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JohnJ80 04-02-20 05:21 PM


Originally Posted by bobin (Post 21396023)
I think I just need to enjoy cycling for a chance to get outside and exercise and not push it anymore. I'm nearing 50 and have only been cycling for 6 years but for the life of me can't get my FTP above 200. Thought I was digging a hole last year so this winter really took it easy and tried to rest up over the winter. Last few rides I've been tried to start two or three 15mi rides averaging 120bpm per week. Any time though I get on Zwift or outside and try to really hit it hard for longer than an hour - not only am I wiped out - but it feels like I'm hungover a little the next day. Back to why I took it easy over the winter. My grumpiness just skyrockets the next day. Yesterday I went out for 25 miles and averaged 145bpm often times hitting 175 and it felt good with an average of almost 18mph/200w. Good lord was I moody and wiped out mentally today. Not so much physical fatigue but like my window of tolerance is zero - like I'm strung out or something. Been getting some pretty good sleep lately too. And now that we're quarantined inside all the time I need to be in a good mood for the wife and kids. Not sure what's going on here - going to miss cranking up the engine - but maybe the engine is trying to tell me something.

I'm a lot older than you and I don't need to dial it back. If it's that bad, make an appt with your doc and make sure nothing else is wrong. If nothing wrong there, then get a personal trainer to help you out.

J.

EGBigelo 04-02-20 09:45 PM


Originally Posted by JohnJ80 (Post 21397725)
I'm a lot older than you and I don't need to dial it back. If it's that bad, make an appt with your doc and make sure nothing else is wrong. If nothing wrong there, then get a personal trainer to help you out.

J.

I agree with this. See a doctor and get checked out. That wiped out feeling, especially with the hungover feeling the next day, could be from another condition you have lurking. I turned 50 a couple years ago, and this is the first year I've felt like it's taking me forever to get my fitness back this spring (no riding all winter for me up here in PA). It's been frustrating to say the least.

sweeks 04-04-20 04:06 PM

I second ("third"?) what JohnJ80 and EGBigelo have said. You may have a "little" voice giving you the same advice: "...but maybe the engine is trying to tell me something."
You'll feel better with an official "green light".

JohnJ80 04-04-20 04:55 PM

Just to add some context for the OP and detail to what was above.

I'm 64. What I learned between your age and mine is that it's best check your ego at the door, get over being embarrassed about seeing the doc, and to make an effort to get in to seeing the doc right away when something isn't right. Make sure that they hear you when you tell them what your body is telling you and don't accept pat or easy answers if it isn't clear that's the problem. Turns out, that methodology saved my life when I caught a cancer early just about when I was your age when I insisted on some a test that wasn't typically prescribed until I was a few years older.

The other piece that I learned is that you need to assemble your own healthcare team and that needs to be (at least) your family practice doc, your sports medicine doc, physical therapist and a nutritionist and add others as required. But if you do that, you're going to be able to keep playing at a high level for a long time. Being active now is the key to being active when you're my age and older. I really see the results of being active compared to a lot of my peers....

So hope you get this figured out. A young whippersnapper like you ought to be tearing it up out there.

J.

Drew Eckhardt 04-06-20 08:25 AM


Originally Posted by bobin (Post 21396023)
I think I just need to enjoy cycling for a chance to get outside and exercise and not push it anymore. I'm nearing 50 and have only been cycling for 6 years but for the life of me can't get my FTP above 200. Thought I was digging a hole last year so this winter really took it easy and tried to rest up over the winter. Last few rides I've been tried to start two or three 15mi rides averaging 120bpm per week. Any time though I get on Zwift or outside and try to really hit it hard for longer than an hour - not only am I wiped out - but it feels like I'm hungover a little the next day. Back to why I took it easy over the winter. My grumpiness just skyrockets the next day. Yesterday I went out for 25 miles and averaged 145bpm often times hitting 175 and it felt good with an average of almost 18mph/200w. Good lord was I moody and wiped out mentally today. Not so much physical fatigue but like my window of tolerance is zero - like I'm strung out or something. Been getting some pretty good sleep lately too. And now that we're quarantined inside all the time I need to be in a good mood for the wife and kids. Not sure what's goin
g on here - going to miss cranking up the engine - but maybe the engine is trying to tell me something.

You're not going to increase your FTP "trying to really hit it hard for longer than an hour."

The greatest gains in power at lactate threshold, anaerobic threshold (AnT, VT2, LT4), FTP, CP60, or whatever you want to call it come from riding harder than it which isn't possible for "longer than an hour."

