Bike Forums

Bike Forums (https://www.bikeforums.net/forum.php)
-   Mountain Biking (https://www.bikeforums.net/forumdisplay.php?f=26)
-   -   MTB without suspension ? (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=1184383)

willbuyone 09-24-19 06:28 PM

MTB without suspension ?
 
Are there any new decent quality MTB without any suspension on them ? I want one for casual riding on dirt trails and do not want the added weight of suspension forks. I have been looking online and in a few Local bike shops and do not remember seeing any.

Brian25 09-24-19 07:31 PM

Wow, I thought I was the last one on the planet who thinks this way. I was a bike store owner for over 12 years. I have been mountain biking since the mid 80's. before 1990 there were no shocks, and guess what; everyone at that time were perfectly happy with rigid forks. Then like a bug / perception- bang all of a sudden no one seemed like they could fathom mountain biking with a rigid fork. I build bike frames, so I ride what I like. I have had shock fork mountain bikes. Guess what; the trails are just as bumpy as with the shock forks. I say If the trail is too bumpy, maybe you should stick to road biking. Ha Ha. Anyways the truth is that rigid mountain bikes don't sell, so you are going to have a difficult time finding one. I recommend that you check out craigs list, there are always old mountain bikes on there.

Canker 09-24-19 10:35 PM

https://www.jensonusa.com/Marin-Pine-Mountain-Bike-2019

bikesdirect used to have some decent ones as well but their website is actin up for me atm so I can't look. The problem with rigid bikes is they are usually either really cheap low end single speed bikes or rather expensive geared/single speed bikes from boutique brands. There aren't a lot in the middle

Darth Lefty 09-25-19 12:13 AM

Karate Monkey

Kona Unit

Dr.Lou 09-25-19 12:13 AM

I also wanted a MTB sans suspension. I went with the Surly Krampus and glad I did. https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...e05f5a71a.jpeg

Leebo 09-25-19 06:41 AM

As said, Kona, Surly, Salsa and niner will have some. Think about a 29er with plus tires. I too have a Krampus, great for bikepacking.

prj71 09-25-19 07:33 AM

Specialized Crave if you can find one in the used market since Specialized no longer makes that bike.

Clem von Jones 09-25-19 10:10 AM

Suspensions are a moronic marketing gimmick. There will never be a bike suspension as sophisticated as your arms and legs. Just raise yourself off the saddle over big bumps and problem solved. Sure race bikes are faster with suspension forks over the rough stuff, but who cares? You're not racing. You're going for a bicycle ride and don't need a broken neck caused from excessive speed.

LesterOfPuppets 09-25-19 10:26 AM


Originally Posted by willbuyone (Post 21136918)
Are there any new decent quality MTB without any suspension on them ? I want one for casual riding on dirt trails and do not want the added weight of suspension forks. I have been looking online and in a few Local bike shops and do not remember seeing any.

You could always add a rigid fork to a nice xc hardtail you like.

In the price-is-no-object realm, you could build up an Open One with a rigid fork. This one's 15.2 lbs

https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...f8539c9fe4.jpg

Darth Lefty 09-25-19 10:39 AM


Originally Posted by Clem von Jones (Post 21137739)
Suspensions are a moronic marketing gimmick.

Who needs tires, while you're at it? Go back to 1990 and take your bike with you :P :D

Leebo 09-25-19 12:44 PM


Originally Posted by Clem von Jones (Post 21137739)
Suspensions are a moronic marketing gimmick. There will never be a bike suspension as sophisticated as your arms and legs. Just raise yourself off the saddle over big bumps and problem solved. Sure race bikes are faster with suspension forks over the rough stuff, but who cares? You're not racing. You're going for a bicycle ride and don't need a broken neck caused from excessive speed.

Come ride a mile in my shoes. 6" of travel kicks ass, and I use all of it. Rocks and big rocks here in MA. I like to finish my ride of say 2-4 hrs being able to walk. And not be beat up. Dude, do you even shread bro?

rumrunn6 09-25-19 01:34 PM

hmmm, dunno, looking at my cheap spring coil forks & seeing how much travel is used, plus knowing that I'm more comfortable without so much jarring & shock to my wrists, etc. don't think I'd go backwards technologically. rigid forks have a place in my cycling but not off road. been there, done that, don't like it

Kapusta 09-25-19 04:04 PM


Originally Posted by Clem von Jones (Post 21137739)
Suspensions are a moronic marketing gimmick. There will never be a bike suspension as sophisticated as your arms and legs. Just raise yourself off the saddle over big bumps and problem solved. Sure race bikes are faster with suspension forks over the rough stuff, but who cares? You're not racing. You're going for a bicycle ride and don't need a broken neck caused from excessive speed.

:50:

:roflmao2:

prj71 09-26-19 07:47 AM


Originally Posted by Clem von Jones (Post 21137739)
Suspensions are a moronic marketing gimmick. There will never be a bike suspension as sophisticated as your arms and legs. Just raise yourself off the saddle over big bumps and problem solved.

