Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Hints and tricks thread

Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Hints and tricks thread

Old 09-21-16, 12:58 PM
  #576  
kirkplan
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 13
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Nice thread
kirkplan is offline  
Old 10-18-16, 11:12 AM
  #577  
Greggster
Senior Member
 
Greggster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 57

Bikes: 80/90's Specialized Crossroads (3), '91 Miyata Triplecross, '91 Bianchi Boardwalk, 2002 Schwinn Frontier, 2002 Gary Fisher Tarpon, 2009 Trek FX 7.2, 2014 Motobecane 400 HT

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Trying to toe-in your brake pads so they don't squeal? It's had to reach around between the fork and rim to fiddle with the pitch. Grab a medium sized zip-tie and trim off the slim leader. Loosen the nut, and use the zip-tie to lift the back end of the pad while squeezing the brake lever, and tighten the nut.
Greggster is offline  
Old 10-22-16, 04:23 AM
  #578  
sjanzeir
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
Posts: 381

Bikes: 1990 Raleigh Flyer; 2014 Trek 7.6 FX (size 15"); 2014 Trek 7.6 FX (size 17.5"); 2014 Dahon Speed D8; 2015 Dahon Mu D8

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 132 Post(s)
- The cones on the front axle of my Feida didn't come with lock nuts, so keeping the cones in proper adjustment was a real nuisance every time I unmounted and remounted the wheel. With the lock nuts on, the fork turned out to be too narrow for the axle to fit, so I used another axle rod to spread the fork out a little; I spun the mounting nuts onto the rod backwards (the washer sides facing outward,) placed the rod in the dropouts, and turned the nuts outwards until the two blades were split wide enough to accommodate a mounted axle.

- Because of the scarcity of bikes that use them, 20x1-3/8 (37-451) tubes - and tires, for that matter - are rare and extremely hard to source locally mainly because very few shops stock them due to the lack of demand. So when I asked one Indian repair man near my house to find me a couple of tubes for the Feida, what he managed to get me instead was a pair of 22x1-3/8 tubes! When I told him sternly that these would be too big, he taught me this neat trick of tucking the tube in on itself until it's the right circumference for the tire:









You can get the tube to be as short as you want with one or more knots like these - within reason, of course.
sjanzeir is offline  
Old 11-16-16, 11:24 AM
  #579  
woodcraft
Senior Member
 
woodcraft's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Nor Cal
Posts: 4,068
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 969 Post(s)
Why isn't there a cassette lockring tool available with a handle?

Here's a quick attempt.

Used a heat gun to soften the PVC fitting & pressed it onto the tool.

The fittings are not glued so far.

Only used a couple of times now, but works.

I think a pivoting handle- like a breaker bar- would be good.


Edit: In use for almost a year. I recently shortened the handle to 1' to fit with the rim size better, & glued the elbow.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
IMG_1817.jpg (94.1 KB, 912 views)

Last edited by woodcraft; 10-28-17 at 07:59 PM.
woodcraft is offline  
Old 11-16-16, 11:32 AM
  #580  
joejack951
Senior Member
 
joejack951's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Wilmington, DE
Posts: 11,853

Bikes: 2016 Hong Fu FM-079-F, 1984 Trek 660, 2003 Specialized Hardrock, 2004 LOOK KG386i (RIP), 2005 Iron Horse Warrior Expert, 2009 Pedal Force CX1, 2016 Islabikes Beinn 20 (son's)

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1116 Post(s)
Originally Posted by woodcraft View Post
Why isn't there a cassette lockring tool available with a handle?

Here's a quick attempt.

Used a heat gun to soften the PVC fitting & pressed it onto the tool.

The fittings are not glued so far.

Only used a couple of times now, but works.

I think a pivoting handle- like a breaker bar- would be good.
Just one of many found on a Google image search: Lockring Tool with Handle | Park Tool
joejack951 is offline  
Old 11-16-16, 11:35 AM
  #581  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 8,361

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Moto Fantom29 ProSL hardtail

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Well there is the Park FR-FH, but I couldn't find it on the Park website, maybe it's discontinued.

