Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

1987 Trek 400D Elance paint and cleanup advice

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

1987 Trek 400D Elance paint and cleanup advice

Old 02-12-20, 09:31 PM
  #26  
Kapurnicus
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 22

Bikes: '87 Trek 400D Elance

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by SurferRosa View Post
About the cost of a basic color at Seattle Powder Coat.

How much do decals go for? $40?
You seem very concerned about money.
Kapurnicus is offline  
Old 02-12-20, 09:35 PM
  #27  
Kapurnicus
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 22

Bikes: '87 Trek 400D Elance

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Oh, thatís 10! I think cleaning would go a long way.





I thought that was missing electroplating, but it came off with my fingernail, so just needs a polish.

Bare metal. Movers are very inconsiderate. A great deal of paint damage is from the moving truck.



Some overspray from last time.


Kapurnicus is offline  
Old 02-12-20, 09:37 PM
  #28  
Kapurnicus
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 22

Bikes: '87 Trek 400D Elance

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts

Little bit of rust.

A little more rust.



Definitely need a new saddle

Last bit of rust on the frame. Only 3 spots Iíve found.

Should this be basically touching the gears? Looks wrong.


I thought that screw was stainless, but it doesnít appear that way.
Kapurnicus is offline  
Old 02-12-20, 10:00 PM
  #29  
SurferRosa
Senior Member
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Pac NW
Posts: 2,324

Bikes: old school 531c & Campy

Mentioned: 41 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1008 Post(s)
Liked 679 Times in 410 Posts
Originally Posted by Kapurnicus View Post
You seem very concerned about money.
Yeah, most of us here are, because we can buy and store only so many exceptional bicycles.

I noticed in your area a Trek 760 with full Campagnolo for $350...
SurferRosa is offline  
Likes For SurferRosa:
Old 02-13-20, 06:08 PM
  #30  
The Golden Boy 
Extraordinary Magnitude
 
The Golden Boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Waukesha WI
Posts: 12,029

Bikes: 1978 Trek TX700; 1978/79 Trek 736; 1984 Specialized Stumpjumper Sport; 1984 Schwinn Voyageur SP; 1985 Trek 620; 1985 Trek 720; 1986 Trek 400 Elance; 1987 Schwinn High Sierra; 1990 Miyata 1000LT

Mentioned: 75 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1993 Post(s)
Liked 302 Times in 211 Posts
If you've been searching Bike Forums threads about Trek 400 Elance stuff- you've probably ran across my dozen or so threads about my 1986 Trek 400 Elance.

Here's my theory about this bike... This is a 400 level Trek- at the time I think it was the 2nd from the bottom of Trek's lineup. But at this time, it seems Reynolds tubing had lost cachet, so this bike which has a double butted Reynolds 531 main frame and I believe Tru-Temper CrMo forks and stays is somehow a 400 level frame. Prior to 1986 a bike with a 531 frame and CrMo fork and stays was considered a 600 level frame. Where I think Trek got down to that price point is the components. There's nothing bad on here- it's all good stuff and it all works well- but this bike is a wonderful bike with nice stuff on it.

One of the first bikes I ever fell in love with was the 86 Trek 400 Elance in blue with the silver head tube- it was such a beautiful, classy machine- it's still what defines a good looking bike to me. That beautiful, deep Imron metallic blue- you can see "into" it, the way it glistens in the morning sun... I actually searched for one for months using every CL scouring app I could use- and I found an overpriced one more than 100 miles away- after dithering on it for a little bit, found it was still available- and drove there, with a horrible cold in sub zero temperatures and paid full asking price.

Over the years I've upgraded most of all the parts on the bike- My first secret plan was to go to tricolor 600 on it, but eventually decided on a mix of 600, XC Pro, XC Comp, Superbe and others... it's all pretty much top shelf stuff and the bike is fantastic.