Stephen Seiler opines 7-10 minutes as hard as possible is ideal- it allows more volume than shorter intervals. Ride as hard as possible - ideally you'd fall off your bike unconscious at the end. You can probably hit 110% of FTP. Stop when you can't exceed your anaerobic threshold/FTP. You can't really do that more than twice a week.

The best performance over longer distances comes from riding below your aerobic threshold (AeT, VT1, LT1) where breathing becomes rhythmic, conversation doesn't flow, and you start to feel your legs.

Riding between the two thresholds does little for FTP/VO2max once you have a modicum of fitness, and more time there correlates to slower ironman triathlon times.

You also need low volume rest weeks because that's when adaptation occurs. While 1 in 4 is typical, some people especially older athletes need 1 in 3. Some can do 1 in 5.

Over reaching then overtraining is a function of weighted volume relative to your current fitness. 14 hours a week can be easy when that's what you've been averaging over the last year, or five can be too much after a six week layoff in which you lost most of your fitness.

People get this wrong with hard days that are too easy and easy days that are too hard.

FTP is limited by rider size. Noted coach Joel Friel has observed the cyclists he trains are capable of 4.4 W/kg +/- 10%, -0.5% per year past 35, -10% for females. At the low end and 60 kg as lean as you could get you wouldn't expect to do better than 220W at 50 with a few years of training which is much more than just riding around.

Lean by cycling standards is a lot lighter than people think is thin in a society where 70% of people are overweight or obese. At 150 pounds with a 28" waist I have an extra 14 pounds over my ideal cycling weight. Extra mass doesn't increase FTP - I'm good for the same power at 185 pounds or 135. The later is much faster up hill.

Paul Barnard 04-06-20 09:12 AM

Some hearts are just different from others. I took a stress test at the doctor's office some time ago. They kept me on the machine for 15 minutes adjusting the incline and speed bit by bit. The two technicians finally looked at each other and said "it's not going to happen." They were trying to push my heart rate to a certain point and it simply would not go. I have enjoyed cycling and the benefits of cycling without ever having measured my heart rate. I am not sure what I'd do with the numbers if I had them.

jrobe 04-06-20 09:48 AM

As an Internal Medicine Physician, the benefits of exercise are, of course, unquestionable. Having said that, there is now some evidence that one can overexercise especially as we all get older. I could show you quite a few studies that document this. Here is one study that suggests that there is a significant population of people that are "overexercisers" that have a higher risk of morbidity and mortality. This has been called the "J curve" of exercise that compares health status with different levels and intensity of exercise. This frequently shows that health improves with low and moderate exercise but then the mortality curve goes up with longer more intense chronic exercise especially after age 50. It has been hard though to clearly define what this more dangerous level of overexercise is.

I have been surprised how often I have seen this clinically with patients like marathon runners that presented with atrial fibrillation (an abnormal, often chronic heart rhythm problem that raises mortality) at relatively young ages. This study shows more atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) in marathon runners compared to people that don't exercise at all.

https://www.mayoclinicproceedings.or...14)00638-7/pdf

I am now 62 years old and have done power based interval workouts, races, century rides, etc. for at least 20 years. Now in my 60's, I have cut out the more intense intervals and don't pay much attention to my power meter anymore. I typically ride an hour or so daily and use the hills on my rides for my intervals. I usually ride at moderate aerobic levels to maintain good fitness but without overstressing my heart and body. I think there is some pretty good evidence to support this. Honestly, it has also made my cycling more enjoyable as I have gotten older.

MoAlpha 04-06-20 10:03 AM


Originally Posted by jrobe (Post 21403388)
As an Internal Medicine Physician, the benefits of exercise are, of course, unquestionable. Having said that, there is now some evidence that one can overexercise especially as we all get older. I could show you quite a few studies that document this. Here is one study that suggests that there is a significant population of people that are "overexercisers" that have a higher risk of morbidity and mortality. This has been called the "J curve" of exercise that compares health status with different levels and intensity of exercise. This frequently shows that health improves with low and moderate exercise but then the mortality curve goes up with longer more intense chronic exercise especially after age 50. It has been hard though to clearly define what this more dangerous level of overexercise is.

