of neccessity. Normal life and no stress element to it. Kind of like the standard existence of the old storm cellar for homes situated in Tornado alley. There is a real blessing to all this hype; many will begin to open their eyes about what is important in their lives and what isn't, and how this lack of self-sufficiency and reliance on things from far away needs to change.

wgscott 03-29-20 01:05 PM

We probably should have stocked up on more tire sealant. I had no idea the kid would want to change tires so freqeuntly mid-apocalypse.

Hondo Gravel 03-29-20 02:12 PM


Originally Posted by wgscott (Post 21389991)
We probably should have stocked up on more tire sealant. I had no idea the kid would want to change tires so freqeuntly mid-apocalypse.

:roflmao: My lawn tractor has a flat and I was thinking I need to get tire sealant! I do have some tire plugs I will survive.

coffeesnob 03-29-20 02:58 PM

We have enough TP for a couple of weeks. No bottled water, enough food to realistically last about 2 weeks or so. Plenty of coffee just short on lactose free creamer.

308jerry 03-29-20 03:11 PM

Probably should be asking yourselves, are you prepared for what's next? Sounds to me like we're all going to get CV 19, early, middle or late on the flat graph, but nobody is not going to get it. Symptoms will very....

FiftySix 03-29-20 03:45 PM


Originally Posted by 308jerry (Post 21390189)
Probably should be asking yourselves, are you prepared for what's next? Sounds to me like we're all going to get CV 19, early, middle or late on the flat graph, but nobody is not going to get it. Symptoms will very....

I have enough over the counter meds to possibly ease the symptoms of 1/2 our household, and our favorite urgent care clinic is less than 2 miles away with a pharmacy across the street from that. That will mean a real stuck-in-the-house quarantine for all four of us when that goes down, which means groceries, etc. should be delivered to our home. We'll see.

Riveting 03-29-20 04:02 PM

I always have a deep supply of Cliff Bars, Lara Bars, Luna Bars, Power Bars, Kind Bars, Quest Bars (my current favorite is the Maple Waffle), Power Gels, and GU packs...so I'm all set for at least a few weeks (of riding).

Hondo Gravel 03-29-20 04:10 PM


Originally Posted by Riveting (Post 21390252)
I always have a deep supply of Cliff Bars, Lara Bars, Luna Bars, Power Bars, Kind Bars, Quest Bars (my current favorite), Power Gels, and GU packs...so I'm all set for at least a few weeks (of riding).

Starting tomorrow Iím riding the gravel bike until this covid thing passes or I get infected. My gravel routes are void of people so that will keep me isolated. Information overload right now. I donít think anybody knows what is going to happen.

TakingMyTime 03-29-20 05:52 PM


Originally Posted by Riveting (Post 21390252)
I always have a deep supply of Cliff Bars, Lara Bars, Luna Bars, Power Bars, Kind Bars, Quest Bars (my current favorite is the Maple Waffle), Power Gels, and GU packs...so I'm all set for at least a few weeks (of riding).

That's sort of what I was originally posting about. I have a bit of a sweet tooth and it would be nice to have a variety of different candies in a storage bin. There's no way I'm hitting the 99 cent store just for candy right now. I'm not necessarily talking about the necessities, but those extra things that flew under the radar. I'm thinking of buying and storing a couple gallons of bleach and rubbing alcohol for the next time.

genec 03-30-20 02:57 AM


Originally Posted by skidder (Post 21389717)
I live in Southern California, earthquake country. I've got about 4 weeks of stuff, but always concerned if I have enough water. Most is stored in an old refrigerator out in my garage ('fridge doesn't work anymore, but its a great, tough storage box).

Having long been a west coaster, we typically keep cases of canned goods and cases of water, as well bags of beans and rice... the big secret is to constantly rotate that stock, so nothing gets too old.

We could typically go about a month, and have stored propane for cooking... should the big one hit. So isolation for a few weeks is just a matter of losing fresh foods.

We even have wine and beer, but I suspect not enough for a month. ;)

canklecat 03-30-20 04:27 AM

Yup. I've been a prepper since the 1970s. I went through a late-Cold War survivalist phase but soon regained my sanity and resumed what my family considered normal preparedness.

So I've always kept plenty of toilet paper, food, soap, emergency water, even surgical masks and latex gloves. I didn't need to panic-buy when the rabble raided the local stores.

I've added a few extra boxes of favorite energy/protein bars. I always kept those around for bike rides, but now buy a few more for emergencies. I scrounge the bargain bins at Kroger and other stores often for short-dated stuff.

