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Old 08-04-19, 04:04 PM
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wrldtraveller
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Post tour

Hey folks,

I just completed my first bike tour, I used Trek Checkpoint ALR 5, outfitted with dual racks. I cycled with two friends starting at Vancouver, B.C. and ended my trip at San Francisco, (my friends went on to San Diego). The reason why I ended my trip while my friends didn't is because I was only permitted 35 days to do this bike trip, and by the time I got to San Francisco, and after a day's rest and exploration of San Francisco, I realized I didn't have enough time to continue. Overall, the trip was very enjoyable, and one thing I would improve this trip, is to ask for more time off so I can have plenty of time to explore and cycle.35 days isn't enough time for me.

Now, my question for you folks, how do you deal with the return to civilization and back to the work routine?

For me, its a strange feeling, everyday I was a very goal oriented, wake up, tear down my tents, eat breakfast, pack my bike, then cycle all day (take breaks for snacks and lunch) then find a campsite for the evening ahead of time, then decide what to eat for supper. Arrive campground, set up everything, cook, eat, then clean up, shower if there is a shower, relax for the evening, maybe go for a walk around campground, or on the beach, then go to sleep at night. Always kept myself occupied mentally. Now its back to reality, so to speak, work, home, eat, etc. and it feels boring, nothing special, and I found myself a bit restless, and difficult to fall asleep at night. is this a normal sensation when you finish a long distance touring on a bike and come back to your home?


The best part of my trip was the high speed descent on some of the hills I had to struggle to get up, and the beautiful views of the coastlines, and the awesome size of the Redwood forest as I rode on the Avenue of the Giants in California, and feeling humbled by the hugeness of the Redwood trees that surrounds the roadway, and the daily sights of pastures, cows, farms, and meeting interesting people of all kinds while on tour.

Curious about anyone's experience and how to get back into the normal albiet boring routine of work/home everyday and how to cope with that.

Paul

Stats: Started June 27th, Ended July 27th.
Miles Cycled: 1269 miles

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Old 08-04-19, 04:41 PM
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Start planning your next trip

It sounds like 35 days was long enough to get into a different rhythm of daily living. I don't get that on a week-long trip and hence one thing I've enjoyed about more extended journeys. Having a goal also helps me.

As far as shifting back to the non-cycling life goes, "plan the next trip" was half in jest. In addition, I've still done short overnight trips and increased cycle commuting (including staying car-free since my 2001 12-month long journey).
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Old 08-04-19, 05:13 PM
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Right now I am tempted to do a weekend trip, but my bike right now needs a tune up after that pacific coast trip, so its scheduled to get a new brakes, new tubes, a replacement tires.

P
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Old 08-04-19, 06:09 PM
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Hmmm, first world problems. All my tours have been 2-5 days. I get plenty of Vacay, 5 weeks with sick days, but I do like to spend some not work time with my wife. Maybe up your daily miles? Road, I aim for 50-70 per day, off road/trails/dirt paths tend to be 30-50 mies in a day. I think most 9-5 ers would be jealous. A week , maybe two for most full time working Americans would be pushing it. A teacher, contract worker or maybe a temp type job might have some more flexibility. Just get a big cup of HTFU?
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Old 08-04-19, 06:22 PM
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I have no suggestions, as all my pre-retirement tours were a week long, maybe a couple days beyond a week plus the two weekends that sandwich it. During my professional career, a 35 day vacation would have been unheard of.

But now that I am retired, my last bike tour took me away from home for 39 days. I found it quite easy to get home and pick up where my retirement left off.
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Old 08-04-19, 08:05 PM
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Same. Week at a time, maybe 10 days. It’s long enough for me. Some day I’ll do a longer trip, maybe in New Zealand.
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Old 08-04-19, 09:10 PM
  #7  
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Originally Posted by wrldtraveller View Post
Right now I am tempted to do a weekend trip, but my bike right now needs a tune up after that pacific coast trip, so its scheduled to get a new brakes, new tubes, a replacement tires.

P
This is a serious suggestion--find a bike mechanic workshop, or a bike repair coop, and put some time and effort into learning basic and then more advanced bike mechanic stuff.
It's a total win win, you'll learn new stuff, you'll get to know your bike and all the innards, and most importantly you'll have the confidence to deal with stuff.
Best part too is that keeping your bike in great shape reduces greatly the risk of having problems--all this stuff really handy for a bike tourer.

