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Is There A Reason That Mountain & Bike Handlebar Diameters Are Different?

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Is There A Reason That Mountain & Bike Handlebar Diameters Are Different?

Old 07-06-20, 09:48 PM
  #26  
cango
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Originally Posted by Paul Barnard View Post
You know what else annoys me? They made it so that I can't move my mountain bike wheels and tires over to my road bike. There is no reason extra room can't be built into road frames.
Not sure if you are making fun of me or not but thats ok . My post seems to have drawn the ire of many. Oh well as they say.

I understand the lack of compatibility between brands, brake pull, etc... but that being said I have seen brifters on flat bar bikes. I have also seen mountain style brake levers on the flat portion of road bars in addition to the brifters. How they got this to work, I don't know.

I saw a video recently on Youtube where a bike mechanic explained that very thing - people want to turn their road bikes into gravel bikes but they can't because there is not enough room to fit the tires. There is just no room for anything but the skinny road racing tires.

I thought thats kind of dumb as well, it limits the versatility of the bike. I have an old Trek 750 Multitrack and it as 32mm tires but can take all the way up to something like 45 or something crazy. It has tons of room.
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Old 07-06-20, 10:04 PM
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Originally Posted by HD3andMe View Post
No, you're wrong again. I even provided a link in my previous reply. Shimano road and MTB is compatible - Di2. Read, or watch the linked video here once again:

https://www.cxmagazine.com/mechanica...train-shifters



Thank you for admitting that your claim is only based on your limited experience working at a co-op. The reality is that the market is much different than you describe it.



Yeah, you're missing the point. You don't need mountain shifters to actuate mountain derailleurs with Di2 or AXS. They can work with road shifters...
ok, youíve made your point and can stop now. So electronic shifting works across disciplines. Thank you. Thatís still a tiny fraction of the market (electronic shifting) and youíre cramming it into an even tinier segment (people who want to cross-over flat and drop bars) and is utterly irrelevant to the point of this thread anyway.
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Old 07-06-20, 10:14 PM
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The problem is if you designed one bike to do everything it would be a pretty bad bike.

Just throwing wide tires on any road bike doesn’t make it a good gravel bike.

John
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Old 07-06-20, 10:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Leinster View Post
ok, youíve made your point and can stop now. So electronic shifting works across disciplines. Thank you. Thatís still a tiny fraction of the market (electronic shifting) and youíre cramming it into an even tinier segment (people who want to cross-over flat and drop bars) and is utterly irrelevant to the point of this thread anyway.
Nah, I'll continue to post as I please, despite your whine.

You're free to scroll on by if my posts continue to cause you distress. Best of luck.
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Old 07-06-20, 10:34 PM
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From what I understand is that 31.8 became standard with the need for stronger bars in mountain biking. Road bars followed to take advantage of the carbon bars coming out?
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Old 07-07-20, 04:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Gresp15C View Post
... unless you've got an old Schwinn cruiser.
I was joking. There are at least 10 non-interchangeable 26" tire sizes; e.g., 26 x 1.75 and 26 x 1 3/4 are not interchangeable.
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Old 07-07-20, 07:15 AM
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Originally Posted by cango View Post
I understand the lack of compatibility between brands, brake pull, etc... but that being said I have seen brifters on flat bar bikes. I have also seen mountain style brake levers on the flat portion of road bars in addition to the brifters. How they got this to work, I don't know.
Interrupter brakes are different from mountain bike levers. They may look like mountain bike levers but they function differently. The pull ratio is for a short pull brake rather than a long pull brake that is most common on mountain bikes. They split the brake cable housing and work by pushing on the housing during braking. Mountain and road levers pull on the inner cable while keeping the housing still.

I saw a video recently on Youtube where a bike mechanic explained that very thing - people want to turn their road bikes into gravel bikes but they can't because there is not enough room to fit the tires. There is just no room for anything but the skinny road racing tires.
Different issue.

I thought thats kind of dumb as well, it limits the versatility of the bike. I have an old Trek 750 Multitrack and it as 32mm tires but can take all the way up to something like 45 or something crazy. It has tons of room.
Versatility is nice but specialization has itís place. A road bike is generally built for going fast on smooth surfaces. A mountain bike is built for going fast on very unsmooth surfaces. Put one on the otherís surface and it doesnít do what it is designed to do very well...particularly the fast part but neither is all that comfortable to ride on the otherís surface. Trying to make a bike that is versatile enough to ride on pavement and on rocks ends up with a bike that is frustrating to ride on both. It wonít go that fast on the road and it doesnít handle technical terrain all that well. Its versatility is not limited but its function is.
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Old 07-07-20, 07:17 AM
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Originally Posted by HD3andMe View Post
No, you're wrong again. I even provided a link in my previous reply. Shimano road and MTB is compatible - Di2. Read, or watch the linked video here once again:

https://www.cxmagazine.com/mechanica...train-shifters



Thank you for admitting that your claim is only based on your limited experience working at a co-op. The reality is that the market is much different than you describe it.