I have been surprised how often I have seen this clinically with patients like marathon runners that presented with atrial fibrillation (an abnormal, often chronic heart rhythm problem that raises mortality) at relatively young ages. This study shows more atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) in marathon runners compared to people that don't exercise at all.

https://www.mayoclinicproceedings.or...14)00638-7/pdf

I am now 62 years old and have done power based interval workouts, races, century rides, etc. for at least 20 years. Now in my 60's, I have cut out the more intense intervals and don't pay much attention to my power meter anymore. I typically ride an hour or so daily and use the hills on my rides for my intervals. I usually ride at moderate aerobic levels to maintain good fitness but without overstressing my heart and body. I think there is some pretty good evidence to support this. Honestly, it has also made my cycling more enjoyable as I have gotten older.

Good point, but not the OP's problem. I believe there is some evidence that (possibly irreversible) bradycardia in elderly athletes predisposes to AF.

bobin 06-11-20 10:19 AM


Originally Posted by jrobe (Post 21403388)
I am now 62 years old and have done power based interval workouts, races, century rides, etc. for at least 20 years. Now in my 60's, I have cut out the more intense intervals and don't pay much attention to my power meter anymore. I typically ride an hour or so daily and use the hills on my rides for my intervals. I usually ride at moderate aerobic levels to maintain good fitness but without overstressing my heart and body. I think there is some pretty good evidence to support this. Honestly, it has also made my cycling more enjoyable as I have gotten older.

Thanks everyone for the advice here! I'm totally gong to see a doc.

I went out for a good 25mi ride yesterday on two days rest and fueled pretty good. Other than a super tough 3 min stretch I took it pretty easy. My average HR for the whole ride was 135 with occasional peaks up into 160s. Had the following symptoms afterward:

I always feel pretty good initially when I get done - but as the night goes on I get increasingly grumpy and impatient. By the time I went to bed around 11pm, I felt pretty fatigued. I'm always able to fall asleep with a good audiobook - but I always wake up a couple hours later and I just toss and turn the rest of the night. It's like one or two hour sleep then 1 hour awake.

Recently though what's keeping me awake is a strange feeling in my chest. I've never had the feeling/sensation before of "feeling my heart pumping". It feels so weird it keeps me up deep breathing - especially when I lay on either side. It does not seem irregular or fluttering - it's just unnerving to feel it pumping. So yeah going in to the doc as soon as I can. Probably time to just keep it light and easy.

Carbonfiberboy 06-11-20 11:12 AM


Originally Posted by MoAlpha (Post 21403410)
Good point, but not the OP's problem. I believe there is some evidence that (possibly irreversible) bradycardia in elderly athletes predisposes to AF.

At what point, do you think? My normal, fit resting HR has been 46 for many years. If I'm out of shape it'll get all the way up to 50. I'm 74. I have an ultracyclist riding buddy, ~10 years younger, whose resting HR has been 40 for so long he had it inscribed on his Road ID. He developed Afib, like you say. Another friend developed Afib right at my current age, super fit and fast, ran a 4:17 mile in his 20s, never stopped training. I haven't had a symptom. I do have a partial left bundle branch block, but the cardiologist said I could have had it all my life or developed it when I raced Nordic in my teens, who knows. I don't have high BP or dilated cardiomyopathy. I do have a high calcium score, which as you noted is common among endurance athletes. The research I have read said that this condition, among this subgroup, is not associated with higher mortality. Apparently the plaque is of a different quality and doesn't disintegrate. Or so they say. Opinion? My will is up to date. :) My FTP is 160w and I've done long endurance rides, like 150 miles, 10,000', that sort of thing, every year since I was 52. This year everything's cancelled, which in a way is lucky since I have a horrible saddle sore and can't ride much. I'm running instead.

Carbonfiberboy 06-11-20 11:13 AM


Originally Posted by bobin (Post 21528091)
Thanks everyone for the advice here! I'm totally gong to see a doc.

I went out for a good 25mi ride yesterday on two days rest and fueled pretty good. Other than a super tough 3 min stretch I took it pretty easy. My average HR for the whole ride was 135 with occasional peaks up into 160s. Had the following symptoms afterward:

I always feel pretty good initially when I get done - but as the night goes on I get increasingly grumpy and impatient. By the time I went to bed around 11pm, I felt pretty fatigued. I'm always able to fall asleep with a good audiobook - but I always wake up a couple hours later and I just toss and turn the rest of the night. It's like one or two hour sleep then 1 hour awake.

Recently though what's keeping me awake is a strange feeling in my chest. I've never had the feeling/sensation before of "feeling my heart pumping". It feels so weird it keeps me up deep breathing - especially when I lay on either side. It does not seem irregular or fluttering - it's just unnerving to feel it pumping. So yeah going in to the doc as soon as I can. Probably time to just keep it light and easy.

