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-   -   Yes! Study shows that for those over 50, the more you ride, the longer you'll live (https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=1183969)

Carbonfiberboy 09-19-19 11:15 AM

Yes! Study shows that for those over 50, the more you ride, the longer you'll live
 
Of course we all knew that already, but still . . .
https://trainright.com/middle-aged-a...years-to-life/

pdlamb 09-19-19 01:20 PM

Yay! I like this study!

(Is this an instance of confirmation bias?)

wphamilton 09-19-19 02:19 PM

Same for leisure running, and in fact cardiovascular fitness has the predominate correlation for reducing all-cause mortality and risk of cardio disease mortality. I would caution though that more is not necessarily better, or at least not a lot better. The benefits seem to taper off after around 2-2.5 hours per week of moderate or harder aerobic exercise.

berner 09-19-19 02:42 PM

Is playing a saxophone considered aerobic?

rumrunn6 09-19-19 02:43 PM

sounds good

Retro Grouch 09-19-19 02:47 PM

So if you stay healthy you'll live longer. Who knew?

Hondo Gravel 09-19-19 03:16 PM

Yup some people I know can’t even ride a bike a few hundred yards without hyperventilating. Then proceed to tell me about how to eat and workout. I believe keeping the cardiovascular system in good shape will add some years to life.

OldTryGuy 09-19-19 03:27 PM

Good to know that the more I ride the longer I'll have to live with my cancer. :bang:

bobwysiwyg 09-19-19 04:01 PM


Originally Posted by wphamilton (Post 21129559)
Same for leisure running, and in fact cardiovascular fitness has the predominate correlation for reducing all-cause mortality and risk of cardio disease mortality. I would caution though that more is not necessarily better, or at least not a lot better. The benefits seem to taper off after around 2-2.5 hours per week of moderate or harder aerobic exercise.

I would like to know more about this, can you point me to a source?

wphamilton 09-19-19 04:11 PM


Originally Posted by bobwysiwyg (Post 21129676)
I would like to know more about this, can you point me to a source?

I'm going by recollection, but google "running CVD" and it should pop up several. What that won't show up are the commonalities with cycling, which is what lead me to abstract out the "cardio-vascular fitness" that keeps popping up as the major correlating factor. That's not the same as "more healthy" by the way, but it does correlate with better health.

TimothyH 09-19-19 04:20 PM

You might fall into the center of the bell curve or you might break your neck tomorrow.

Live as if the latter will happen, not the former.

Be nice to people beneath you, especially the least and the lowest. Go to confession. Remember that a bicycle wonít sit at your bedside when you are dying. Work hard. Sleep well. Enjoy life. Get out and see the world because it is damn beautiful out there.

-Tim-

bobwysiwyg 09-19-19 04:49 PM


Originally Posted by TimothyH (Post 21129711)
You might fall into the center of the bell curve or you might break your neck tomorrow.

Live as if the latter will happen, not the former.

Be nice to people beneath you, especially the least and the lowest. Go to confession. Remember that a bicycle wonít sit at your bedside when you are dying. Work hard. Sleep well. Enjoy life. Get out and see the world because it is damn beautiful out there.

-Tim-

I don't consider anyone "beneath" me.

bobwysiwyg 09-19-19 04:50 PM


Originally Posted by wphamilton (Post 21129695)
I'm going by recollection, but google "running CVD" and it should pop up several. What that won't show up are the commonalities with cycling, which is what lead me to abstract out the "cardio-vascular fitness" that keeps popping up as the major correlating factor. That's not the same as "more healthy" by the way, but it does correlate with better health.

Thank you, will do. Just a matter of curiosity on my part.

Lab4Us 09-19-19 05:36 PM


Originally Posted by TimothyH (Post 21129711)
You might fall into the center of the bell curve or you might break your neck tomorrow.

Live as if the latter will happen, not the former.

Be nice to people beneath you, especially the least and the lowest. Go to confession. Remember that a bicycle wonít sit at your bedside when you are dying. Work hard. Sleep well. Enjoy life. Get out and see the world because it is damn beautiful out there.