So when you heated and pressed, did that create grooves in the plastic to hold the tool really firmly? I have a bike that I have never been able to get the lockring off, I've tried standing on the wrench (and holding the chain-whip at the same time), no go. I think at an extreme like that, a plastic tool would break, but for a lot of cases, that seems like a great idea.

EDIT: joejack found it. I was looking for fr-Fh instead of 5h, because of typo on treefortbikes.com.
RubeRad is offline  
Old 11-16-16, 11:46 AM
  #582  
woodcraft
Senior Member
 
woodcraft's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Nor Cal
Posts: 4,068
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 969 Post(s)
Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
Well there is the Park FR-FH, but I couldn't find it on the Park website, maybe it's discontinued.

So when you heated and pressed, did that create grooves in the plastic to hold the tool really firmly? I have a bike that I have never been able to get the lockring off, I've tried standing on the wrench (and holding the chain-whip at the same time), no go. I think at an extreme like that, a plastic tool would break, but for a lot of cases, that seems like a great idea.

EDIT: joejack found it. I was looking for fr-Fh instead of 5h, because of typo on treefortbikes.com.


Huh. Never seen that for sale in a store or on line, nor noticed one in a shop.

My improvisation wouldn't be good for extreme cases, but has managed a couple of routine cassette changes.
woodcraft is offline  
Old 11-20-16, 08:25 PM
  #583  
spike420211
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 21

Bikes: trek 800 sport, K2 nomad

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Originally Posted by woodcraft View Post
Why isn't there a cassette lockring tool available with a handle?

Here's a quick attempt.

Used a heat gun to soften the PVC fitting & pressed it onto the tool.

The fittings are not glued so far.

Only used a couple of times now, but works.

I think a pivoting handle- like a breaker bar- would be good.
Originally Posted by joejack951 View Post
Just one of many found on a Google image search: Lockring Tool with Handle | Park Tool
Another option:
get a crowfoot wrench that fits one of the lockring tools [mine is 1"]. This will allow use of any pivoting/fixed breaker bar.
You'll still need a chain whip and a cheater pipe, but that cassette WILL come off...
spike420211 is offline  
Old 11-29-16, 10:54 PM
  #584  
ksisler
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 1,718
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
For any electrical or signal connectors and "contacts anywhere", recommend "Dielectric Compound" available at most home stores and many hardware stores. Of course you can buy it on Amazon, eBay, etc., also. It doesn't make a mess, is easy to apply, etc., and 30 years from now if you loosen a connection you will see it still there working properly and the contacts will still be shiny as new.
ksisler is offline  
Old 11-29-16, 10:58 PM
  #585  
ksisler
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 1,718
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
For any electrical or signal connectors and "contacts anywhere", recommend "Dielectric Compound" available at most home stores and many hardware stores. Of course you can buy it on Amazon, eBay, etc., also. It doesn't make a mess, is easy to apply, etc., and 30 years from now if you loosen a connection you will see it still there working properly and the contacts will still be shiny as new.

---------------------------------------
Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops View Post
I thought it would be a good thing to have a thread where people post and discuss little tricks they came up, during the course of their cycling and bike-repair experience.

One trick I have: I noticed that, no matter how good the rubber insulation on the battery lid of the cyclecomputer, in the Finnish wintery rains, at least a tiny little bit of water will make its way in, and cause a little bit of condensate inside. That might be just a cosmetic problem, or it could drain your battery's life, depending on the amount and place of condensation. This is even much more pronounced with bike lights, where the water can find much larger "holes" on the lid (much longer edge), and the insulation is usually worse than with cyclecomputers.