And it saves money!
I'm serious, look into it.

PS one of my Pacific coast memories was serenely going down a big hill with a tail wind, getting to 80kph, great pavement, wide road, no cars, just me and 50mph bliss.
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Old 08-04-19, 09:19 PM
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well. What I did to get 35 days off, was to work for 3 years with no vacation. eventually I asked, and my boss said sure as I earned that (my boss allows vacation banking and each year is 2 weeks vacation.) anyway, what I learned from this trip, is that I can only do 60 mile day and thats all I can do. maybe because Im out of shape? or maybe its because my bike crankset only has 2 gears and no granny gear. My bike set up is 11 gears in the rear, 2 gears in the front. 50-36 for crank set, 48-12 casette. The first few days my friend tried to go for higher miles, ie: more than 60 miles, my knee protested badly so I had to take a day rest to let my knees recover. then we tried to do 60 miles and realized that I can only do 60 miles, before my knees start protesting. Would I change my bike? no, I like it the way it is, maybe check into if they can add a granny gear to my bike, but its more likely my being not used to a brand new bike because I've used mountain bike for a decade, and this trek bike is the first cyclocross bike I've bought, with drop bars. The only thing I might change is I would add tri bars, and the tires. the tires were too easily punctured as i experienced 4 flat tires in that amount of time I was on vacation. 2 was caused by rough roads (pinch puncture), 1 was caused by a tiny sliver of metal, and one was caused by a 1 dollar bill as my friend put a dollar bill to help protect my tube from further puncture because my tires had several gash and cuts in it.

Did I suffer? no, I enjoyed it, all part of my experience, and now I know, I will do better in the future. As for retirement.... I'd rather enjoy it now than wait until retirement because life is too short to wait. It was on my bucket list that I wanted to do a bike touring trip, and opportunity presented itself when my friend said that he will be doing a pacific coast tour, so I went with him.

But for my next trip, I would do a shorter one, more likely 2 weeks, and what I have in mind, Im still a bit undecided, is to take the Jasper-Banff Parkway route.

Paul
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Old 08-05-19, 12:42 AM
  #9  
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You've had two bits of excellent advice:
Start planning your next tour
Get thee to a bike co-op, or if not available, a cheap bike to work on yourself. It'll do wonders!

And my suggestion: look locally to see where you can go on your bike and throw up a tent. If it's only 10 miles away, so what? Take a long route to get there. And a different one back. Different seasons give different experiences. Check out Warmshowers for possible hosts or weekend buddies.

I'm always curious about the people who do really long tours - a year plus - and how they reintegrate into normal life.

My longest tour has been +/- 3 months to date. Even after my first 2 week tour I found it hard settling down for the simple reason that I was comparing where I was to where I had been. When I started noticing where I was, rather than where I had been, things changed and for the last few years if I wasn't getting away for a weekend at least every month I'd be getting very itchy feet.

Anyway, well done on your first tour!
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Old 08-05-19, 04:38 AM
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Originally Posted by wrldtraveller View Post
Hey folks,

I just completed my first bike tour, I used Trek Checkpoint ALR 5, outfitted with dual racks. I cycled with two friends starting at Vancouver, B.C. and ended my trip at San Francisco, (my friends went on to San Diego). The reason why I ended my trip while my friends didn't is because I was only permitted 35 days to do this bike trip, and by the time I got to San Francisco, and after a day's rest and exploration of San Francisco, I realized I didn't have enough time to continue. Overall, the trip was very enjoyable, and one thing I would improve this trip, is to ask for more time off so I can have plenty of time to explore and cycle.35 days isn't enough time for me.

Now, my question for you folks, how do you deal with the return to civilization and back to the work routine?

For me, its a strange feeling, everyday I was a very goal oriented, wake up, tear down my tents, eat breakfast, pack my bike, then cycle all day (take breaks for snacks and lunch) then find a campsite for the evening ahead of time, then decide what to eat for supper. Arrive campground, set up everything, cook, eat, then clean up, shower if there is a shower, relax for the evening, maybe go for a walk around campground, or on the beach, then go to sleep at night. Always kept myself occupied mentally. Now its back to reality, so to speak, work, home, eat, etc. and it feels boring, nothing special, and I found myself a bit restless, and difficult to fall asleep at night. is this a normal sensation when you finish a long distance touring on a bike and come back to your home?