Yeah, you're missing the point. You don't need mountain shifters to actuate mountain derailleurs with Di2 or AXS. They can work with road shifters...
Thank you, Captain Esoteric. Shall we talk of angels and pinheads now?
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Old 07-07-20, 07:21 AM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by Paul Barnard View Post
You know what else annoys me? They made it so that I can't move my mountain bike wheels and tires over to my road bike. There is no reason extra room can't be built into road frames.
I know youíre being tongue-in-cheek, but you can do this now


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Old 07-07-20, 07:21 AM
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Old 07-07-20, 07:52 AM
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Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
crud, did I miss something?
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Old 07-07-20, 08:28 AM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by curbtender View Post
From what I understand is that 31.8 became standard with the need for stronger bars in mountain biking. Road bars followed to take advantage of the carbon bars coming out?
This seems to be a pattern. Disc brakes, tubeless, wide rims, wide tires, 650b, 1x, 31.8 bars and thru-axles have all been lifted from MTB.

I can almost guarantee you that within 5 years, we will see 1.5Ē steerers, 110/148 boost spacing and 35mm handlebars on gravel/road bikes.

I still donít understand why anyone would expect road bars and mtb bars to have the same diameter, for all the reasons stated by others. What is the use case?
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Old 07-07-20, 08:30 AM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Thank you, Captain Esoteric. Shall we talk of angels and pinheads now?
Sorry, not interested.

However, we can keep discussing how modern mountain and road shift and brake levers are compatible with the drivetrain and brake components, if you're still interested in learning more about that.

The same goes for SRAM vs. Shimano market share and how one guy's opinion based on his alleged co-op experience is at odds with the true numbers.

Just let me know.
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Old 07-07-20, 08:33 AM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by HD3andMe View Post

However, we can keep discussing how modern mountain and road shift and brake levers are compatible with the drivetrain and brake components, if you're still interested in learning more about that.
I donít see how this is relevant to the thread. The thread is discussing using road shifters/brake levers on flat bars and trigger shifters on drop bars, which I have never seen done before.
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Old 07-07-20, 09:03 AM
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Originally Posted by smashndash View Post
I donít see how this is relevant to the thread. The thread is discussing using road shifters/brake levers on flat bars and trigger shifters on drop bars, which I have never seen done before.
I have seen it but it doesnít work all that well. The flat part of a road bar is generally too small for the length of even a small set of mountain bike brake levers to fit...the barrel adjusters run into each other, much less put a set of shifters in there too. There are several other issues as well. You canít brake from the drops nor is there anything to hold onto on the hoods so you are even more limited in hand positions than with flat bars. The brake levers are also very, very close together which would cause the rider to ride with squeezed in arms and, likely, hunched back. Not terribly comfortable.

Road brake levers work a bit better on flat bars but the brake routing is funky. If you are trying to use aero levers, the brake cable makes a very tight turn at the bar (or just flaps around to catch on everything. You could use a integrated shifter but, again, the cable routing is funky.

Generally, shift and brake components work best on the bars they were designed for.
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Old 07-07-20, 09:26 AM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by HD3andMe View Post
Sorry, not interested.

However, we can keep discussing how modern mountain and road shift and brake levers are compatible with the drivetrain and brake components, if you're still interested in learning more about that.

The same goes for SRAM vs. Shimano market share and how one guy's opinion based on his alleged co-op experience is at odds with the true numbers.

Just let me know.
People are constantly questioning my co-op experience. How many bikes have you worked on in the last 10 years? I do one 7 hour shift per week and have for nearly every week since about 2010. My shift is the Saturday shift which is the busiest and for the entire 7 hours, all 6 stands in the work shop are full. We limit the amount of time that people can work on their bikes to 90 minutes. That’s about 30 bikes per day or, roughly, 1500 bikes per year. I have worked on 15,000 bikes in 10 years. You won’t find paid shop mechanic who has worked on that many bikes in a similar period. They aren’t working on 6 bikes at once.

Now granted, most of the bikes we see are older bikes but not all of them are. We see a fair number of newer bikes as well. The vast majority of new bikes are Shimano equipped. Maybe that will change as SRAM grows but that’s the future. I’m talking about past equipment.

I also don’t live in a vacuum. I know the market and check out new bikes on a very regular basis. SRAM is making inroads into Shimano’s market share (50% of the total market) on the high end but Shimano still has most of the market. SRAM has about 35% of the market. I don’t say this with glee. I have bikes with both Shimano and SRAM. I have bikes that are completely Shimano free (it wasn’t that easy to do when I did it). I’d like to see SRAM gain more of the market just to have some innovation. Shimano is kind of stodgy and don’t generally make components cross compatible.
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Old 07-07-20, 10:07 AM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
People are constantly questioning my co-op experience. How many bikes have you worked on in the last 10 years? I do one 7 hour shift per week and have for nearly every week since about 2010. My shift is the Saturday shift which is the busiest and for the entire 7 hours, all 6 stands in the work shop are full. We limit the amount of time that people can work on their bikes to 90 minutes. Thatís about 30 bikes per day or, roughly, 1500 bikes per year. I have worked on 15,000 bikes in 10 years. You wonít find paid shop mechanic who has worked on that many bikes in a similar period. They arenít working on 6 bikes at once.