I'm a really bad person to ask how much to drop into a project like this. I'd guess this is a $200 bike- if that and I have somewhere around $1000 into it. And I think it's worth it.

As far as your bike... Make sure it fits you- if it doesn't fit, no matter what you do to it- it's going to suck.

If it fits, get it powder coated and clean up your parts. You can always upgrade parts at any time, or you can keep what you've got. Since you're missing a brake, I'd recommend getting some new Tektro dual pivot brakes- you'll need longer reach brakes so I think that's the R559. And personally, I think your saddle is shot- I think an old Avocet Touring II (not WII) would be slick on this bike.

And just for giggles- here's some old pix of mine!


1986 Trek 400 Elance by Dave The Golden Boy, on Flickr

1986 Trek 400 Elance by Dave The Golden Boy, on Flickr

1986 Trek 400 Elance by Dave The Golden Boy, on Flickr

1986 Trek 400 Elance by Dave The Golden Boy, on Flickr
__________________
*Recipient of the 2006 Time Magazine "Person Of The Year" Award*

Commence to jiggliní huh?!?!

"But hey, always love to hear from opinionated amateurs." -says some guy to Mr. Marshall.
The Golden Boy is offline  
Old 02-13-20, 06:23 PM
  #31  
Hudson308 
Mr. Anachronism
 
Hudson308's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: City of Lakes
Posts: 1,933

Bikes: fillet-brazed Chicago Schwinns, and some other stuff

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 478 Post(s)
Liked 156 Times in 107 Posts
Originally Posted by The Golden Boy View Post
Here's my theory about this bike... This is a 400 level Trek- at the time I think it was the 2nd from the bottom of Trek's lineup. But at this time, it seems Reynolds tubing had lost cachet, so this bike which has a double butted Reynolds 531 main frame and I believe Tru-Temper CrMo forks and stays is somehow a 400 level frame. Prior to 1986 a bike with a 531 frame and CrMo fork and stays was considered a 600 level frame. Where I think Trek got down to that price point is the components. There's nothing bad on here- it's all good stuff and it all works well- but this bike is a wonderful bike with nice stuff on it.

One of the first bikes I ever fell in love with was the 86 Trek 400 Elance in blue with the silver head tube- it was such a beautiful, classy machine- it's still what defines a good looking bike to me. That beautiful, deep Imron metallic blue- you can see "into" it, the way it glistens in the morning sun... I actually searched for one for months using every CL scouring app I could use- and I found an overpriced one more than 100 miles away- after dithering on it for a little bit, found it was still available- and drove there, with a horrible cold in sub zero temperatures and paid full asking price.

Make sure it fits you- if it doesn't fit, no matter what you do to it- it's going to suck.
If it fits, get it powder coated and clean up your parts. You can always upgrade parts at any time, or you can keep what you've got. Since you're missing a brake, I'd recommend getting some new Tektro dual pivot brakes- you'll need longer reach brakes so I think that's the R559. And personally, I think your saddle is shot- I think an old Avocet Touring II (not WII) would be slick on this bike.
Yeah, what he said.
__________________
"If we don't change direction soon, we'll end up where we're going." -Irwin Corey
Hudson308 is offline  
Old 02-13-20, 06:25 PM
  #32  
Hudson308 
Mr. Anachronism
 
Hudson308's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: City of Lakes
Posts: 1,933

Bikes: fillet-brazed Chicago Schwinns, and some other stuff

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 478 Post(s)
Liked 156 Times in 107 Posts
Originally Posted by Kapurnicus View Post
You seem very concerned about money.
I take it by that comment you're not; so strip that thing all the way down and get it done right. It's a sweet bike.
__________________
"If we don't change direction soon, we'll end up where we're going." -Irwin Corey
Hudson308 is offline  
Old 02-13-20, 09:51 PM
  #33  
SurferRosa
Senior Member
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Pac NW
Posts: 2,324

Bikes: old school 531c & Campy

Mentioned: 41 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1008 Post(s)
Liked 679 Times in 410 Posts
Originally Posted by The Golden Boy View Post
I'd recommend getting some new Tektro dual pivot brakes- you'll need longer reach brakes so I think that's the R559.
Those are way too long. Best to measure first.
SurferRosa is offline  
Old 02-13-20, 10:01 PM
  #34  
Kapurnicus
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 22

Bikes: '87 Trek 400D Elance

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by The Golden Boy View Post
If you've been searching Bike Forums threads about Trek 400 Elance stuff- you've probably ran across my dozen or so threads about my 1986 Trek 400 Elance.