The best part of my trip was the high speed descent on some of the hills I had to struggle to get up, and the beautiful views of the coastlines, and the awesome size of the Redwood forest as I rode on the Avenue of the Giants in California, and feeling humbled by the hugeness of the Redwood trees that surrounds the roadway, and the daily sights of pastures, cows, farms, and meeting interesting people of all kinds while on tour.

Curious about anyone's experience and how to get back into the normal albiet boring routine of work/home everyday and how to cope with that.

Paul

Stats: Started June 27th, Ended July 27th.
Miles Cycled: 1269 miles

You talk about how do you come back to work after doing a tour, And I can tell you it is not very easy, but what I can tell you that is good, is that , you tend to daydream about your trip a lot, and tend to start planning your next one. Me, being a fulltime soldier, during my working career, I had leave without pay at numerous times, the longest being 12 months, with a 9 month cycle tour, it was very hard coming back to being a soldier fulltime, after being in civi street for all that time, so I tended when I next had time off, went on many mini tours on extended weekends , from working extra weekends at a time. All I can say is take it one day at a time, do your job to the best of your ability, and plan for your next big or little tour. You know it will happen so it wont be so hard to wait.

Last edited by ricrunner; 08-05-19 at 04:49 AM.
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Old 08-05-19, 10:03 AM
  #11  
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Post tour
Originally Posted by wrldtraveller View Post
Hey folks,

I just completed my first bike tour, I used Trek Checkpoint ALR 5, outfitted with dual racks. I cycled with two friends starting at Vancouver, B.C. and ended my trip at San Francisco, (my friends went on to San Diego)…

Now, my question for you folks, how do you deal with the return to civilization and back to the work routine?

For me, its a strange feeling, everyday I was a very goal oriented… Now its back to reality, so to speak, work, home, eat, etc. and it feels boring, nothing special, and I found myself a bit restless, and difficult to fall asleep at night. is this a normal sensation when you finish a long distance touring on a bike and come back to your home?...

Curious about anyone's experience and how to get back into the normal albiet boring routine of work/home everyday and how to cope with that.

Paul
I posted to this thread,” Emotional letdown after tour ends?”
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
On our cross-country honeymoon tour in 1977 [from LA to DC], as I recall, there was a sense of letdown, but not much time to dwell on it as we now arrived in Boston to start new jobs and life in a new city [from Michigan]. Our short period of laziness was three days in Washington DC (our destination) before taking the train to Boston.

There also was a minor let-down as we left the West after the Rocky Mountains since the California and Arizona deserts, and Colorado mountains were such exotic environments for two lifelong Midwesterners who were now descending into more familiar terrain..
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
… so many of the memories are deeply embedded in my mind. Every year beginning on our anniversary on April 30 for the next eight weeks I frequently try to recall where we were at that particular time on that date back in 1977
I do recall thinking on various tours
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
Originally Posted by bikingshearer View Post
A thought or two, based on personal experience....

Also, what's the hurry? One of the joys of touring is the singleness of purpose and absence of demands. All you have to do is get there: you don't have to get there fast or get their first - and if you are touring with camping gear, odds are you can be incredibly flexible about what "getting there" means on any given day.

Embrace that. Don't let your tour become an exercise in trading one rat-race for another.
Though I haven't toured in about 20 years, my wife and I did a cross country ride, and toured in Michigan, Ontario, New England and the Maritimes. … Doesn't that sound like a Great Escape from the usual daily work/commute "rat-race"?

In fact, bad touring days made me long for sitting in an office doing my usual job--very restorative.

Last edited by Jim from Boston; 08-10-19 at 05:03 AM.
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Old 08-05-19, 10:50 AM
  #12  
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Originally Posted by wrldtraveller View Post
well. What I did to get 35 days off, was to work for 3 years with no vacation. eventually I asked, and my boss said sure as I earned that (my boss allows vacation banking and each year is 2 weeks vacation.)
...
That explains how you could take over a month off. Sounds like you have a good boss to allow that.