I know I'm in good condition when I can lie there and feel each heartbeat strongly, like enough to shake my chest. If it feels weak and thin, I'm usually overcooked or out of shape. I thought I had a heart problem a few years ago when I couldn't get my HR over 105 no matter what I did. Really scared me. Turned out I was massively overcooked from taking the tandem on a hub and spoke bike tour in hilly terrain and riding maxed out 3 days in a row. Cardiologist put my on a treadmill, told me my numbers were those of a fit 43 y.o. I think I was 70. More further up in my response to MoAlpha.

MoAlpha 06-11-20 11:34 AM


Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy (Post 21528197)
At what point, do you think? My normal, fit resting HR has been 46 for many years. If I'm out of shape it'll get all the way up to 50. I'm 74. I have an ultracyclist riding buddy, ~10 years younger, whose resting HR has been 40 for so long he had it inscribed on his Road ID. He developed Afib, like you say. Another friend developed Afib right at my current age, super fit and fast, ran a 4:17 mile in his 20s, never stopped training. I haven't had a symptom. I do have a partial left bundle branch block, but the cardiologist said I could have had it all my life or developed it when I raced Nordic in my teens, who knows. I don't have high BP or dilated cardiomyopathy. I do have a high calcium score, which as you noted is common among endurance athletes. The research I have read said that this condition, among this subgroup, is not associated with higher mortality. Apparently the plaque is of a different quality and doesn't disintegrate. Or so they say. Opinion? My will is up to date. :) My FTP is 160w and I've done long endurance rides, like 150 miles, 10,000', that sort of thing, every year since I was 52. This year everything's cancelled, which in a way is lucky since I have a horrible saddle sore and can't ride much. I'm running instead.

I don't know and I'm not sure anyone does. I learned this in a lay article and it was a while ago. I'm not even sure the mechanism is known.

Anecdotally, I have a sailing friend in his late 60s who is no athlete, but has a sinus rate in the 40s due to some unknown cause. He is moving his boat from the Chesapeake to Maine because the heat puts him more or less reliably into an atrial dysrhythmia of some sortócan't remember if it's a-fib or atrial tachycardia.

Did I say high calcium scores were high among endurance athletes? I don't have any meta-knowledge of that knowledge. :)

Jack Tone 06-11-20 11:44 AM

For what it's worth, I'm 69, have been an athlete all my life. Since high school, football, runner, motocross, bicycle racing, then when I had to support a family, letter carrier walking 15 plus miles a day. I had a resting HR in the mid 30's and it would stop for up to 4 seconds at a time about six months ago. Had a pacemaker put in. Then an ablation to get rid of atrial flutter. I still have afib and take pills to help that.

Carbonfiberboy 06-11-20 11:46 AM


Originally Posted by MoAlpha (Post 21528245)
I don't know and I'm not sure anyone does. I learned this in a lay article and it was a while ago. I'm not even sure the mechanism is known.

Anecdotally, I have a sailing friend in his late 60s who is no athlete, but has a sinus rate in the 40s due to some unknown cause. He is moving his boat from the Chesapeake to Maine because the heat puts him more or less reliably into an atrial dysrhythmia of some sortócan't remember if it's a-fib or atrial tachycardia.

Did I say high calcium scores were high among endurance athletes? I don't have any meta-knowledge of that knowledge. :)

Sorry, misremembered. It was jrobe upthread.

gt3racerich 06-11-20 03:00 PM


Originally Posted by bobin (Post 21528091)
Thanks everyone for the advice here! I'm totally gong to see a doc.



Recently though what's keeping me awake is a strange feeling in my chest. I've never had the feeling/sensation before of "feeling my heart pumping". It feels so weird it keeps me up deep breathing - especially when I lay on either side. It does not seem irregular or fluttering - it's just unnerving to feel it pumping. So yeah going in to the doc as soon as I can. Probably time to just keep it light and easy.

I have had the same sensation (feeling my heart pumping) on and off for five plus years. I have been to several cardiologists and none of them have a clue as to what it is, like they have never heard of it before and reading the above is the first time I have ever heard of someone else having it. Everything else checks out fine and they say it is nothing to worry about but I know it is not normal. Please let me know if your doctor can shed any light on it.

bobin 07-03-20 04:44 PM


Originally Posted by gt3racerich (Post 21528626)
I have had the same sensation (feeling my heart pumping) on and off for five plus years. I have been to several cardiologists and none of them have a clue as to what it is, like they have never heard of it before and reading the above is the first time I have ever heard of someone else having it. Everything else checks out fine and they say it is nothing to worry about but I know it is not normal. Please let me know if your doctor can shed any light on it.