I don't really understand people who aren't prepared to go at least a week without needing to shop. About 20 years ago I briefly lived in Florida and was stunned to see how ill-prepared so many people were for routine hurricanes and tropical storms. Just before a storm they'd stock up on flashlights, batteries, snack foods, toilet paper. And within a week after the storm passed they'd want to return it all for a refund. Lather, rinse, repeat, every hurricane/storm. But they always had enough money for partying, booze and nightclubbing. Seemed to be a quirk of the entire Gulf Coast. A family friend explained it by saying "There are only two seasons on the Gulf Coast: Mardi Gras, and gittin' ready for Mardi Gras." They only thought about living for the moment.

To some extent, that mentality has infected the government and some institutions. A good friend is an EMT and has been limited to one surgical mask A WEEK. That's for a front-line emergency medical professional whose job is to deal with injuries and sudden onsets of serious illnesses. One mask a week. Another friend who makes prostheses for children had to sew up her own face masks at home.

However that's not as simple as lack of preparedness. It's also due to the entire economic shift toward minimal inventory and just-in-time delivery. And that system has worked well in normal times. But now we're in an crisis better suited to military-style logistics.

My grandparents were young adults during the Great Depression and it influenced them, and some of us, even more than their earlier rural Texas life had. My grandparents always kept a well stocked household and were early adopters of the healthy, self-sufficient living lifestyle by the 1960s -- organic gardening, growing and canning, freezing and preserving enough homegrown food for a complete diet, needing only meat and dairy for variety. The bought almost every book published by Rodale Press, subscribed to many related magazines, etc., and I added the post-flower-child/hippie influence of Whole Earth Catalogs, which I gave them as gifts.

By the mid to late 1970s some friends and I in the military leaned more toward the survivalist lifestyle -- in retrospect a fairly typical thing for young men in the military in almost any era. Our influence was primarily the still-hot Cold War, but with a touch of suspicion of federal government overreach, a bit of paranoia influenced by various actual conspiracies that were gradually being revealed. My closest and sanest friend of that bunch was somewhat influenced by the Seventh-day Adventist Church, which has long encouraged a culture of preparedness and independence from government authorities. Other of my acquaintances were into more extreme stuff, what would later be called the patriot militia movement.

My younger veteran friends are still going through that phase, although their influences range from Ruby Ridge (Randy Weaver) and Waco (Branch Davidians, an extreme offshoot of the Seventh-day Adventists) to the endless wars of US imperialism against the Middle East. Basically, we were/are overeager, under-informed young men trained for a mission that didn't exist. So we found our own missions.

The aftermath of Ruby Ridge, Waco, the first attack on the World Trade Center in the 1990s, the 9/11 attacks, our endless Gulf wars and government overreaction including violations of privacy, etc., finally forced me to reconsider my views. In many ways these misguided, disaffected, alienated men who viewed themselves as "patriots" and the last real Americans, were actually creating as many problems as they claimed to be solving or preventing.

They were too anxious to skip right over the 1st Amendment directly to the 2nd as the first solution to every problem. My training was health care, not harming people. And I believe in exploring every option under the 1st Amendment until every possibility has been exhausted. We've never exhausted the 1st Amendment's power, so there's never been any real need to resort to the 2nd as a fix for a broken government.

And, frankly, about 20 years ago I realized some of my family and in-laws thought my views and preparedness methods were kooky. I'd been nurturing my views in a vacuum for so long I had no idea what other people thought of my views and preoccupations.

Long story short, for the past 20 years, my preparedness has pared way back to ensuring we always have enough household supplies, food and basic first aid needs to last 1-3 months. That's about all.

One of my primary occupations for more than 20 years was as secondary or primary caregiver for ailing elderly relatives -- both grandparents, then my mom. I took stock of what we actually needed during emergencies during that time. In our former rural home, we needed enough stuff to get through an occasional power outage for a day or two -- so, basically, flashlights, radios, batteries, lamps and oil. Stuff to quickly patch a leaky roof until a contractor could fix the rest, or I could climb up and do it properly. Never needed a gun, other than an airgun to thin out the herd of squirrels trying to steal shingles or invade the attic.