Now granted, most of the bikes we see are older bikes but not all of them are. We see a fair number of newer bikes as well. The vast majority of new bikes are Shimano equipped. Maybe that will change as SRAM grows but thatís the future. Iím talking about past equipment.

I also donít live in a vacuum. I know the market and check out new bikes on a very regular basis. SRAM is making inroads into Shimanoís market share (50% of the total market) on the high end but Shimano still has most of the market. SRAM has about 35% of the market. I donít say this with glee. I have bikes with both Shimano and SRAM. I have bikes that are completely Shimano free (it wasnít that easy to do when I did it). Iíd like to see SRAM gain more of the market just to have some innovation. Shimano is kind of stodgy and donít generally make components cross compatible.
Thanks for correcting your erroneous "SRAM's market share is "fairly small." bit.

To learn more about how SRAM has taken away significant market share from Shimano, you should study how SRAM was first to market with 1x in the MTB segment and has been eating Shimano's lunch on OEM specs (which helps drive significant repeat business, further strengthening market share).
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Old 07-07-20, 10:10 AM
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Originally Posted by smashndash View Post
I donít see how this is relevant to the thread. The thread is discussing using road shifters/brake levers on flat bars and trigger shifters on drop bars, which I have never seen done before.
Well, if you're upset about folks discussing how modern mountain and road shift and brake levers are compatible with the drivetrain and brake components, you should take that up with the cyccommute fellow, since he's the one that brought it up.
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Old 07-07-20, 10:38 AM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by HD3andMe View Post
Thanks for correcting your erroneous "SRAM's market share is "fairly small." bit.
But the part of the market where SRAM road and MTB groups are compatible (ie electronic shifting) is tiny, and you haven't acknowledged that, at all.
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Old 07-07-20, 10:39 AM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by cango View Post
Not sure if you are making fun of me or not but thats ok . My post seems to have drawn the ire of many. Oh well as they say.

I understand the lack of compatibility between brands, brake pull, etc... but that being said I have seen brifters on flat bar bikes. I have also seen mountain style brake levers on the flat portion of road bars in addition to the brifters. How they got this to work, I don't know.

I saw a video recently on Youtube where a bike mechanic explained that very thing - people want to turn their road bikes into gravel bikes but they can't because there is not enough room to fit the tires. There is just no room for anything but the skinny road racing tires.

I thought thats kind of dumb as well, it limits the versatility of the bike. I have an old Trek 750 Multitrack and it as 32mm tires but can take all the way up to something like 45 or something crazy. It has tons of room.
If a road bike won't take a wide tire then it's probably a dedicated road bike not designed for much more than fast riding on paved surfaces. It's like complaining because you can't put SUV tires on your Ferarri or Lambourghini.

Cheers
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Old 07-07-20, 10:47 AM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by HD3andMe View Post
No, you're wrong again. I even provided a link in my previous reply. Shimano road and MTB is compatible - Di2. Read, or watch the linked video here once again:

https://www.cxmagazine.com/mechanica...train-shifters



Thank you for admitting that your claim is only based on your limited experience working at a co-op. The reality is that the market is much different than you describe it.



Yeah, you're missing the point. You don't need mountain shifters to actuate mountain derailleurs with Di2 or AXS. They can work with road shifters...
Seems like they're only compatible with a lot of tinkering and the use of a special battery and a software change.

Cheers
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Old 07-07-20, 12:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Miele Man View Post
Seems like they're only compatible with a lot of tinkering and the use of a special battery and a software change.

Cheers
That is false. Please go back and read the AXS link to learn why.

Cheers!
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Old 07-07-20, 12:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Leinster View Post
But the part of the market where SRAM road and MTB groups are compatible (ie electronic shifting) is tiny, and you haven't acknowledged that, at all.
I have been discussing the other guy's absolute claim that they aren't compatible. Then discussing SRAM's overall market share. Please keep up.

(you're still here reading? What happened to your " utterly irrelevant to the point of this thread anyway" whine?)
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Old 07-07-20, 01:49 PM
  #49  
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
What parts do you think can be moved between road and mountain bikes?
Revo-Shift grip shifters, of course...
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Old 07-07-20, 02:38 PM
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Originally Posted by HD3andMe View Post
That is false. Please go back and read the AXS link to learn why.

Cheers!
I did read it and that's where I saw what all was needed to make them compatible includuing the battery and the software upgrade.

Cheers
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