My solution is to put a little bit of lithium grease on the strategic places. Lithium grease is hydro-repellant and very stable. Together with the existing insulation, it will provide nearly 100% security against water infiltrations. Try to avoid getting it on the contacts with the cradle, even though it's not critical.
ksisler is offline  
Old 11-29-16, 11:04 PM
  #586  
wroomwroomoops
Sir Fallalot
Thread Starter
 
wroomwroomoops's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Helsinki, Finland
Posts: 5,277
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Originally Posted by ksisler View Post
For any electrical or signal connectors and "contacts anywhere", recommend "Dielectric Compound" available at most home stores and many hardware stores. Of course you can buy it on Amazon, eBay, etc., also. It doesn't make a mess, is easy to apply, etc., and 30 years from now if you loosen a connection you will see it still there working properly and the contacts will still be shiny as new.

---------------------------------------
Are you talking about the self-curing silicone goop?
wroomwroomoops is offline  
Old 11-29-16, 11:07 PM
  #587  
ksisler
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 1,718
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops View Post
Are you talking about the self-curing silicone goop?
Nope. If you get dielectric compound it will be a light creamy white paste that looks sort of like lithium grease. It never hardens or cures.
ksisler is offline  
Old 02-10-17, 04:09 AM
  #588  
rigidan
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 30
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Best thread.. That PVC pipe lockring is great, we just chopped and used an old downtube..
rigidan is offline  
Old 02-12-17, 08:16 PM
  #589  
elcraft
elcraft
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Greater Boston
Posts: 601
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 52 Post(s)
Originally Posted by ksisler View Post
Nope. If you get dielectric compound it will be a light creamy white paste that looks sort of like lithium grease. It never hardens or cures.
This compound is used in plumbing connections, especially water heaters. Where the steel connector joins with copper pipe, electrolytic corrosion occurs more dramatically. You can find this in the plumbing section of your home center, usually next to the water heaters. I use it for electrical connections that are exposed to weather, as in an automobile. Nice stuff!
elcraft is offline  
Old 02-12-17, 11:50 PM
  #590  
ksisler
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 1,718
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
elcraft; Not quite really. Let me add to to expand the post.

The paste dielectric compound would not be acceptable for the plumbing connections of a hot water heater. It would fail inspection. The code required items are called dielectric couplers, one for each line. About $5 a pair at any home or hardware store. They are about 3-4 inches long and screw into the threaded fittings on the tank. Then the plumbing lines (typically copper) connect to them. These couplers have a non-conducting center section and a vinyl lining which prevents the electrons from flowing between the dissembler metals (which is what used to cause the iron tank to rust out on the inside and burst during thermal cycling). The paste will not prevent the two different metals from touching and thus worthless for that use. Refer to the US Residential House code. I think this standard kicked in about 1985 or so, mostly due to pressure from insurance companies who were getting killed by water damage claims. There may be a use for the paste in a electric water heater such as on the wiring connections to the heating element (which it would be for as found near water heaters in the store).

The intended use for the paste DiE is for the electrical connections such as those you mention; Any connection exposed to weather or water/moisture and is awesome for the threads or pins of any light bulb anywhere, trailer connector, cable and satellite antenna, etc. I believe there is a slightly different compound required for boats, airplanes, etc.

Yes agreed, nice stuff. I always have tubes of it in my tool bags.

Originally Posted by elcraft View Post
This compound is used in plumbing connections, especially water heaters. Where the steel connector joins with copper pipe, electrolytic corrosion occurs more dramatically. You can find this in the plumbing section of your home center, usually next to the water heaters. I use it for electrical connections that are exposed to weather, as in an automobile. Nice stuff!
ksisler is offline  
Old 02-14-17, 10:19 PM
  #591  
elcraft
elcraft
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Greater Boston
Posts: 601
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 52 Post(s)
I stand corrected.....

Originally Posted by ksisler View Post
elcraft; Not quite really. Let me add to to expand the post.

The paste dielectric compound would not be acceptable for the plumbing connections of a hot water heater. It would fail inspection. The code required items are called dielectric couplers, one for each line. About $5 a pair at any home or hardware store. They are about 3-4 inches long and screw into the threaded fittings on the tank. Then the plumbing lines (typically copper) connect to them. These couplers have a non-conducting center section and a vinyl lining which prevents the electrons from flowing between the dissembler metals (which is what used to cause the iron tank to rust out on the inside and burst during thermal cycling). The paste will not prevent the two different metals from touching and thus worthless for that use. Refer to the US Residential House code. I think this standard kicked in about 1985 or so, mostly due to pressure from insurance companies who were getting killed by water damage claims. There may be a use for the paste in a electric water heater such as on the wiring connections to the heating element (which it would be for as found near water heaters in the store).