This just might be the most moronic thing I have read on this forum.


For the OP...if all you are looking for a is a bike to ride dirt trails look at the Giant ToughRoad.

https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/bikes-toughroad-slr

eshew 09-26-19 12:05 PM

https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...b676cbd651.jpg
https://cimg3.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...25730867e8.jpg
Don't forget old early 80's & 90's mountain bikes! Specialized stumpjumper should be easy to find & cheap. Or if you're lucky you can find something older

xroadcharlie 09-26-19 01:47 PM


Originally Posted by prj71 (Post 21139008)
This just might be the most moronic thing I have read on this forum.


For the OP...if all you are looking for a is a bike to ride dirt trails look at the Giant ToughRoad.

https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/bikes-toughroad-slr

+1
That looks like a fine bike for the OP's purposes. Personally I wouldn't be afraid of the suspension forks on a Giant mountain bike like this Talon 2 for recreational riders who aren't jumping off rocks.

https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/talon-2-2020

But those fat tires on the Toughroad ought to smooth things pretty good too..

I do a lot of riding on rough MUP's and roads, And I can tell you this, I will be getting a bike WITH the suspension forks next time. It's actually faster and more comfortable then rigid forks despite the extra 2 lb (approx. 1% total weight) or so because we don't have to slow down over what would surely be a punishing ride with rigid forks.

eshew 09-26-19 04:17 PM

I'd look for something used. $750 for that Talon.... fair amount of money for a very low end build. That bike is a few years from being a $300 bike. Might as well start looking for something that's already had a fair amount of depreciation. Use the extra $$ for upgrades as needed.

Here is a nice US made titanium frame, serial and BB stamp point to Sandvic made in Kennewick WA could obviously use some upgrades but for the price, tough to beat ti.

https://slo.craigslist.org/bik/d/san...971376534.html

Daspydyr 09-26-19 04:38 PM

I loved my rigid mountain bikes. They bounced me all over the place and tossed me over the bars often. But I learned to squeeze the saddle with my legs and balance and anticipate craters. I think I am a better rider for riding in the pre-lazy boy recliner bike days.

Darth Lefty 09-27-19 12:47 PM

There's a lively niche, to be sure.

I sort of like the idea of a minimalist but ultralight bike. Some of the "Chiner" bikes are astonishing

Clem von Jones 09-27-19 12:47 PM

Bike geometry designed around suspension forks is one of the reasons so many prefer gravel bikes now. A bike designed for a suspension fork has a high front end which hinders you on steep climbs. It hinders you everywhere because a low center of gravity is desirable. I often see mtb riders who can't get adequate weight on the front wheel and are weaving from side to side while climbing their bike fighting them every inch of the way. Nor can you replace a suspension fork with a lower rigid fork without also lowering the bottom bracket clearance and forcing your seatpost/saddle too far forward. If the frame is designed for a suspension fork it will never make a good rigid bike, so if you buy a new carbon frame with the intention of making a rigid bike you'll discover too late the front is too high. Now the high front would be okay if the effective top tube was also short enough to get more weight forward using a long stem, but the crappy "new and improved" geometry they're using already has the top tube stretched to the maximum limit, so forget that. Eventually you conclude these bikes are designed by and for ski resorts and require a ski lift to go uphill. The forward geometry, larger wheel sizes, and suspension mitigates risks for bombing downhill. These bikes are designed to lower the risk of you flying over the bars when the front wheel hits a ditch or boulder. That's the main reason they exist. They're supposed to be passive down-hill rides and you won't burn many calories on them. Now if that's your thing, then fine. If you live at a ski resort and have a yearly pass, and don't want to exert any effort riding a bicycle it's perfect. If you live in a place where there are no hills like Florida they might be okay.

If you're determined to use a suspension it's better to have a fully suspended bike because then the high front is offset by a high rear end, but that also raises your center of gravity. For climbing it's also better to have 26" wheels because the smaller wheels generate more torque using the same output. The downside to this kind of bike is that it will encourage you to go too fast downhill and makes you feel disconnected from the trail. There's also some lateral slop in the suspension. The general feeling is of vague disassociation. These bikes rip up the trail because they go too fast so when the brakes are applied large stones tear out of the ground.