Here's my theory about this bike... This is a 400 level Trek- at the time I think it was the 2nd from the bottom of Trek's lineup. But at this time, it seems Reynolds tubing had lost cachet, so this bike which has a double butted Reynolds 531 main frame and I believe Tru-Temper CrMo forks and stays is somehow a 400 level frame. Prior to 1986 a bike with a 531 frame and CrMo fork and stays was considered a 600 level frame. Where I think Trek got down to that price point is the components. There's nothing bad on here- it's all good stuff and it all works well- but this bike is a wonderful bike with nice stuff on it.

One of the first bikes I ever fell in love with was the 86 Trek 400 Elance in blue with the silver head tube- it was such a beautiful, classy machine- it's still what defines a good looking bike to me. That beautiful, deep Imron metallic blue- you can see "into" it, the way it glistens in the morning sun... I actually searched for one for months using every CL scouring app I could use- and I found an overpriced one more than 100 miles away- after dithering on it for a little bit, found it was still available- and drove there, with a horrible cold in sub zero temperatures and paid full asking price.

Over the years I've upgraded most of all the parts on the bike- My first secret plan was to go to tricolor 600 on it, but eventually decided on a mix of 600, XC Pro, XC Comp, Superbe and others... it's all pretty much top shelf stuff and the bike is fantastic.

I'm a really bad person to ask how much to drop into a project like this. I'd guess this is a $200 bike- if that and I have somewhere around $1000 into it. And I think it's worth it.

As far as your bike... Make sure it fits you- if it doesn't fit, no matter what you do to it- it's going to suck.

If it fits, get it powder coated and clean up your parts. You can always upgrade parts at any time, or you can keep what you've got. Since you're missing a brake, I'd recommend getting some new Tektro dual pivot brakes- you'll need longer reach brakes so I think that's the R559. And personally, I think your saddle is shot- I think an old Avocet Touring II (not WII) would be slick on this bike.
Wow. That is a beautiful bike. Thatís nearly what this one looked like long ago (head tube was blue too, instead of silver).

Iím not sure what size is the right size. Iíve ridden this one pretty far at a time without pain. Look like itís maybe a 54cm if Iím measuring right. I think the crank is 180-185mm. My inseam is 32.5Ē. I can stand over it, and my leg is nearly fully extended at the bottom of a push, but not quite. Iíve got the seat up quite a ways. Iím 5-9, but with spinal fusion, so I should be taller. Iíve got long arms and legs, but canít bend far (from the rods), so a smaller bike might be best so I can get to the handlebars. Iíve never felt cramped on this one, but the calculators online say I should be on a 56 with 170mm crank (at least one of them. Others needed more measurements). Itís my understanding the calculators suck. Either way, Iím rebuilding this one, if itís not comfortable long term, Iíll do something else next.

I have both brakes on the bike. Might have just looked weird in a picture. Everything works.

Originally Posted by Hudson308 View Post
I take it by that comment you're not; so strip that thing all the way down and get it done right. It's a sweet bike.
There was just a lot of quoting proving I can get a better bike for less. Thatís true, but I like this one and want the experience of rebuilding it. Thatís worth more than a couple hundred to me. I figured I can make it powder coated and have some fun putting it back together for less than $400-500 using most of the hardware thatís here already. Maybe another $100 in tools. Iím okay with that. Iíve spent a lot more for less entertainment and this is a skill Iíve wanted to have for a while.