About 10 years ago I bought big boxes of surgical masks and latex gloves. I seldom needed them as a caregiver. Mostly I used one or two masks each winter for bicycle rides in bitterly cold, dry air. Last week I did a quick inventory and realized I still had a dozen masks. I set aside six for myself, and bagged up six along with pairs of latex gloves, each in individual baggies, for the maintenance crew at our apartment complex. Our apartment complex is mostly elderly and disabled folks. The maintenance crew are in and out of apartments every day, and had only construction type dust masks and gloves. Hopefully they'll get some use from my small donation and minimize the risk of spreading the coronavirus or other cooties through our small community.

I still keep enough food for a few months. Mostly boring stuff I don't normally eat, but it'll be handy in an emergency: dried beans, rice, pasta, etc. I've cut way back on carbs and sugar in an effort toward a healthier diet to eliminate some pesky symptoms from an auto-immune disorder. I seem to do better with more animal products and fewer carbs and even fewer vegetables and fruits, although I haven't given up bananas. I still use onions, bananas, potatoes and mushrooms for fixing pot roast. I rarely eat pasta anymore, or rice, beans, corn products, etc. But I have 'em if it comes to that.

When my mom was alive she used a roll of toilet paper every day. Partly due to physical side effects from her Alzheimer's and other ailments (she had a lot more problems with phlegm as she got older), partly a harmless obsession from her dementia. It wasn't worth trying to get her to use napkins for eating, paper towels for cleanup, etc. She wanted to use toilet paper for everything, fine with me. So I always kept plenty on hand. I probably still have 20 rolls, and I go through maybe one roll a week. And part of my use of TP is for cleaning up cat hair and cat barf, just about every day. I adopted my mom's three cats and they make a worse mess than toddlers.

chewybrian 03-30-20 05:35 AM


Originally Posted by canklecat (Post 21390891)
I don't really understand people who aren't prepared to go at least a week without needing to shop. About 20 years ago I briefly lived in Florida and was stunned to see how ill-prepared so many people were for routine hurricanes and tropical storms. Just before a storm they'd stock up on flashlights, batteries, snack foods, toilet paper. And within a week after the storm passed they'd want to return it all for a refund. Lather, rinse, repeat, every hurricane/storm. But they always had enough money for partying, booze and nightclubbing. Seemed to be a quirk of the entire Gulf Coast..

Living on the east coast, near Cocoa Beach, I can confirm that this is true for all of Florida.

genec 03-30-20 06:31 AM


Originally Posted by chewybrian (Post 21390941)
Living on the east coast, near Cocoa Beach, I can confirm that this is true for all of Florida.

I was in Palm Bay this last year, and went through Dorian. I was living in an RV, doing contract design work in the area. In the RV, I was always prepared to go "dry camping" for a week or more... have food, water, gloves, alcohol (to drink and wash).

I kept asking folks at work what I should plan for, and kept getting "don't worry" responses as the NHC kept upgrading the strength of the storm.

About 3-4 days before it was due to hit, I noticed the panic buying and change of mood... Publix had pallets of water, HD had generators on sale.

I hooked up my RV and went to western Georgia... the roads were clear, as Floridians had not yet panicked enough to start their own exodus. I listened to the radio, and 2 days later, there was no gas, highways were crowded... the governor was declaring emergencies. JEEZE.

Florida is full of crazy folks. (Floridaman) Live for the moment and play or panic. What really got me is all the folks wanting to return generators and the like... as if another storm will never come.

Must be the heat and humidity... drives folks nuts!

308jerry 03-30-20 09:34 AM


Originally Posted by chewybrian (Post 21390941)
Living on the east coast, near Cocoa Beach, I can confirm that this is true for all of Florida.

I think this is vastly true of America in general. Might be pockets of people ready but for the most part not so much.....

bikecrate 03-30-20 10:14 AM

I have been keeping a pretty good supply of TP around for hurricane purposes. My wife used to tease me about it, but who's laughing now?! :) There is usually a decent supply of can goods too. I went on vacation during the week this all went to poop and not only was I not following the news all that closely, but since we were out of town I missed my usual grocery day. I was low on meat and veggies. However, the store mostly had what I needed when we got back. They were limiting quantities on certain items, which sucked since I was basically buying for my immediate needs and not hording. I think I could go for almost a month before I would start to worry.

chewybrian 03-30-20 11:03 AM


Originally Posted by 308jerry (Post 21391305)
I think this is vastly true of America in general. Might be pockets of people ready but for the most part not so much.....

I know it might be in poor taste to make this about the economy, but...


78% Of Workers Live Paycheck To Paycheck


https://www.forbes.com/sites/zackfri.../#1b24c0564f10


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:08 PM.


Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.