Originally Posted by wrldtraveller View Post
...
anyway, what I learned from this trip, is that I can only do 60 mile day and thats all I can do. maybe because Im out of shape? or maybe its because my bike crankset only has 2 gears and no granny gear. My bike set up is 11 gears in the rear, 2 gears in the front. 50-36 for crank set, 48-12 casette. The first few days my friend tried to go for higher miles, ie: more than 60 miles, my knee protested badly so I had to take a day rest to let my knees recover. then we tried to do 60 miles and realized that I can only do 60 miles, before my knees start protesting.
....
My knees are much happier now that I have stopped standing on the pedals to accelerate up hills or to accelerate after stopping at stop lights. You have to be careful to avoid over stressing your knees. And 60 miles on a loaded bike is something that a lot of people can't do, so do not feel that it was not enough mileage. My last tour was about five weeks and I had 6 days over 60 miles, none over 70, most less than 60.

The touring bike I used on the Pacific Coast (which has a lot of 8 percent grade hills) had a 24T granny gear and biggest sprocket was 32 in back. That is nearly identical to your 36 in front and 48 in back. So, your lowest gear and my lowest gear on that bike was about the same. My point is that lower gears are nice but you already have a low gear that is comparable to the lowest gear on a lot of touring bikes.


Originally Posted by wrldtraveller View Post
...
The only thing I might change is I would add tri bars, and the tires. the tires were too easily punctured as i experienced 4 flat tires in that amount of time I was on vacation. 2 was caused by rough roads (pinch puncture), 1 was caused by a tiny sliver of metal, and one was caused by a 1 dollar bill as my friend put a dollar bill to help protect my tube from further puncture because my tires had several gash and cuts in it.
....
I would skip the tri bars, but it sounds like you need different tires. I use 35 or 37 or 40mm wide tires on my derailleur touring bikes, unless I am on gravel and then I use 50mm wide.

In all of my bike tours I have only had one puncture on a tour, I picked up a big staple in a rear tire that looked like it was used for construction projects.


Originally Posted by wrldtraveller View Post
...
As for retirement.... I'd rather enjoy it now than wait until retirement because life is too short to wait....
Agree. While I did not do multi-week vacations while working, I did take several weeks off every year.
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Old 08-05-19, 11:00 AM
  #13  
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That first paycheck may help you get back into the swing of things. I know it helped me after taking nearly two years off from the working world to take three extended tours, including one of nearly four months, and pursue other interest. At 35, I knew it was time to get back to the "real world," so the transition was not difficult. Got to get my own place (had been flopping with mom while not travelling) and starts to save for a house.
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Old 08-05-19, 11:39 AM
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We used to call it "Post Opera Depression" when I was doing community opera performances. (POD for short, Post Tour Depression doesn't make a catchy acronym.) After "hell week" (named after fraternity pledge week) in which you were almost completely immersed, finish the last show, help pack up sets and costumes, and show back up to work Monday morning. Without that immersion, we felt adrift for a few weeks. Then it was time to pick up the music for the next show.

Start with a couple weeks of down time, keep your bike rides to <20 miles, let your body recover.

Catch up on all the issues of "Adventure Cyclist" you haven't had time to read.

See if there are any good journals on crazyguy you want to read.

Pick out two-three tours, or touring outfits, that sound interesting, and read about them when you're feeling adrift.

Oh, yeah, pay some attention to that j-o-b thing that's going to give you health insurance during your next tour and the financial wherewithal to do it. Bosses like that. And you want to keep your awesome boss happy!
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Old 08-05-19, 12:04 PM
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Originally Posted by wrldtraveller View Post
Hey folks,

I just completed my first bike tour, I used Trek Checkpoint ALR 5, outfitted with dual racks. I cycled with two friends starting at Vancouver, B.C. and ended my trip at San Francisco, (my friends went on to San Diego). The reason why I ended my trip while my friends didn't is because I was only permitted 35 days to do this bike trip, and by the time I got to San Francisco, and after a day's rest and exploration of San Francisco, I realized I didn't have enough time to continue. Overall, the trip was very enjoyable, and one thing I would improve this trip, is to ask for more time off so I can have plenty of time to explore and cycle.35 days isn't enough time for me.

Now, my question for you folks, how do you deal with the return to civilization and back to the work routine?

For me, its a strange feeling, everyday I was a very goal oriented, wake up, tear down my tents, eat breakfast, pack my bike, then cycle all day (take breaks for snacks and lunch) then find a campsite for the evening ahead of time, then decide what to eat for supper. Arrive campground, set up everything, cook, eat, then clean up, shower if there is a shower, relax for the evening, maybe go for a walk around campground, or on the beach, then go to sleep at night. Always kept myself occupied mentally. Now its back to reality, so to speak, work, home, eat, etc. and it feels boring, nothing special, and I found myself a bit restless, and difficult to fall asleep at night. is this a normal sensation when you finish a long distance touring on a bike and come back to your home?


