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* * Battery Life - 24v

Old 09-05-19, 12:10 PM
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Paul Heckmann
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Question * * Battery Life - 24v

I have a Trailmaker Ebike that I ride the heck out of. Had it just over two years and outside of several months after a nasty fall (full elbow reconstruct) I ride about 15 miles, 4 times a week. I would guess I have done this for about 18 months of that time. That would make about 288 rides (and charges). At 15 miles per, I guess that would be just over 4k miles. I am a big guy at 215lbs too


I turn the power off anytime I am on a flat, but I notice that I am getting maybe 15 miles total even with it used part time.


This is a Trailmaker EBike with a 24 volt 10ah Lithium-Ion battery


This is my first time using an ebike. What is the average normal lifespan on a battery?
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Old 09-05-19, 01:16 PM
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What was the range when new? Trailmaker claims a 15-25 mile range. That will vary with terrain, speed, and load. A 300w 24v motor is relatively low power, so with a "big guy" riding it I would expect less than their estimated maximum.

There are too many variables to come up with an "average normal lifespan." Most references I have seen say 200 - 400 charge cycles, so they are really just guesstimating. I drive an electric car that will probably have well into the thousands of cycles over it's lifespan. But the car has a far more extensive battery maintenance system than any ebike.

LIon batteries have 3 major enemies: Overcharging, deep discharge, and temperature extremes. Any of these can shorten the life of the battery, so never run it until "dead" and don't store it in a hot (or freezing) garage. Overcharging should be prevented by the charging and cell balancing system design. Proper care is the secret to extend the life. There are many articles on the internet that would give you good info.

I am also a "big guy" in the same weight range - my bike has a 500w geared motor with a 36V 12ah LIFeP04 battery - not a particularly powerful bike, but adequate for my riding. I have about 3000 miles with approx 200 charging cycles on it. When new, a 25 mile ride on mixed terrain left about 1/2 power remaining. Now the same ride leaves about 40%, so I see some degradation. I hope to be able to ride it to 4000 miles before replacing it - it just depends on how quickly it may degrade. If I can ride 25 miles with 20 -25% remaining I'll be happy. I do remove the battery and store it inside the house during the winter
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Old 09-05-19, 01:32 PM
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Paul Heckmann
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Originally Posted by MNebiker View Post
What was the range when new? Trailmaker claims a 15-25 mile range. That will vary with terrain, speed, and load. A 300w 24v motor is relatively low power, so with a "big guy" riding it I would expect less than their estimated maximum.

There are too many variables to come up with an "average normal lifespan." Most references I have seen say 200 - 400 charge cycles, so they are really just guesstimating. I drive an electric car that will probably have well into the thousands of cycles over it's lifespan. But the car has a far more extensive battery maintenance system than any ebike.

LIon batteries have 3 major enemies: Overcharging, deep discharge, and temperature extremes. Any of these can shorten the life of the battery, so never run it until "dead" and don't store it in a hot (or freezing) garage. Overcharging should be prevented by the charging and cell balancing system design. Proper care is the secret to extend the life. There are many articles on the internet that would give you good info.

I am also a "big guy" in the same weight range - my bike has a 500w geared motor with a 36V 12ah LIFeP04 battery - not a particularly powerful bike, but adequate for my riding. I have about 3000 miles with approx 200 charging cycles on it. When new, a 25 mile ride on mixed terrain left about 1/2 power remaining. Now the same ride leaves about 40%, so I see some degradation. I hope to be able to ride it to 4000 miles before replacing it - it just depends on how quickly it may degrade. If I can ride 25 miles with 20 -25% remaining I'll be happy. I do remove the battery and store it inside the house during the winter
Good stuff. FYI - I am guessing it was about 18-20 when new. Never really tapped the top end of it as my loop when I bought it was some15 miles long. I moved and the new loop is either 16.1 or 17.8. Both run out of juice before I end the ride. I would like to go longer but I cant trust my surgically repaired knees, back or elbow if I get stuck.

BTW - the elbow reconstruction shortened my right arm 1 1/2" plus about 20 degrees from straightening, went through three bar changes/flipping the yoke before settling on 5" risers with a slight angle on the front camber. If you can imagine standing up for hours vs slightly bending your knees and trying to stand for 5 minutes, that is what happened. You lock your elbows when you ride, but I cant lock my right anymore, so the adaption is bringing the bar toward me via the riser bars with it slightly farther away on the left, easing the pressure on the right. It does take some adapting, but the alternative is not to ride. That ain't happening
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Old 09-05-19, 01:48 PM
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A thought, before I invest in a new battery, is there a chance for an easy upgrade? A self generator perhaps? Move to 36 or 48? Cost?
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Old 09-05-19, 04:24 PM
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I ran into a similar situation years ago when I sold a pair of hybrid/commuter bikes to a couple. She also had a damaged arm and could not reach the straight bar. If I remember correctly, the fix involved a more curved bar and some creative bending. Worked out OK for her.

Converting to a higher voltage probably would not be cost-effective as you would have to upgrade many components - controller, higher wattage motor, etc. Since you are probably looking at a battery replacement, a better solution would be to replace it with a higher capacity 24v unit - maybe 12 - 14ah. Amperage on an ebike battery is like gas tank capacity on a car - the bigger size means more range. The 10 or 20% increase might give you the range you want with a bit of a cushion so you would not exhaust the battery. You may have to do some adapting of the mounting to accommodate a bigger pack, but it may be your best bet.