Also, get off my lawn! :50:

L8APEXN 09-27-19 06:14 PM


Originally Posted by Clem von Jones (Post 21140952)
Bike geometry designed around suspension forks is one of the reasons so many prefer gravel bikes now. A bike designed for a suspension fork has a high front end which hinders you on steep climbs. It hinders you everywhere because a low center of gravity is desirable. I often see mtb riders who can't get adequate weight on the front wheel and are weaving from side to side while climbing their bike fighting them every inch of the way. Nor can you replace a suspension fork with a lower rigid fork without also lowering the bottom bracket clearance and forcing your seatpost/saddle too far forward. If the frame is designed for a suspension fork it will never make a good rigid bike, so if you buy a new carbon frame with the intention of making a rigid bike you'll discover too late the front is too high. Now the high front would be okay if the effective top tube was also short enough to get more weight forward using a long stem, but the crappy "new and improved" geometry they're using already has the top tube stretched to the maximum limit, so forget that. Eventually you conclude these bikes are designed by and for ski resorts and require a ski lift to go uphill. The forward geometry, larger wheel sizes, and suspension mitigates risks for bombing downhill. These bikes are designed to lower the risk of you flying over the bars when the front wheel hits a ditch or boulder. That's the main reason they exist. They're supposed to be passive down-hill rides and you won't burn many calories on them. Now if that's your thing, then fine. If you live at a ski resort and have a yearly pass, and don't want to exert any effort riding a bicycle it's perfect. If you live in a place where there are no hills like Florida they might be okay.

If you're determined to use a suspension it's better to have a fully suspended bike because then the high front is offset by a high rear end, but that also raises your center of gravity. For climbing it's also better to have 26" wheels because the smaller wheels generate more torque using the same output. The downside to this kind of bike is that it will encourage you to go too fast downhill and makes you feel disconnected from the trail. There's also some lateral slop in the suspension. The general feeling is of vague disassociation. These bikes rip up the trail because they go too fast so when the brakes are applied large stones tear out of the ground.

Also, get off my lawn! :50:


This has to be a parody account.

OldsCOOL 09-27-19 08:02 PM


Originally Posted by Brian25 (Post 21137007)
Wow, I thought I was the last one on the planet who thinks this way. I was a bike store owner for over 12 years. I have been mountain biking since the mid 80's. before 1990 there were no shocks, and guess what; everyone at that time were perfectly happy with rigid forks. Then like a bug / perception- bang all of a sudden no one seemed like they could fathom mountain biking with a rigid fork. I build bike frames, so I ride what I like. I have had shock fork mountain bikes. Guess what; the trails are just as bumpy as with the shock forks. I say If the trail is too bumpy, maybe you should stick to road biking. Ha Ha. Anyways the truth is that rigid mountain bikes don't sell, so you are going to have a difficult time finding one. I recommend that you check out craigs list, there are always old mountain bikes on there.

+10 My thoughts exactly. I ride a rigid 97 Trek 7000 on the singletracks and trails. I certainly cant keep up with the racers on the modern bikes I can still have a blast.

North Coast Joe 09-28-19 03:37 AM

This is only my third year "in the woods" coming there from a roadie's experience . Just some more info which may influence my choices, I'm 67 and not racing, really not group riding either. Picking my way through intermediate level trails with little drama, much like "trials" motorcycling. Speed has no influence on me, except for the occasional deliberate, adrenaline boosting run for fun. I'll pull over and let the quick ones by...just gives me a chance for a drink and a blow.

The first two years out there made me question my rigid choices, but this year the sun poked through my noobish cloud cover and suddenly all's right with the world again! I'm not feeling beat to hell after a ride, seem to have more than adequate control of the bike's and my balance, and sure haven't spent much time rebuilding suspension components. Experience is a GREAT teacher!

I have one bike that's undersized deliberately, then modified to fit comfortably. It's extremely handy...easy to lift the front, back or both on demand. That bike is a mid '80's Fuji with the original rigid fork. My other bike is a 2011 Trek that has it's coil fork replaced with a rigid Soma. I thought the whole idea of "suspension corrected" rigid forks were to keep the original geometry close to what the designer intended? No matter, for me anyway, as it handles very well and does what I need.

I can sure understand full suspension if you're "at speed" for most of your ride, that choice is obvious. If you're in my situation, rigid works, and works well. I'm in the woods and travelling much faster than if on foot. Matter of fact, I'd fall more hiking the trails I ride than I do riding them!

CodyDog 10-06-19 02:08 PM

I ride my Trek Checkpoint (gravel bike) on intermediate single track. Obviously no suspension and it is doable. I have a lot of years of medium to advanced single track riding I my past which helps me ride the Checkpoint on trails. With that being said, I am in the process of getting a mountain bike with suspension for the trails I ride. I'm tired of taking the abuse on my neck and back.

I would recommend, as other here have suggested, going with a front suspension. There will probably be a time when you are going to want to push it. The extra weight is minimal and well worth the trade off. There is one exception, I do have a fat bike that I changed out the front suspension fork for a rigid but I can lower the pressure on my 4" tires (10-15 PSI) to absorb a great deal of shock.

SnowJob 10-06-19 04:09 PM

I'm a fan of rigid mtbs, having two (although my ice cream truck with it's 5" tires has plenty of shock dampening).

I gotta say though, I've ridden full suspension bikes at demos and goddamn those things are freaking amazing. If I had a few extra thousand bucks and wasn't such a crappy rider, I'd definitely be investing in a sweet full sus whip


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:11 PM.


Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.