Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Recreational & Family
Reload this Page >

1st MTB for 9-10 yr old daughter, 26" or 27.5"?

Notices
Recreational & Family Ride just to ride? Have a family and want to get them into cycling? Drop in here to discuss recreational and family cycling issues.

1st MTB for 9-10 yr old daughter, 26" or 27.5"?

Old 11-08-15, 05:30 AM
  #1  
Bmil128
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Katy, TX
Posts: 6

Bikes: Trek X Caliber 8 (2014); Raleigh M50 (2004)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
1st MTB for 9-10 yr old daughter, 26" or 27.5"?

Looking at moving my soon to be 10 yr old daughter up from her 20" big box store bike, she's almost 4'10" so I think a 24" might not last long enough for my liking. I'm looking at the Giant/Liv Enchant 1 which is 26" but includes Altus/Acera drivetrain; for a bit less I could get a Trek 820 26" with a Tourney drivetrain, or from a different LBS I could get a Specialized Myka with a Tourney drivetrain but is a 27.5". Should I go for something a bit bigger like the Specialized that would last her longer or get the Liv which has slightly better components, we live in Texas suburbia so any off road punishment will not be too severe.
Bmil128 is offline  
Old 11-09-15, 09:35 AM
  #2  
atbman
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Leeds UK
Posts: 2,083
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 36 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
Variety of considerations: budget, child-suitable component size (esp. brake lever reach), resale value as well as the ones you've already looked at. Plus consideration of skill levels needed for your local terrain and whether or not she's likely to want to learn how to bunny hop, jump and do other things inclined to terrify a loving parent.

As a UK resident and coach, I'm not familiar with the models you've listed, but as far as size is concerned, you could do worse than look at the Islabikes website sizing chart Size guide - Islabikes to give you some idea of what might be suitable in general. You could then crosscheck the dimensions of the Beinn 26 (large) which seems to be in her ballpark against those you've looked at.

I'm not a great fan of suspension forks for kids new to mtb'ing - cheap ones are more like pogo sticks and can weigh a ton (ish). My resoning is that such forks enable a kid to go faster than their skill level allows. They will always crash, but the limitation imposed by rigid forks keeps the speed lower so the ground/child interface crunch is less damaging (for bike as well).

It's not my plastic that's about to be hammered and Islabikes are on the pricy side, but their resale value is phenominally high (80%+ after 12/24 months is not uncommon in the UK), so the cost per week ridden is pretty good. And no, I'm not on commission. And kid satisfaction rates a pretty high as well.

As far as getting a slighlty big one is concerned (apologies if I'm teach granny to suck eggs), it makes bike control more difficult, so adjustability in reach and saddle height is paramount. Whatever you chose, good luck and happy family riding.
atbman is offline  
Old 11-09-15, 09:55 AM
  #3  
atbman
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Leeds UK
Posts: 2,083
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 36 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
Again, in the teachiing granny to suck eggs area, have you tried https://bikehouston.org/ for contacts/advice? There also seems to be quite a lot of internet cycling activity around Katy
atbman is offline  
Old 11-09-15, 09:57 AM
  #4  
TheLibrarian
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Hudson Valley, New York
Posts: 480

Bikes: 2014 Giant Roam

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 84 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
20'' bmx is what children should learn to mtn bike on.
TheLibrarian is offline  
Old 11-11-15, 01:10 PM
  #5  
mstateglfr 
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 10,275

Bikes: '18 class built steel roadbike, '19 Fairlight Secan, '87 Schwinn Prelude, Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara Trionfo, '18 Diamondback Syncr

Mentioned: 92 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4004 Post(s)
Liked 966 Times in 622 Posts
You mention limited off road use, so perhaps staying away from suspension forks would be a good approach? You could narrow the choices from there.
A used 26" rigid mtb in XXS or 13" or whatever would be great. Toss some slicks on it instead of the heavy and slow knobby tires and she could have a great bike that is more responsive and lighter than a new heavy cheap forked suspension mtb.
Used rigid mtbs, depending on what you get, are typically great deals- cheaper price and WAY better components than something entry level and new. Of course, it means finding something in her size that's used.

Buy rigid frame
Install slicks
Kid has fun
Whatever you decide(new or used, rigid or travel fork)- don't buy a bike for her to grow into in a couple years. That means 2 years of a bike that's too big. Yes, kids outgrow bikes and its a money suck- but there is craigslist to buy used bikes that others have outgrown and sell your old ones.
mstateglfr is offline  
Old 11-11-15, 01:29 PM
  #6  
MRT2
Senior Member
 
MRT2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 6,110

Bikes: 2012 Salsa Casseroll, 2009 Kona Blast

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 911 Post(s)
Liked 99 Times in 72 Posts
When my son was that age, we went with a used Trek 800 with 26" wheels. It was a hardtail, so no suspension at all. We mounted 1.6" slicks on it for easier rolling. It was a great first adult bike that he pretty much rode everywhere including some 30 to 35 mile rides, where he had no trouble keeping up with adults and older kids riding 700c wheels.
MRT2 is offline  
Old 11-19-15, 10:12 AM
  #7  
Bmil128
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Katy, TX
Posts: 6