The best part of my trip was the high speed descent on some of the hills I had to struggle to get up, and the beautiful views of the coastlines, and the awesome size of the Redwood forest as I rode on the Avenue of the Giants in California, and feeling humbled by the hugeness of the Redwood trees that surrounds the roadway, and the daily sights of pastures, cows, farms, and meeting interesting people of all kinds while on tour.

Curious about anyone's experience and how to get back into the normal albiet boring routine of work/home everyday and how to cope with that.

Paul

Stats: Started June 27th, Ended July 27th.
Miles Cycled: 1269 miles

I just go to work. I usually ride there.

The sleep issues you are experiencing are probably due to the nature in which we humans live our lives...i.e. by a clock instead of the sun. On tour I go to bed with the sun and wake up with the sun. At home I go to bed long after the sun is down and wake up before it rises. It's very unnatural and difficult to integrate back into once you get used to the other way of doing it. It will pass.

As for the world being a little dull after a tour, find something to make it brighter. Like I said, I ride to work. I take different routes, I find other things to make my rides interesting.

Originally Posted by wrldtraveller View Post
Right now I am tempted to do a weekend trip, but my bike right now needs a tune up after that pacific coast trip, so its scheduled to get a new brakes, new tubes, a replacement tires.

P
Why does your bike need a tune up. 1300 miles isn't much in the grand scheme of things when it comes to bicycle riding. You probably don't need new brake pads nor tires and certainly don't need new tubes. Unless you were skidding your tires, you probably aren't going to wear out a set of tires in 1300 miles. If you wore out a set of brake pads in that distance, you need to readdress how you are using your brakes.

Your bike probably doesn't need much tuning after even a long tour. Bikes aren't that delicate.
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Old 08-05-19, 11:01 PM
  #16  
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Cycco, why tuneup? well my rear tire is soon bald. I would assume its because the rubber used is soft as my bike is designed to be used on gravel, and has aggressive treads. my brake pads are nearly gone, as I constantly had to brake in order to maintain my speed with my friends. I tend to pedal faster and heavier. Eventually my friends did allow me to take the lead and I left them far behind. So I preferred to keep with my friends as my friends has all the maps, and know how (rookie here...). I am very familiar with how bikes works, but from what I can see, Im not happy with the tire as they did not provide protection from general rough roads. I got tube puncture just by rolling into a gravel turnoff, and got a pinch puncture because the downhill had a rough patch of pavement. And closer inspection shows that the tire has so many tiny gash and cuts. so I decided to replace the tire and tube for a more stronger and durable. based on recommendation from my friend, its Schwalbe Marathon, that I am turing to. I did avoid to use brake during heavy and very fast downhill and am aware of using brakes when going at 50 mph, it will burn up and damage my whole brake calibers, so I just let go, and have fun. and allow the bike to slow down by itself. except for one area, I had to keep using the brake as the road was crazy twisty, and I knew I cannot just let go, so I braked constantly (I tend to switch rear-front, to allow time for them to cool off to avoid overheating)

as for my sleep pattern, I think its because when I was touring, I always woke up just as the sun rose, and when I went to bed, its always just about 10 pm, and because of a long day cycling, very exhausted that the moment my head hit the pillow, im out like a light. Now, Im not exhausted, so it takes time for me to fall asleep.

anyway, thank you all for the suggestions, ideas, and they are awesome.

Paul
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Old 08-06-19, 04:25 AM
  #17  
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Ah, your first experience since childhood actually doing something in life, not just sitting around board, filling your time with what you've been shown that you should be doing... Sucks, doesn't it? The best thing is just try to ignore it. Sitting around at work all day doing the same crap, then going home and sitting on the couch all night doing the same crap isn't going to leave you fulfilled if you think about it. Try not to think about it. Ignorance is bliss.

Otherwise maybe buy a small piece of property in the woods within a couple hours drive and start building yourself something on the weekends? Get something with a creek and build a tiny cabin out of scrap wood and plant a garden? Get into a cool, but cheap hobby? That can be tough since hobbies have a way of getting expensive. What kind of stuff do you like to do? Basically think about what would be actually living to you, and try to add that to your life in some way? Personally, I think that's where the balance lies in our current society.

