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Capable chain repair tool? Does one exist that can be carried on the bike?

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Capable chain repair tool? Does one exist that can be carried on the bike?

Old 05-18-19, 07:51 PM
  #1  
KC8QVO
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Capable chain repair tool? Does one exist that can be carried on the bike?

If I had to repair a chain at home I'd use my hydraulic press. That isn't very portable.

I have a cheap screw type chain repair tool and tried to use it before - its pretty much worthless as the screw just bends and walks off.

Is there something out there that is good quality and durable enough to work well that I can carry on the bike?
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Old 05-18-19, 07:55 PM
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Try another screw type, they work fine.
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Old 05-18-19, 08:17 PM
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Andrew R Stewart 
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I would suggest a quality chain tool like a Park CT-5. Very common and likely the most common replacement pin if one should break. But I'll add a tip. Once the chain is positioned in the too, the pin is screwed onto the chain's rivet and it mbegins to move slightly. Then back off the tool's pin and restart the screwing in. What this does is let the tool's pin better center on the chain's rivet before plunging into the chain's holes. If the tool's pin hangs up on the edge of the hole two things can happen. One is that the chain plate's hole can be punched larger then wanted. The other is the tool's pin can bend. Once bent it is vastly harder to line up with the next rivet and bend further. Andy
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Old 05-18-19, 08:38 PM
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Originally Posted by KC8QVO View Post
Is there something out there that is good quality and durable enough to work well that I can carry on the bike?
I took a chain tool on a cross-country ride and never used it. What are you doing that you need to carry such a tool? “Durable” implies that you expect to use it a lot.
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Old 05-18-19, 08:47 PM
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Not featherweight at 75g, but this is robust, compact & inexpensive.

https://www.amazon.com/Pedros-Six-Pa...ustomerReviews
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Old 05-18-19, 08:49 PM
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Originally Posted by BCDrums View Post
I took a chain tool on a cross-country ride and never used it. What are you doing that you need to carry such a tool? “Durable” implies that you expect to use it a lot.
I carry this:

https://www.parktool.com/product/min...hain-tool-ct-5

and have on multiple occasions helped someone who has a broken chain on our heavily used MUP/Greenway. It has always been a broken quick link that is now missing, so I usually break the chain for a pin and put it back together one link short. It gets them home. I also carry different speed quick links, but usually the person just wants the chain shortened and do not want to take my quick link as a fix.
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Old 05-18-19, 08:59 PM
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Are you trying to reuse a pin because that is a huge PITA and not a good idea. Pick up some quick links and carry those then you only need the chain tool to break the chain. Even pretty crappy chain tool can break a chain.
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Old 05-18-19, 09:28 PM
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Another vote for Park Tool CT-5.

I managed to mess one up pretty badly, but it took me a decade to do so, and I'm very good at breaking things.
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Old 05-18-19, 09:47 PM
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I have this multitool (different but with the same chain repair) and tried in on a piece of chain I have. Bit harder on the thumb but this work to extract and reattach a new pin.

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Old 05-18-19, 09:57 PM
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https://www.prestacycle.com/product/...ain-accessory/

combined with the Presta ratchet and bits that I now carry instead of a combo multi tool, this really works great
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Old 05-18-19, 10:28 PM
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I have owned many chain tools, never really had a problem with any of them. If the push pin is bent, get a new tool.
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Old 05-18-19, 10:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
I would suggest a quality chain tool like a Park CT-5. Very common and likely the most common replacement pin if one should break. But I'll add a tip. Once the chain is positioned in the too, the pin is screwed onto the chain's rivet and it mbegins to move slightly. Then back off the tool's pin and restart the screwing in. What this does is let the tool's pin better center on the chain's rivet before plunging into the chain's holes. If the tool's pin hangs up on the edge of the hole two things can happen. One is that the chain plate's hole can be punched larger then wanted. The other is the tool's pin can bend. Once bent it is vastly harder to line up with the next rivet and bend further. Andy
+1
You may have to do this 2-3 times before you get a good, straight push.
I'd use a Quicklink for repair. Too many chains that are not supposed to be rejoined with the pin.
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Old 05-18-19, 11:03 PM
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Park I Beam and KMC Missing Link.
Never leave home without them.
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Old 05-19-19, 01:38 AM
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I suggest that you carry a spare chain with you already cut to the correct length on your rides as well as a master link to connect it.

Chain breakers aren't really made to split a chain with no help from the user. A chain pin has been squashed (mushroomed) at the edges, that's what keeps it in the link. When I split a chain at home, I file the head with a file or a dremel before using the tool, that way, it will last for years.