-Tim-

Isnít that what the bikes are for?

horatio 09-19-19 05:55 PM


Originally Posted by Lab4Us (Post 21129813)
Isnít that what the bikes are for?

Especially gravel bikes...

August West 09-19-19 06:50 PM

I ran across this article last year. It makes quite a case for exercising as you age. The more the better according the study.


Conclusions
Increased CRF was associated with reduced long-term mortality with no observed upper limit of benefit. The adjusted mortality risk of reduced CRF was greater than or equal to traditional clinical risk factors, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and smoking. Extreme aerobic fitness (CRF ≥2 SDs above the mean for age and sex) was associated with the greatest survival and was notably beneficial in older patients and those with hypertension. Cardiorespiratory fitness is a modifiable indicator of long-term mortality, and health care professionals should encourage patients to achieve and maintain high levels of fitness.
CNN Article - Not exercising worse for your health than smoking, diabetes and heart disease, study reveals

The actual JAMA study

79pmooney 09-19-19 07:02 PM

I don't know if this can be proven rigorously, but it is pretty self evident that you will live as long as you keep riding. So if I copy my mom and ride until I am 86, I will live at least another 20 years. (My mom went another 5.) In that context, riding seems like a no-brainer.

Ben

FiftySix 09-19-19 07:10 PM

I just want to get back to riding regularly again. So I can live longer. So I can ride more. So I can live longer . . .

My knee is feeling good, but lots of work at the job and at the house over the last few weeks. Plus all this dang rain this week.

I'm hoping for some riding Saturday morning before the chores start up again. :speedy:

Carbonfiberboy 09-19-19 08:25 PM

Yeah. So my wife and I returned from our annual 10-day unsupported backpack a week ago. I went in with 55 lbs., she with 45. We had a great time even though it rained a lot. My CTL went up 14 pts. in those 10 days. Hers went up 26. That's what we do about the inhaling beauty thing. One of my favorite things is sitting and chanting while I purify water from whatever source. Sounds goofy but it's nice.

I'm trying to get back into riding shape, so today I did an hour of VT1 on my rollers then went to the gym and lifted for an hour, 1' between sets. That was all good. Interesting thing - trying to do VT1 was weird. We'd spent most of that 10 days between 5000' and 7500' and we live at sea level. I couldn't achieve VT1 without going up into zone 3 with power, so I didn't, staying at the top of Z2. My hematocrit must have already gone up or what? I didn't think RBCs matured that quickly. Anyway I feel really good. Legs hurt a bit from the unaccustomed exercise is all, and all to the good IME. 3 mile run tomorrow. My wife's still a little tired, so she canned a year's worth of ketchup today. We try to eat a natural foods diet.

It really does work.

As noted in the caveats above, I don't do a lot of really hard intervals anymore. Lots of steady state Z4, but not much above. We've had some riders age out earlier than they should have, my thinking being that maybe they went a little too hard, too often, for too many years. It's not necessary to get that last 5% unless one is competing. IMHO. 74 y.o., wife 70.

bargo68 09-19-19 11:12 PM


Originally Posted by berner (Post 21129579)
Is playing a saxophone considered aerobic?

If you play like Coltrane, Charlie Parker, Archie Shepp, Marshall Allen, Sonny Rollins, Wayne Shorter, Art Pepper, Eddie Davis, Albert Ayler, Cannonball, Johnny Griffin or Dexter Gordon...YES!

If you play like Lester Young, Coleman Hawkins, Stan Getz, Joe Henderson, Al Cohn or most of the West Coast cats... NO!

bruce19 09-20-19 05:52 AM


Originally Posted by Retro Grouch (Post 21129590)
So if you stay healthy you'll live longer. Who knew?