STEP 1: pedal rebuild. Both bearings arenít great.

Kapurnicus is offline  
Old 02-13-20, 11:03 PM
  #35  
markjenn
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 1,148
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 148 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 7 Posts
Here's my two 400's which might encourage you to keep at it. But if you're learning bike mechanics from square zero, I'd have reasonable expectations and work incrementally rather than attempting to do a complete restore from scratch. It's easy to go crazy and end up with boxes of parts that never become a bicycle again. Don't worry much about cosmetics initially other than cleaning..... just get the bike mechanically sound. Work in stages - get one system (wheels, gears, cables, etc.) cleaned and working properly, then move on from there. Good luck.


markjenn is offline  
Old 02-13-20, 11:43 PM
  #36  
Kapurnicus
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 22

Bikes: '87 Trek 400D Elance

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
ďGravelyĒ was an understatement. Hasnít been grease in here in a while. 13 balls per side. A dust cap that didnít want to come off. Quite a bit of wire brushing ahead. Not sure the outside (cone side) is salvageable. But once I get some rust off Iíll be able to see what the races look like. Any cleaning suggestions?

the inside doesnít look half bad. Still smooth and bare metal.



Dust cap did NOT want to pry off.

Metal flakes were falling out already.

13 each side

Cone. Might clean up. Suggestions?



Kapurnicus is offline  
Old 02-14-20, 12:08 AM
  #37  
Kapurnicus
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 22

Bikes: '87 Trek 400D Elance

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
One round of wire brush (manual, not dremel) and some dish detergent gave me hope. Races are smooth enough. A lot of the corrosion was surface level. Iíd like to get them cleaner, but I think theyíll work.

and suggestions on cleaning, where to get ball bearings (1/8Ē??) or what grease to use are all helpful.







Kapurnicus is offline  
Old 02-14-20, 07:29 AM
  #38  
Hudson308 
Mr. Anachronism
 
Hudson308's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: City of Lakes
Posts: 1,933

Bikes: fillet-brazed Chicago Schwinns, and some other stuff

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 478 Post(s)
Liked 156 Times in 107 Posts
I agree that resale value isn't the all-exclusive factor when deciding whether to restore/refurbish. I enjoy doing it just to bring worn-out machines back from the "discard" pile.
The pedals are a great place to start. You'll get many different opinions on what to use for cleaning & lube. My favorite cleaning solvent is mineral spirits, because it does the job without noxious fumes or aggressive chemicals. That and a brass brush selection (for cleaning bare steel) from Harbor Freight go a long way. I also like to use Finish Line Ceramic grease on the bearings. It seems to seep out alot less when it gets warm/hot. Grade 25 lot-matched bearing balls are available from eBay or Amazon.
__________________
"If we don't change direction soon, we'll end up where we're going." -Irwin Corey
Hudson308 is offline  
Old 02-14-20, 07:36 AM
  #39  
The Golden Boy 
Extraordinary Magnitude
 
The Golden Boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Waukesha WI
Posts: 12,029

Bikes: 1978 Trek TX700; 1978/79 Trek 736; 1984 Specialized Stumpjumper Sport; 1984 Schwinn Voyageur SP; 1985 Trek 620; 1985 Trek 720; 1986 Trek 400 Elance; 1987 Schwinn High Sierra; 1990 Miyata 1000LT

Mentioned: 75 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1993 Post(s)
Liked 302 Times in 211 Posts
Originally Posted by SurferRosa View Post
Those are way too long. Best to measure first.
6403 brakes are too short for 700c wheels- those go out to 49. Whatís the next size up polished Tektro DP brake?

The point is moot- as I misread the OP thinking he didnít have the rear brake- itís just not original.
__________________
*Recipient of the 2006 Time Magazine "Person Of The Year" Award*

Commence to jiggliní huh?!?!