But I think most people just manage not to think about it too much, focus on something else to avoid that emptiness, get meds from a psychiatrist to cope, etc.
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Old 08-06-19, 06:52 AM
  #18  
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Originally Posted by wrldtraveller View Post
.... my brake pads are nearly gone, ...
Yeah, my pads were pretty much shot when I got home from my Pacific Coast trip. I had one pair (for one wheel) spare pads with me on the trip but did not replace until I got home.

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Old 08-06-19, 08:26 AM
  #19  
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Just to be clear, I am trying to be helpful so if I come across as combative, that is not my intent.

None of what you are doing should require a shop to do. It's all stuff that is simple to fix at home.

Originally Posted by wrldtraveller View Post
Cycco, why tuneup? well my rear tire is soon bald. I would assume its because the rubber used is soft as my bike is designed to be used on gravel, and has aggressive treads.
Tires are something that wear out but if you put new rubber on the bike when you started, you shouldn't have worn them out in 1300 miles. You might want to do a little research for tires that wear better before you replace the ones you have with the same brand and model. Even knobbed tires last longer than 1300 miles.

Also, putting a tire on a bike is something that every cyclist should know how to do. If you can fix a flat, you can change a tire. You just have to take the tire off both the wheel entirely instead of only one side. By all means buy the tire from your local shop but you don't need to wait the typical 2 weeks that bike shops are taking for repairs to be back out on the road.

Originally Posted by wrldtraveller View Post
my brake pads are nearly gone, as I constantly had to brake in order to maintain my speed with my friends. I tend to pedal faster and heavier. Eventually my friends did allow me to take the lead and I left them far behind. So I preferred to keep with my friends as my friends has all the maps, and know how (rookie here...).
I ride with slower people all the time but I don't ride my brakes. Brake pads typically last me several thousand miles and, usually, several years. When I do change a pad, I seldom remember how long it has been. It is a skill to ride with slower riders but if they are dragging brakes on downhills, meet them at the bottom.

Originally Posted by wrldtraveller View Post
I am very familiar with how bikes works, but from what I can see, Im not happy with the tire as they did not provide protection from general rough roads. I got tube puncture just by rolling into a gravel turnoff, and got a pinch puncture because the downhill had a rough patch of pavement.
Pinch flats are an indicator that you are running the tire pressure too low. I'm a big guy. I'm an aggressive rider who doesn't shy away from bombing single track. I seldom get pinch flats because I keep my tires inflated. Don't try to make your tires do the cushioning when you ride in rough terrain. Either use suspension on the bike or use the shock absorbers you have at your ready 24 hours a day...your arms and legs. Even with suspension, your arms and legs are going to do most of the work absorbing impacts.

Another point on pinch flats (or riding with low pressure tubeless), they are indicative of your rim impacting whatever hole or rock that you are hitting. If your rim is hitting that hole or rock, you risk damaging the rim. Is a little bit of comfort worth the $100 or more repair to the wheel? Pump the tires up!

Originally Posted by wrldtraveller View Post
And closer inspection shows that the tire has so many tiny gash and cuts. so I decided to replace the tire and tube for a more stronger and durable. based on recommendation from my friend, its Schwalbe Marathon, that I am turing to.
Replace the tire, sure. But tubes can outlast hundreds of tires. I regularly see tubes at my local co-op that are inside 40 year old rotten tires that are still usable. I patch tubes until the point of ridicule...my wife made me throw away one with 35 patches on it. She was probably correct because at that point there was more patch then tube but I could have done more. Tubes are also just tubes. If you spend more, you probably won't get any better quality and you certainly won't get better protection against flats of any kind.

Originally Posted by wrldtraveller View Post
I did avoid to use brake during heavy and very fast downhill and am aware of using brakes when going at 50 mph, it will burn up and damage my whole brake calibers, so I just let go, and have fun. and allow the bike to slow down by itself. except for one area, I had to keep using the brake as the road was crazy twisty, and I knew I cannot just let go, so I braked constantly (I tend to switch rear-front, to allow time for them to cool off to avoid overheating)
No, your brakes won't burn up at over 50mph. Nor will it damage your calipers. I've been to that point many times with many different brakes. The calipers are far from delicate.