Last edited by MNebiker; 09-05-19 at 04:29 PM.
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Old 09-05-19, 04:38 PM
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Originally Posted by MNebiker View Post
I ran into a similar situation years ago when I sold a pair of hybrid/commuter bikes to a couple. She also had a damaged arm and could not reach the straight bar. If I remember correctly, the fix involved a more curved bar and some creative bending. Worked out OK for her.

Converting to a higher voltage probably would not be cost-effective as you would have to upgrade many components - controller, higher wattage motor, etc. Since you are probably looking at a battery replacement, a better solution would be to replace it with a higher capacity 24v unit - maybe 12 - 14ah. Amperage on an ebike battery is like gas tank capacity on a car - the bigger size means more range. The 10 or 20% increase might give you the range you want with a bit of a cushion so you would not exhaust the battery. You may have to do some adapting of the mounting to accommodate a bigger pack, but it may be your best bet.
thanks, I will do a cost check on that
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Old 09-05-19, 04:39 PM
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I guess I could also buy a new battery and strap the old one on the back rack to be used the first runs out. Should get 30ish miles out of two of them.
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Old 09-05-19, 04:46 PM
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You only have about 240wh, so I'm not too surprised that you are only getting about 15 miles. The lower voltage also means higher amps. A higher current draw also affects the usable watt hours. Your weight is also a factor. It does sound though, like you are getting the low end of what could be expected. That may be due to the age of the battery. But you don't say that you have noticed a decline in battery life.
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Old 09-06-19, 10:11 AM
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Based on the kind of mileage I see when riding my ebikes (I'm 190 pounds), your battery is effectively providing only 150 Watt-hours, suggesting you've lost almost half of its capacity.

Is it this ebike? Back in 2015, I really considered buying one like that. It was around $700 then, but I wound up building one with a $220 kit and a $280 36V battery,. Some of their 24V bikes used lead-acid batteries too, if I recall,

https://x-tremescooters.com/products...ite-24-volt#/4

36V would be a good upgrade. The system will use less current at higher voltage. The motor should be OK, but you would have to change out controller/display and that is only for people comfortable with wiring and soldering. I've changed controllers on my conversions and on one store bought. It's a lot of rewiring.

You should be able to buy another 24V pack for around $200.
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Old 09-06-19, 01:44 PM
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Yeah a 24v battery's gotta work hard, the same amp hours at 36v is like 50% more capacity and continuous amps.

A 10ah 24v battery here is 100 quid but I'd want two.
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Old 09-06-19, 05:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Doc_Wui View Post
Based on the kind of mileage I see when riding my ebikes (I'm 190 pounds), your battery is effectively providing only 150 Watt-hours, suggesting you've lost almost half of its capacity.

Is it this ebike? Back in 2015, I really considered buying one like that. It was around $700 then, but I wound up building one with a $220 kit and a $280 36V battery,. Some of their 24V bikes used lead-acid batteries too, if I recall,

36V would be a good upgrade. The system will use less current at higher voltage. The motor should be OK, but you would have to change out controller/display and that is only for people comfortable with wiring and soldering. I've changed controllers on my conversions and on one store bought. It's a lot of rewiring.

You should be able to buy another 24V pack for around $200.
That is the bike. Batteries are $289. Havent found a discount for this particular one yet
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Old 09-06-19, 05:38 PM
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I think what I will now have to consider, selling my bike and upgrading a bit. Not too concerned about power, more about longevity of the ride. If I am going to spend $300 on a new battery and upgrade to 36v which I'm sure will be a couple of hundred or so, thats already $500. Thats probably either a quarter or third on a better bike with better electrical

I would definitely find one that is local in Dallas. Purchasing one from Electropedal was a mess, the brand new bike with brand new battery didnt work. I had to go through hell to get a replacement and even had to pay the shipping costs to get it done. I dont think I hit the road for about 4 -5 months after I bought it
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Old 09-07-19, 12:41 PM
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I've got a Magnum Metro. 500watt hub drive with 48V 13AH battery. I'm 140 lbs and I'm pretty sure I could easily get 50+ miles out of it if I use ECO mode. I also have a mid drive mountain bike with plus size tires. 250 watt motor with 36V 500WH (14AH) battery. The day I picked it up it only had 3 of out of 5 bars on the battery and I was able to complete a 27 mile ride with it having a bit of battery life.
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Old 09-07-19, 01:27 PM
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I am leaning toward a new bike. The cost of a new battery, the cost of upgrading the electrical... found a nice new one close by with 48v, 350W, 7 speed. $1899 new.

Now that I have an idea what I need, I realized that the power part was secondary to longevity of the battery.
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Old 09-24-19, 07:15 AM
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I think this should be a NCM Lithium battery. For normal use, its about 500 times cycle life. but this can still remains 80% capacity. Only if this is a brand new battery.
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Old 09-24-19, 10:25 AM
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Normally I wouldn't suggest a Chinese supplier, but just for interest I purchased a 36V, 10ah battery from Unit Pack Power (Micah Toll, electrek has recommended them at times), for $184 with charger (ebay). They will configure the battery the way you want and shipped it within a month (might have been a lot less, but I didn't need it so don't know for sure). I keep it in an ammo box since I don't trust Chinese batteries fully, but it seems well made to me. Also, as Doc said, depending on your controller, you might be able to use a 36V battery for extra speed and/or distance.
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