"But hey, always love to hear from opinionated amateurs." -says some guy to Mr. Marshall.
The Golden Boy is offline  
Old 02-14-20, 07:39 AM
  #40  
The Golden Boy 
Extraordinary Magnitude
 
The Golden Boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Waukesha WI
Posts: 12,029

Bikes: 1978 Trek TX700; 1978/79 Trek 736; 1984 Specialized Stumpjumper Sport; 1984 Schwinn Voyageur SP; 1985 Trek 620; 1985 Trek 720; 1986 Trek 400 Elance; 1987 Schwinn High Sierra; 1990 Miyata 1000LT

Mentioned: 75 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1993 Post(s)
Liked 302 Times in 211 Posts
Originally Posted by markjenn View Post
Here's my two 400's which might encourage you to keep at it.

I was going to mention your green one in my post!!
__________________
*Recipient of the 2006 Time Magazine "Person Of The Year" Award*

Commence to jiggliní huh?!?!

"But hey, always love to hear from opinionated amateurs." -says some guy to Mr. Marshall.
The Golden Boy is offline  
Old 02-14-20, 12:37 PM
  #41  
SurferRosa
Senior Member
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Pac NW
Posts: 2,324

Bikes: old school 531c & Campy

Mentioned: 41 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1008 Post(s)
Liked 679 Times in 410 Posts
Originally Posted by The Golden Boy View Post
Whatís the next size up polished Tektro DP brake?
R539.

But they might have other models as well.
SurferRosa is offline  
Old 02-14-20, 01:05 PM
  #42  
dedhed
SE Wis
 
dedhed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 6,392

Bikes: '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1162 Post(s)
Liked 572 Times in 388 Posts
Originally Posted by Kapurnicus View Post
One round of wire brush (manual, not dremel) and some dish detergent gave me hope. Races are smooth enough. A lot of the corrosion was surface level. I’d like to get them cleaner, but I think they’ll work.

and suggestions on cleaning, where to get ball bearings (1/8”??) or what grease to use are all helpful.
grade 25 chrome steel balls from Amazon or Ebay or if you want to try locally a bearing house like Motion Industries.
Marine boat trailer wheel bearing grease from the auto parts store
dedhed is offline  
Old 02-14-20, 01:10 PM
  #43  
dedhed
SE Wis
 
dedhed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 6,392

Bikes: '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1162 Post(s)
Liked 572 Times in 388 Posts
Originally Posted by The Golden Boy View Post
Here's my theory about this bike... This is a 400 level Trek- at the time I think it was the 2nd from the bottom of Trek's lineup. But at this time, it seems Reynolds tubing had lost cachet, so this bike which has a double butted Reynolds 531 main frame and I believe Tru-Temper CrMo forks and stays is somehow a 400 level frame. Prior to 1986 a bike with a 531 frame and CrMo fork and stays was considered a 600 level frame. Where I think Trek got down to that price point is the components. There's nothing bad on here- it's all good stuff and it all works well- but this bike is a wonderful bike with nice stuff on it.
I'm a really bad person to ask how much to drop into a project like this. I'd guess this is a $200 bike- if that and I have somewhere around $1000 into it. And I think it's worth it.

I didn't have any issue dropping over $1K on my 1987 400 or 1991 updating them with 10 speed Ultegra triples and new wheels

1987

1991
dedhed is offline  
Likes For dedhed:
Old 02-14-20, 02:36 PM
  #44  
Chr0m0ly 
Senior Member
 
Chr0m0ly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Hamilton Heights, Manhattan, New York, NY
Posts: 1,538

Bikes: '84 Miyata 610 '85 Miyata 710, Ď86 Miyata 710, Ď91 Cannondale ST600, Ď84 Trek 610, 520, 620, Ď91 Miyata 1000LT, a few frames, some odds and ends....