The intended use for the paste DiE is for the electrical connections such as those you mention; Any connection exposed to weather or water/moisture and is awesome for the threads or pins of any light bulb anywhere, trailer connector, cable and satellite antenna, etc. I believe there is a slightly different compound required for boats, airplanes, etc.

Yes agreed, nice stuff. I always have tubes of it in my tool bags.
I guess I received some inadequate info from the guys in the home center's plumbing section! I am glad you clarified that for me.
elcraft is offline  
Old 02-26-17, 02:54 PM
  #592  
Nelly67
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Bristol
Posts: 2

Bikes: GT Palomar mountain bike (from 2000, still my favourite) my dry bike, Land Rover Windsor hybrid (my wet bike), 2 foldies, a 1980 tandem.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Just a couple for now....

When replacing a punctured tube, make sure you cannot possibly mix up the new with the old. I did this on a freezing cold rainy night, with a rear puncture, bolts not QR axle then, bike was laden with heavy panniers, tried to rush it and managed to refit the old tube. You don't fall for this one again in a hurry!

If you snap your QR back axle, don't take all the spacers and nuts off before replacing, it's then much harder to work out the spacing (also don't put the freewheel back on until you have tested the wheel in place).

And remember, hindsight is always 20/20. Live, learn and share.

More to follow.....

Last edited by Nelly67; 02-26-17 at 02:58 PM.
Nelly67 is offline  
Old 02-28-17, 03:43 PM
  #593  
ctpres 
Senior Member
 
ctpres's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Creede CO in summer & Okeechobee, FL or TX Gulf Coast in winter
Posts: 741

Bikes: Zenetto Stealth road bike & Sundeal M7 MTN bike

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 89 Post(s)
"Third Eye Pro Helmet Bicycle Mirror" just won't stay in place on bumpy roads. Have tried many solutions and none worked long enough to be worth it. I finally think I have problem solved. I tried "Finish Line Fiber Grip Carbon Fiber Bicycle Assembly Gel" on both helmet end pivot points. ROCK solid for days now!
__________________
Retired 79 YO. Got my sub 5 ET century at 50 and sub 7 RT at 75. Just want to finish sub 10 RT at 80. USNR, USAF, USCGA - riding 2014 Zenetto Stealth ZR7.1 Carbon on the road in flatland & 2017 Sundeal M7 for the mountains. Train HI - Creede Co in summer and ride low - Texas Gulf Coast in winter. Life is good.
ctpres is online now  
Old 03-01-17, 01:40 PM
  #594  
ksisler
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 1,718
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
EJ; Huge amount of truth in your post. Thanks. I use the DAG and several other Park tools (and/or Campy equals) to check all aspects of the frame and fork alignment before building up a new ride and to correct friends rides that are wonky. I continue to be amazed at the percentage of new and old frames that are completely wacked... It takes a bit of time to set them right using the proper tools, but then often they have none of those weird problems that so many folks run into and painfully post their needs to the Bike Forums.... /K

=====================================
Originally Posted by El Julioso View Post
Do everything in the most logical order.

Clean your bench before you begin working. Set a space aside for parts you're working with, so you won't lose them. Especially important when working with small screws and bearings.

Make sure the wheels are both straight in the dropouts and true before you adjust the brakes. Otherwise, you may waste your time tuning the brakes initially, because you'll have to reset and/or true the rim and then adjust the brakes again afterwards. This also applies when using the Park Tool DAG-1; if the rear wheel is crooked, so will be the derailleur hanger if you use the wheel as reference.

Make sure any part you're working with is in good condition before reinstalling it. If it's likely to cause problems, fix or replace the part now.