Had a virtual visit with the doc today. His theory is that I'm under/improperly fueled - and that how I'm metabolizing food/fuel is off in some way. Since I don't have any shortness of breath on the bike and no problems during a workout (it's only a couple/few hours later when I try to sleep that my chest feels weird) - he thinks it's not heart-related. So I'm going to pursue the nutrition angle for now and leave the cardiac angle alone.

He did order me a cardiac stress test. I was ready to set that up - but I don't think I can bring myself to be inside a hospital/doc office for over an hour right now in the middle of a pandemic spike. Since it doesn't happen unless I get into SS/V02 HR zones, I think I'm just not going to push it on the bike until Covid calms down. This totally sucks because I've never had more time to bike in a long long time, but at least I can do a resistance workout and keep my HR under 120 and not have any symptoms like described above.

Carbonfiberboy 07-03-20 05:01 PM


Originally Posted by gt3racerich (Post 21528626)
I have had the same sensation (feeling my heart pumping) on and off for five plus years. I have been to several cardiologists and none of them have a clue as to what it is, like they have never heard of it before and reading the above is the first time I have ever heard of someone else having it. Everything else checks out fine and they say it is nothing to worry about but I know it is not normal. Please let me know if your doctor can shed any light on it.

I've had that feeling from time to time and always when resting for maybe 20 years. It's just that my heart has become very muscular - thick ventricular walls. Of course I feel that. I can feel it right now just sitting here, and feel the blood pumping up through my neck. If I concentrate, I can feel it in my ears. I think it's normal for a trained individual.

Carbonfiberboy 07-03-20 05:21 PM


Originally Posted by bobin (Post 21567789)
Had a virtual visit with the doc today. His theory is that I'm under/improperly fueled - and that how I'm metabolizing food/fuel is off in some way. Since I don't have any shortness of breath on the bike and no problems during a workout (it's only a couple/few hours later when I try to sleep that my chest feels weird) - he thinks it's not heart-related. So I'm going to pursue the nutrition angle for now and leave the cardiac angle alone.

He did order me a cardiac stress test. I was ready to set that up - but I don't think I can bring myself to be inside a hospital/doc office for over an hour right now in the middle of a pandemic spike. Since it doesn't happen unless I get into SS/V02 HR zones, I think I'm just not going to push it on the bike until Covid calms down. This totally sucks because I've never had more time to bike in a long long time, but at least I can do a resistance workout and keep my HR under 120 and not have any symptoms like described above.

Good call. Your heart will do a lot better if you don't get Covid.

Fueling: no harm in experimenting. Try taking a couple 500/250 calcium/magnesium tabs an hour before riding, then one more right after the ride. That'll take care of any possible calcium ion issues. Before the ride, drink 15g of whey protein and 10g sugar in plain water, same thing after the ride. That'll take care of any nutrition issues at least on rides of 1-2 hours. More than take care of them. Unless of course your diet forbids sugar because you're seriously hypoglycemic.

UsedToBeFaster 07-03-20 07:03 PM

Aren't you just...
 
Cranky old B's like the rest of us.

now get off my lawn!


Originally Posted by Catsharp (Post 21396296)
This is really interesting because its the first time Iíve seen moodiness/irritability mentioned in association with the after effects of overtraining, or simply extended over-exerting. Iíve had the exact same experience. (Age 61) Have obviously modified and reduced severity of training regimen and still really enjoy long, exhausting rides (seems silly to admit it- as I cannot really explain that to non-riding friends but anyway). Recovery time needed is much greater now; more rest, and more time between intervals but the touchy mood, that is really an annoying and surprising by product.


Originally Posted by bobin (Post 21396023)
I think I just need to enjoy cycling for a chance to get outside and exercise and not push it anymore. I'm nearing 50 and have only been cycling for 6 years but for the life of me can't get my FTP above 200. Thought I was digging a hole last year so this winter really took it easy and tried to rest up over the winter. Last few rides I've been tried to start two or three 15mi rides averaging 120bpm per week. Any time though I get on Zwift or outside and try to really hit it hard for longer than an hour - not only am I wiped out - but it feels like I'm hungover a little the next day. Back to why I took it easy over the winter. My grumpiness just skyrockets the next day. Yesterday I went out for 25 miles and averaged 145bpm often times hitting 175 and it felt good with an average of almost 18mph/200w. Good lord was I moody and wiped out mentally today. Not so much physical fatigue but like my window of tolerance is zero - like I'm strung out or something. Been getting some pretty good sleep lately too. And now that we're quarantined inside all the time I need to be in a good mood for the wife and kids. Not sure what's going on here - going to miss cranking up the engine - but maybe the engine is trying to tell me something.