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 602 Post(s)
Liked 214 Times in 137 Posts
Originally Posted by The Golden Boy View Post
I was going to mention your green one in my post!!
Halloo Golden Boy!
I posted some questions about Treks Ď86 Triathlon series but itís not seeing a lot of attention, so Iím (sorry!) going to do a mini-derail here.

I had an Ď84 610 that I loved for its ďmedium-nessĒ livelier than a touring bike, more forgiving than the X60 series. Does your 400 fall into that same lovely middle category?

Iím pretty sure the Ď86 Triathlon 500 and 700 were the same bike as the Elance series but with better tubing, is that correct?

Iíd love to find another ďmiddle-ishĒ bike I could fit 700-32s on, (sans fender) with a saddle role and a bar bag. Something that would carry a jacket and a lunch but was just a little more aggressive than a full boat tourer.
Chr0m0ly is offline  
Old 02-14-20, 03:42 PM
  #45  
Kapurnicus
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 22

Bikes: '87 Trek 400D Elance

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Chr0m0ly View Post
Halloo Golden Boy!
I posted some questions about Treks ‘86 Triathlon series but it’s not seeing a lot of attention, so I’m (sorry!) going to do a mini-derail here.

I had an ‘84 610 that I loved for its “medium-ness” livelier than a touring bike, more forgiving than the X60 series. Does your 400 fall into that same lovely middle category?

I’m pretty sure the ‘86 Triathlon 500 and 700 were the same bike as the Elance series but with better tubing, is that correct?

I’d love to find another “middle-ish” bike I could fit 700-32s on, (sans fender) with a saddle role and a bar bag. Something that would carry a jacket and a lunch but was just a little more aggressive than a full boat tourer.
Get your own thread! Having no bike experience other than this, The strong frame has been good with a lot of weight (had pannier bags at one point) and still felt fast. I've never been on a race bike, and only cheap Walmart bikes as far as commuters and mountain bikes. I always liked the weight of this one, felt strong but still light. One thing I did change for a long time was the tires, I've got a set of ribbed 32s that "feel" better than the 23s, (and didn't pop as often). Absorbed more of the road, but were MUCH slower according to my Hall effect speed gauge. (Obviously that absorbing and road friction steal some power). I'm sure you were asking Golden Boy, but this is my thread, so I felt okay answering haha.

Anyone know for sure this ball bearing size? It's measuring with calipers about 1/8, but they aren't exactly round and good anymore. These are SR SP-250 pedals. I'll look, but I think my grease gun has some bearing grease in it from the last trailer I built that will probably work fine. Looks like I'm gettin bearing balls off amazon, no where locally seems to have this size in stock (even Fastenal has to ship them).

Cleaning suggestion other than mineral oil? I just used some dawn as a degreaser. I'm going to lightly hit them with the polisher on the Dremel I think. I'll avoid the actual bearing contact area as much as possible. It's pitted, but doesn't stick up anyway, so it should still run smooth with some grease. I'm feeling optimistic.
Kapurnicus is offline  
Old 02-17-20, 01:32 PM
  #46  
Jeff Neese
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 274
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 90 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
If your goal is to do a full-on restoration, and this bike is definitely worth it, I'd forgot about painting it yourself. You're just not going to do it justice, unless you happen to have a sandblaster and professional paint booth at home.

Take it to a LBS, have them strip the frame and put all the parts in a box. Take it somewhere that will sandblast it down to bare metal, and then either paint or powder coat it. I like powder coating myself, but you do lose a slight bit of detail around the lugs.

Then you reassemble it, using whatever combination of old parts and new upgrades you want. That's the fun part. You end up with a brand new bike that you can keep forever.
Jeff Neese is offline  
Old 02-17-20, 05:47 PM
  #47  
Kapurnicus
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 22

Bikes: '87 Trek 400D Elance

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Jeff Neese View Post
If your goal is to do a full-on restoration, and this bike is definitely worth it, I'd forgot about painting it yourself. You're just not going to do it justice, unless you happen to have a sandblaster and professional paint booth at home.