If a bike is giving you a really hard time, relax, kick back, have a beer, and try to think of a creative solution. Preferably more creative than just using brute force Subtract the beer if you're working at a shop, and have it after work instead. One example of changing the order of things depending on the particular circumstances.

Never, ever half-ass anything. If you do, it will come back to haunt you. Spend that little bit of extra time doing it right the first and only time, and you won't have to worry about it later. In the long run, this approach will save you time and headaches, and will also keep customers very happy. The only customer I've had come back with a problem with a bike I had worked on (aside from those who've broken or worn something of their own accord) was one with a disconnected front V-brake... I had disconnected the brake in order to remove the front wheel for transportation in her car. I assumed that she knew how to re-attach it Now I make sure customers know before seeing them off. Live and learn.
ksisler is offline  
Old 03-02-17, 03:48 PM
  #595  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 8,361

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Moto Fantom29 ProSL hardtail

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Hi Brad,

Welcome to BF, but this is not really the right place. Hints&tricks is more for if you have an answer than if you have a question.

Mechanics is the right subforum though, you can just go there and click "New Thread" to post your question.
RubeRad is offline  
Old 03-02-17, 04:12 PM
  #596  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 36,049

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 121 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4331 Post(s)
Originally Posted by BradClark View Post
I knew it. Unfortunately I don't think I have permissions to start a new thread. I got a message saying I need to have 10 posts before starting a new thread (being a newbie). I'll give it another try. Sorry.
I believe you're misinterpreting the rules.

Newbies start new threads all the time in the mechanic's forum. And, coming to ask about a problem is often the very reason newbs are here in the first place.

I believe the restrictions are related to posting links (and possibly photos), to keep spammers from coming here posting links to all kinds of malware.

So, go back and repost in the mechanics thread, and you'll probably get answers within minute.

To the Mod - I apologize if I'm wrong on the newbs rules, and would appreciate being brought up to date.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 03-02-17, 08:35 PM
  #597  
WizardOfBoz
Generally bewildered
 
WizardOfBoz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Eastern PA, USA
Posts: 1,653

Bikes: 2014 Trek Domane 6.9, 1999 LeMond Zurich, 1978 Schwinn Superior

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 562 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Binky View Post
And another thing:

Penetrating oils....

WD-40 is OK

Kroil is good.

Liquid Wrench is good.

A mixture of 50% Acetone and 50% ATF (automatic transmission fluid) is BEST !!!

Binky
Binky's right: this has actually been tested experimentally.
WizardOfBoz is offline  
Old 04-30-17, 07:43 PM
  #598  
paullouisf
Newbie
 
paullouisf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Ohio
Posts: 3

Bikes: 1970s Itoh

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Originally Posted by twobikes View Post
When your tire with Schrader valve goes flat overnight seemingly for no reason, check to see if the valve core is not tight in the stem. Do this before removing the wheel from the bike and taking the tire off.
My road tires (Schrader valves) lose about one pound per day (90 psi to 60 psi in 30 days). Is this normal for road tires? I will check the valve cores. If not the valve cores, then what else.
paullouisf is offline  
Old 05-01-17, 08:19 AM
  #599  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 8,361

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Moto Fantom29 ProSL hardtail

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Hi paullouisf, see the discussion with BradClark right up there, this thread is not the place to ask new questions, you should go start a New Thread and people will be along with responses.
RubeRad is offline  
Old 06-02-17, 08:18 PM
  #600  
SylvainG
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Ottawa,ON,Canada
Posts: 1,222

Bikes: Schwinn Miranda 1990, Giant TCX 2 2012

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 473 Post(s)
Originally Posted by sickz View Post
most off the shelf cone wrenches are junk. avoid the park double ended ones at all costs. they are virtually one time use.

my best cone wrenches are ground down open ended wrenches. =]
Hold post but currently going through some of them. Found this on Google, adjustable cone wrench

http://www.instructables.com/id/Bicycle-cone-wrench/


Last edited by SylvainG; 06-02-17 at 08:26 PM.
SylvainG is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.