JohnJ80 07-03-20 08:10 PM


Originally Posted by bobin (Post 21567789)
Had a virtual visit with the doc today. His theory is that I'm under/improperly fueled - and that how I'm metabolizing food/fuel is off in some way. Since I don't have any shortness of breath on the bike and no problems during a workout (it's only a couple/few hours later when I try to sleep that my chest feels weird) - he thinks it's not heart-related. So I'm going to pursue the nutrition angle for now and leave the cardiac angle alone.

He did order me a cardiac stress test. I was ready to set that up - but I don't think I can bring myself to be inside a hospital/doc office for over an hour right now in the middle of a pandemic spike. Since it doesn't happen unless I get into SS/V02 HR zones, I think I'm just not going to push it on the bike until Covid calms down. This totally sucks because I've never had more time to bike in a long long time, but at least I can do a resistance workout and keep my HR under 120 and not have any symptoms like described above.

if your doc felt your condition warranted a cardiac stress test, the LAST thing Iíd do is delay getting that done - COVID or not.

Voodoo76 07-04-20 04:16 PM

Try spending the summer increasing volume rather than intensity, if you have the free time in the day. Instead of targeting another hour ride at more watts shoot for 1.5 or 2hr at less. Volume progression can do wonders, and is much less likely to cause you to over reach or stress out. However with longer rides you have to eat/drink.

delbiker1 07-04-20 05:16 PM

I cut back on the mileage and a bit on intensity. I had a bout of IBS and I have issues with heat stress. I do not take many days completely off, but a couple of days a week I do a slow, casual ride of 10 to 15 miles with a couple of stops. This time of year, unless it is a relatively cool temp outside, I get my ride in early a.m. and off the bike usually by 9, definitely by ten. Today I am feeling good and ready for a longer, but still slower paced ride with stops. Tomorrow, Sunday the 5th, the morning is looking really nice with a light,cooling SE breeze coming off the ocean.

MoAlpha 07-04-20 05:32 PM


Originally Posted by gt3racerich (Post 21528626)
I have had the same sensation (feeling my heart pumping) on and off for five plus years. I have been to several cardiologists and none of them have a clue as to what it is, like they have never heard of it before and reading the above is the first time I have ever heard of someone else having it. Everything else checks out fine and they say it is nothing to worry about but I know it is not normal. Please let me know if your doctor can shed any light on it.

I used to have that: rapid, pounding heartbeat at night. Clearly some sort of sympathetic > parasympathetic imbalance, like a dose of epinephrine or atropine. It was virtually always related to alcohol, even very moderate amounts, so I cut way back and it’s gone. I believe a it’s pretty well known effect.

big john 07-05-20 08:59 AM

When I get rapid heartbeat at night it's because of a hard effort with dehydration. It's annoying trying to sleep when your heart is thumping fast and loud.

big john 07-05-20 09:02 AM


Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy (Post 21528197)
At what point, do you think? My normal, fit resting HR has been 46 for many years. If I'm out of shape it'll get all the way up to 50. I'm 74. I have an ultracyclist riding buddy, ~10 years younger, whose resting HR has been 40 for so long he had it inscribed on his Road ID. He developed Afib, like you say. Another friend developed Afib right at my current age, super fit and fast, ran a 4:17 mile in his 20s, never stopped training. I haven't had a symptom. I do have a partial left bundle branch block, but the cardiologist said I could have had it all my life or developed it when I raced Nordic in my teens, who knows. I don't have high BP or dilated cardiomyopathy. I do have a high calcium score, which as you noted is common among endurance athletes. The research I have read said that this condition, among this subgroup, is not associated with higher mortality. Apparently the plaque is of a different quality and doesn't disintegrate. Or so they say. Opinion? My will is up to date. :) My FTP is 160w and I've done long endurance rides, like 150 miles, 10,000', that sort of thing, every year since I was 52. This year everything's cancelled, which in a way is lucky since I have a horrible saddle sore and can't ride much. I'm running instead.

Have you read Zinn's book? https://www.velopress.com/books/the-haywire-heart/


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