That of course means I don't reuse the pin but that's what master links and pins are for.

Kret

Last edited by krecik; 05-19-19 at 10:41 AM.
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Old 05-19-19, 05:59 AM
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I've found even the ones included in multi tools (as above) adequate for on the road repairs. Generally you are just pushing out one pin to remove the broken link. Quick link for the repair. Technique and patience are key.
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Old 05-19-19, 06:07 AM
  #16  
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Hydraulic press for a chain seems like a bit of overkill to me. At least what I consider a hydraulic press.
https://www.northerntool.com/shop/to...1793_200641793
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Old 05-19-19, 06:10 AM
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Another vote for the CT-5.
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Old 05-19-19, 07:20 AM
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Originally Posted by krecik View Post
Chain breakers aren't really made to split a chain with no help from the user. A chain pin has been squashed (mushroomed) at the edges, that's what keeps it in the link. When I split a chain at home, I file the head with a file or a dremel before using the tool, that way, it will last for years.
This is overkill. There is no need to file or Dremel the pin before removal. A decent chain tool will easily remove a riveted pin from any chain if used properly (i.e. aligned over the pin). I have a Park CT-3 that has cut dozens and dozens of chains to length over 25+ years and has never needed a new pin. I carry a very small chain tool on my bike but have only used it once and that was to help another rider who's chain was improperly installed initially.

Carry a quick link for when you really need a road-side chain repair.
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Old 05-19-19, 07:56 AM
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Originally Posted by dedhed View Post
Hydraulic press for a chain seems like a bit of overkill to me.
That was my thought as well. We assembled hundreds of chains daily at Trek, using chain pliers:



But pliers aren't very portable. I carry a "chain pup" with me on rides (I've had it for years and haven't had to use it yet):

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Old 05-19-19, 08:00 AM
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It's not overkill. It seems that in the OP's experience cheap breakers have all bent on chain pins. If you're on a budget and don't want to spend £25 on park stuff, you can get the job done with a cheap chain breaker if you take the necessary steps, that's all I'm saying. It's standard practice with motorbike chains (and yes I know they have a tougher pin) so I see no reason why you shouldn't do it with bike chains to prolong the life of your tools.

It costs almost no time whatsoever to dremel a pin and it's effective. Plus, I think working on a bike on the road is a mess. I personally much prefer to take my time doing it in peace st home. It's the same with inner tubes. If I get a flat, I replace the tube and patch the flat at home, not on the roadside.

If a better tool is what the OP is looking for then park is the way to go, but I'm simply suggesting an improvement to the OP's method.

Kret
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Old 05-19-19, 08:22 AM
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Modern bushing-less flush rivet head derailleur chains are never lengthened,
only shortened and joined with a quick link.

to effect repairs you bring a section of the same chain and more quick links...

So for pressing out the rivet pin, the chain tool can be simple , though it needs to be reliable..


gave a trusty, but not the lightest one, to a friend , he found a lighter, more aluminum one , brought it instead ..

and somewhere in the southern Argentine Andes foothills he had to find a nail and use a rock ,

when the lighter chain tool broke..








.....
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Old 05-19-19, 08:42 AM
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Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
But pliers aren't very portable. I carry a "chain pup" with me on rides (I've had it for years and haven't had to use it yet):

Yeah, I have a couple of those and have them on my daily ride bikes. I used it one time to repair another rider's chain and it worked but it certainly isn't a "shop quality" tool. I haven't seen them for sale in years and wonder if they are still being made.
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Old 05-19-19, 09:43 AM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Modern bushing-less flush rivet head derailleur chains are never lengthened,
only shortened and joined with a quick link.

to effect repairs you bring a section of the same chain and more quick links...

So for pressing out the rivet pin, the chain tool can be simple , though it needs to be reliable..


gave a trusty, but not the lightest one, to a friend , he found a lighter, more aluminum one , brought it instead ..

and somewhere in the southern Argentine Andes foothills he had to find a nail and use a rock ,

when the lighter chain tool broke..
Looooool, yh I see those cheap bike tools that are made out of alu on ebay sometimes. Total rubbish, hard learned lesson that is.
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Old 05-19-19, 10:14 AM
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Originally Posted by krecik View Post
I suggest that you carry a spare chain with you already cut to the correct length with you on your rides as well as a master link to connect it.
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Old 05-19-19, 11:09 AM
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Originally Posted by krecik View Post
I suggest that you carry a spare chain with you already cut to the correct length on your rides as well as a master link to connect it............
The OP wanted a LIGHT WEIGHT TOOL to carry.
Not a heavy chain.
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