Next thing you know they will be talking about eating healthy food.

freeranger 09-20-19 06:38 AM

Heard that before, and a firm believer that most exercise done regularly will help you live longer. My choice would be cycling, so I like the study's conclusion. I've also heard that married people live longer--but that some say it just feels like it!!

rumrunn6 09-20-19 06:46 AM

good genes & diet don't hurt. my Dad is 92 & I never saw him on a bike. he had a desk job his whole life but he brought us up hiking, mountaineering & light rock climbing on the weekends. in cold weather we built a small fire for lunchtime. he loves going in the ocean but wasn't really a swimmer. Mom is 89 & still shops & cooks for them both. they still live in the house I grew up in; laundry in the basement & bedrooms on the 2nd floor. my Dad recently told me he has no money to leave me, only longevity. hope he's right! :50:

berner 09-20-19 07:06 AM


Originally Posted by bargo68 (Post 21130196)
If you play like Coltrane, Charlie Parker, Archie Shepp, Marshall Allen, Sonny Rollins, Wayne Shorter, Art Pepper, Eddie Davis, Albert Ayler, Cannonball, Johnny Griffin or Dexter Gordon...YES!

If you play like Lester Young, Coleman Hawkins, Stan Getz, Joe Henderson, Al Cohn or most of the West Coast cats... NO!

I'm more from the Bill Clinton school.

bargo68 09-20-19 08:54 AM


Originally Posted by berner (Post 21130411)
I'm more from the Bill Clinton school.

In that case, I would advise you watch out for the interns.

TiHabanero 09-20-19 06:13 PM

Not really interested in longevity, more interested in quality to the end. Middle age should be a straight line on the chart, with minimal ups and downs, and then at the "old age" mark the line goes straight down to the end.

Interpreted as "live a healthy problem free life and then simply die." That is my goal. A life lived to the very end.

TakingMyTime 09-20-19 07:26 PM

Yes! Study shows that for those over 50, the more you ride, the longer you'll live

His grasp of the painfully obvious is incredible

Carbonfiberboy 09-20-19 11:08 PM


Originally Posted by TakingMyTime (Post 21131434)
Yes! Study shows that for those over 50, the more you ride, the longer you'll live

His grasp of the painfully obvious is incredible

It's really more interesting that that. It shows that those who had the highest VO2max values at 48 lived longer. No followup except for death dates. I was running with the ball after the buzzer there, just for fun. You must not have clicked. Replying to studies you haven't read isn't always the best idea. They authors' opinion seems to be that by 48 the genetic component falls off and VO2max numbers better reflect those who've continued working hard in their sport and less those who were just born with it. Or not? Is longevity more inherited or worked for? The study does not pretend to answer that question. Nature/nurture. Personal experience of many readers seems to indicate a belief that it becomes more nurture. Perhaps that is true. Certainly TdF GC winners and high placers are long lived, We don't really know. My doctor seems to think that by my age it's more nurture, as do I, being one who wasn't born with a high VO2max and at 48 had not been aerobically active for a couple decades.

In any case, it's good to be among the few who grasp the painfully obvious. Little people come out of my ears and wave flags. I'm just glad I'm no younger.

OldsCOOL 09-21-19 06:57 AM


Originally Posted by horatio (Post 21129843)
Especially gravel bikes...

And mountain biking. Cycling in general, even at a casual pace tends to work most of the muscle structure. Add to that an aggressive single track or rutty gravel grind or steep hills and the next day you get the feeling of a very good workout.

TakingMyTime 09-21-19 07:31 AM


Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy (Post 21131653)
It's really more interesting that that. It shows that those who had the highest VO2max values at 48 lived longer. No followup except for death dates. I was running with the ball after the buzzer there, just for fun. You must not have clicked. Replying to studies you haven't read isn't always the best idea. They authors' opinion seems to be that by 48 the genetic component falls off and VO2max numbers better reflect those who've continued working hard in their sport and less those who were just born with it. Or not? Is longevity more inherited or worked for? The study does not pretend to answer that question. Nature/nurture. Personal experience of many readers seems to indicate a belief that it becomes more nurture. Perhaps that is true. Certainly TdF GC winners and high placers are long lived, We don't really know. My doctor seems to think that by my age it's more nurture, as do I, being one who wasn't born with a high VO2max and at 48 had not been aerobically active for a couple decades.

In any case, it's good to be among the few who grasp the painfully obvious. Little people come out of my ears and wave flags. I'm just glad I'm no younger.

You got me on that one. I did not read the article and was responding only to the headline.


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