I would also suggest a different braking approach then to switch from front to rear and back. Pulse brake, instead. To pulse brake, use both brakes but use them in pulses. Hit the brakes hard, scrub speed, then get off the brakes, and repeat as needed. The time in between pulses can vary but, for the most part, you won't overheat as much as constantly dragging one or the other brake and you'll have more control of your speed.

Pulse braking works for cantilevers, sidepulls, discs and spoonbrakes (I think but I'd never use a spoonbrake). I use it all the time and that's how I can get years of use out of a brake.

Finally, as with tires, replacing brake pads is relatively simple. Rim brakes can be a little complicated but if you have disc pads, those are dead simple. Just pull them out and push in new pads.
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Old 08-06-19, 11:07 PM
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Vancouver to San Francisco is pretty epic for a first tour! Bike touring is rather addicting (in a good way)...maybe it's those exercise endorphins. I don't have special advice for post-tour, for me there's stuff to catch up with so I guess that's something of a distraction.
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Old 08-07-19, 07:39 AM
  #21  
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My second day riding a fully-loaded touring bike was the first day of my first tour. Seattle to Bar Harbor, ME via ACA's Northern Tier route (including the Waterton, AB, option) from the Mt. Vernon, WA area and then down the eastern seaboard to Philadelphia then on to Ocean City, NJ. Rode back home to Philly from Ocean City without my gear. Didn't have to adjust to "normal" life after that since I decided during the trip that I wasn't going to look for a job and would instead take another tour. Ended up in Andalucía for 7 weeks the following winter/spring. Came home and rested for three days then went back to Seattle and rode to Cortez, CO to stay with some friends and others who were interning at Mesa Verde N.P.
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Old 08-07-19, 08:06 AM
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Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
My second day riding a fully-loaded touring bike was the first day of my first tour. Seattle to Bar Harbor, ME via ACA's Northern Tier route...then on to Ocean City, NJ. Rode back home to Philly from Ocean City without my gear.

Didn't have to adjust to "normal" life after that since I decided during the trip that I wasn't going to look for a job and would instead take another tour. Ended up in Andalucía for 7 weeks the following winter/spring.

Came home and rested for three days then went back to Seattle and rode to Cortez, CO to stay with some friends and others who were interning at Mesa Verde N.P
I posted about our cross-country tour.
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
The trip was back in May to June of 1977 on our honeymoon as we were moving from Michigan to Boston and managed a two-month hiatus from work.

Our original plan was to go from LA to Boston with an eight week deadline, but around Colorado we decided we weren't traveling fast enough, so veered towards Washington to take the train up to Boston.

We navigated with an AAA USA Road map showing us the general direction, and then we used state Highway maps for day-to-day routes. It became a standing joke that at every rest stop, at every meal, and settling in at night we brought in a map to plot the next few miles.

The general route was starting in Laguna Beach …old Rte 66, to the Grand Canyon; then on to Four Corners, Mesa Verde, CO; crossed the Continental Divide at Wolf Creek pass; then through La Veta pass on into Kansas…
I remember well stopping for lunch in Cortez after the Four Corners, and the obligatory pictures standing in four states. At that time. as I recall, all-you-can-eat salad bars were a rarity, and we partook mightily of the one there.

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Old 08-07-19, 08:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
Yeah, my pads were pretty much shot when I got home from my Pacific Coast trip. I had one pair (for one wheel) spare pads with me on the trip but did not replace until I got home.
While those pads are worn out, you didn't have to take them off the bike to change the pads. The new pads just slip into the holder without removing them from the bike.

Just sayin'.
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Old 08-07-19, 12:11 PM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
While those pads are worn out, you didn't have to take them off the bike to change the pads. The new pads just slip into the holder without removing them from the bike.

Just sayin'.
That was my defective 2004 LHT that Surly refused to warranty, I had such a bad shimmy for the entire trip that I stripped all the parts off of the bike when I got home and put the frame in the metal recycling bin. Since the parts were coming off the bike, I disassembled most parts for a good cleaning.
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Old 08-07-19, 02:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
That was my defective 2004 LHT that Surly refused to warranty, I had such a bad shimmy for the entire trip that I stripped all the parts off of the bike when I got home and put the frame in the metal recycling bin. Since the parts were coming off the bike, I disassembled most parts for a good cleaning.
Seems extreme? Checked weight distro, tires and wheels?
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