Take it to a LBS, have them strip the frame and put all the parts in a box. Take it somewhere that will sandblast it down to bare metal, and then either paint or powder coat it. I like powder coating myself, but you do lose a slight bit of detail around the lugs.

Then you reassemble it, using whatever combination of old parts and new upgrades you want. That's the fun part. You end up with a brand new bike that you can keep forever.
Definitely decided on the powder coating. So much more durable than paint.

Got the pedals done. The gravely one actually spins now! Used waterproof marine bearing grease, says its good for trailer and marine bearings, so I figured it fine for a pedal. It's blue-ish, but seems to be about the consistency I expected. Worked great. Was easier than I thought. Had to do a lot of work on the first one, but the second one was still in pretty good shape, so I just cleaned everything and put in new grease and balls.

Next I think I'm going to go for the wheels. Have to figure out how the hubs work and how to get the freewheel off (first special tool purchase I guess).
Kapurnicus is offline  
Old 02-18-20, 08:00 AM
  #48  
PugRider
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Worcester, Massachusetts
Posts: 192

Bikes: Fuji Sportif 1.7C, Peugeot Paris Express, Shogun Metro AT, Jamis Durango SX, Miyata Alumicross, Fuji Special Road Racer, Mongoose ATB, Fuji SST 1.0 Team

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 44 Post(s)
Liked 26 Times in 17 Posts
Once you get the freewheel off (Park tools FR-1, probably), it's not too far off from what you did with the pedals. You'll need cone wrenches (probably 13mm for the front, 15mm for the rear, but check). Same idea. Just leave one set of cups and cones tight on the spindle if possible to keep everything aligned.

Last edited by PugRider; 02-18-20 at 08:01 AM. Reason: cone wrench suggestion
PugRider is offline  
Old 02-18-20, 10:50 PM
  #49  
Kapurnicus
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 22

Bikes: '87 Trek 400D Elance

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by PugRider View Post
Once you get the freewheel off (Park tools FR-1, probably), it's not too far off from what you did with the pedals. You'll need cone wrenches (probably 13mm for the front, 15mm for the rear, but check). Same idea. Just leave one set of cups and cones tight on the spindle if possible to keep everything aligned.
thanks for the advice. it ended up being a cassette (based on the park tools site, I didnít know the difference). So I think it uses the FR-5.2 from Park tools based on their images.

I didnít see much difference between a cone wrench and a normal crecent. Is there a reason I canít use normal wrenches? I guess Iíll find out when the cassette removal tool comes. Iíll take a look at the front too. Iíll keep posting pics. This will hopefully be interesting for someone later to watch the whole process.





Shimano 6 speed cassette
Kapurnicus is offline  
Old 02-19-20, 07:45 AM
  #50  
Hudson308 
Mr. Anachronism
 
Hudson308's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: City of Lakes
Posts: 1,933

Bikes: fillet-brazed Chicago Schwinns, and some other stuff

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 478 Post(s)
Liked 156 Times in 107 Posts
Originally Posted by Kapurnicus View Post
I didnít see much difference between a cone wrench and a normal crecent. Is there a reason I canít use normal wrenches? I guess Iíll find out when the cassette removal tool comes. Iíll take a look at the front too. Iíll keep posting pics. This will hopefully be interesting for someone later to watch the whole process.
The reason cone wrenches work where normal open-end (or Crescent) wrenches won't is due to the wrench thickness. Normal open-end wrenches are too thick to get in to grab the cone flats with the nut in place. This becomes critical when you're trying to hold the cone while adjusting the nut.
One more tip is to use a stick magnet (like the telescoping ones) to grab the bearing balls out of the hub, once the cone is removed. Please keep posting pics. We love watching old, worn-out bikes slowly come back to life!
BTW mineral spirits is very different than mineral oil.
__________________
"If we don't change direction soon, we'll end up where we're going." -Irwin Corey
Hudson308 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.