Bikes: Trek X Caliber 8 (2014); Raleigh M50 (2004)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I ended up getting her the 26" Liv in a 13" frame, she fits on it wel and loves it
Bmil128 is offline  
Old 11-19-15, 10:28 AM
  #8  
Darth Lefty 
Disco Infiltrator
 
Darth Lefty's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Folsom CA
Posts: 10,770

Bikes: Schwinn Paramount, Salsa Timberjack, Diamondback Expert TG, Burley Samba

Mentioned: 63 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1915 Post(s)
Liked 485 Times in 335 Posts
Cannondale and Fuji have nice looking 24in hybrids this year. Seems like with the niche identified the bigger companies want to compete in it.

https://www.fujibikes.com/bike/details/absolute-24-

https://www.cannondale.com/en/USA/Bik...2-549fce5c9aee
__________________
Genesis 49:16-17

Last edited by Darth Lefty; 11-19-15 at 11:06 AM.
Darth Lefty is offline  
Old 11-19-15, 03:38 PM
  #9  
mstateglfr 
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 10,275

Bikes: '18 class built steel roadbike, '19 Fairlight Secan, '87 Schwinn Prelude, Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara Trionfo, '18 Diamondback Syncr

Mentioned: 92 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4004 Post(s)
Liked 966 Times in 622 Posts
What is the deal with Cdale using a left single side fork on a kids bike that’s meant to stay on pavement? Funky…in not a great way.

Your post does bring something up that I thought about when originally responding to this thread- why are 26” rigid bikes not offered? Seems like a market that would be flooded with buyers since almost nobody who buys a $400 or less bike is using it for offroading, so the suspension is a waste. It would be cheaper to manufacture and the savings could go into a bump up in components or wheels. ßthis assumes a suspension fork, in volume, costs more than a rigid. It must, right?

26” rigid frame and fork around town and path bikes would be fantastic for kids 10 and up as well as shorter women. As it is, if someone wants a new 26” bike that doesn’t have a suspension fork, the only offerings are comfort step thru bikes.
That used rigid MTB market continues to be undervalued.
mstateglfr is offline  
Old 11-25-15, 12:29 AM
  #10  
Darth Lefty 
Disco Infiltrator
 
Darth Lefty's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Folsom CA
Posts: 10,770

Bikes: Schwinn Paramount, Salsa Timberjack, Diamondback Expert TG, Burley Samba

Mentioned: 63 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1915 Post(s)
Liked 485 Times in 335 Posts
Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
What is the deal with Cdale using a left single side fork on a kids bike that’s meant to stay on pavement? Funky…in not a great way.

Your post does bring something up that I thought about when originally responding to this thread- why are 26” rigid bikes not offered? Seems like a market that would be flooded with buyers since almost nobody who buys a $400 or less bike is using it for offroading, so the suspension is a waste. It would be cheaper to manufacture and the savings could go into a bump up in components or wheels. ßthis assumes a suspension fork, in volume, costs more than a rigid. It must, right?

26” rigid frame and fork around town and path bikes would be fantastic for kids 10 and up as well as shorter women. As it is, if someone wants a new 26” bike that doesn’t have a suspension fork, the only offerings are comfort step thru bikes.
That used rigid MTB market continues to be undervalued.
There are 650A bikes offered. Not a lot.
Fuji Bikes | ROAD | KIDS' SERIES | ACE 650

26" (meaning 559) is mountain bike size and good mountain bikes have suspension so no suspension means bad old bike and who wants a bad old bike? It's all just marketing.
__________________
Genesis 49:16-17
Darth Lefty is offline  
Old 11-25-15, 11:13 AM
  #11  
mel2012
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 331
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
A more global question would be why do 90% of geared kids' bikes have suspension forks? My kids will likely never go mountain biking and what I want are lightweight bikes with narrow tires and rack and fender mounts, features that sadly can only be found at the higher end of the market. As with "hybrid" bikes, I think the mass market is catering to be people who don't really know how they want to use the bike and buy the hype of a "all purpose" bike.

Trek has a rigid fork dual-sport 26" bike for kids:
DS Series | Dual sport | City | Bikes |

as does Islabike:
Islabikes Beinn 26 large ? Lightweight bike for children age 10+
mel2012 is offline  
Old 12-16-15, 10:50 AM
  #12  
CrippledKonaBoy
Banned.
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: south of the Great Lakes
Posts: 195

Bikes: The Kona

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
A 24" bike 'might not last long enough for your liking' (she'll outgrow it too fast to suit you)?

Get over yourself.. Buy a bike that fits the child. THIS is the legitimate niche for big-box-store bikes, to ease the inevitable growth of children.
CrippledKonaBoy is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
lc130
General Cycling Discussion
2
10-16-15 07:11 PM
Hawgsnawt
Recreational & Family
21
08-16-15 08:34 PM
Niloc
Recreational & Family
16
02-10-14 10:00 PM
pbass
Mountain Biking
16
12-11-13 09:14 PM
devildogmech
Recreational & Family
3
03-12-10 10:44 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.