Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Cool Fuji Royale builds

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Cool Fuji Royale builds

Old 06-19-19, 11:51 AM
  #1  
CaptainMoeswae
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: New York, NY
Posts: 5

Bikes: Fuji Royale 1979

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Cool Fuji Royale builds

I have a Fuji Royale (1979?) in great condition and I want to know what mods/builds people have done to this bike. Would love to try to make the bike a bit more modern to take on tours, though it runs great as is.

Please post your builds and parts used!
CaptainMoeswae is offline  
Old 06-19-19, 01:55 PM
  #2  
Velo Mule
Senior Member
 
Velo Mule's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Long Island
Posts: 429

Bikes: Trek 800 x 2, Schwinn Heavy Duti, Electra Cantilever, Schwinn Traveler, Schwinn Le Tour Luxe, Hybrid Drive concoction

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 121 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
It is your bike, change what ever you want. Comfort first, so find a saddle that you like. On my traveler, I have those 'safety lever' brake levers. When I took the lever off, the reach is longer, so I am thinking about switching the brake levers. You might have a similar situation. New derailleurs are nice, however, changing a derailleur is going down a wormhole. You will be tempted to change to a six speed freewheel, then think, maybe I should get freehub, then I can get index shifting. Then things are changing a lot.

What ever you change, save the original stuff.

That is my option. It is your bike. Whatever you do get and post pictures. While there is a lot of high end stuff here many of us like the production bikes.
Velo Mule is offline  
Old 06-19-19, 01:59 PM
  #3  
CaptainMoeswae
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: New York, NY
Posts: 5

Bikes: Fuji Royale 1979

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Velo Mule View Post
It is your bike, change what ever you want. Comfort first, so find a saddle that you like. On my traveler, I have those 'safety lever' brake levers. When I took the lever off, the reach is longer, so I am thinking about switching the brake levers. You might have a similar situation. New derailleurs are nice, however, changing a derailleur is going down a wormhole. You will be tempted to change to a six speed freewheel, then think, maybe I should get freehub, then I can get index shifting. Then things are changing a lot.

What ever you change, save the original stuff.

That is my option. It is your bike. Whatever you do get and post pictures. While there is a lot of high end stuff here many of us like the production bikes.
Yeah it's crazy how many are options are available with the bike if I dig deep enough, but that's exactly why I wanna see what others have done. Will likely change up the brakes and brake levers first since that seems like the simplest upgrade.
CaptainMoeswae is offline  
Old 06-19-19, 05:52 PM
  #4  
Velo Mule
Senior Member
 
Velo Mule's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Long Island
Posts: 429

Bikes: Trek 800 x 2, Schwinn Heavy Duti, Electra Cantilever, Schwinn Traveler, Schwinn Le Tour Luxe, Hybrid Drive concoction

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 121 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
Most here would recommend the Cool Stop Salmon brake pads for vintage brakes. It is a good upgrade.

One more note, I have a motor that I bought and spindle that will fit a wire wheel because I was removing rust from steel. I went to Harbor Freight after seeing what several BikeForum members were doing and I bought a cotton buffing wheel and polishing compound for aluminum. This and some work will make your old parts look new or even better than new.

Yyour old brake calipers may look pretty good after some attention with the buffer and the Cool Stop pads will get your stopping power to better than new or as good as modern brakes.

Again, my opinion.
Velo Mule is offline  
Old 06-20-19, 04:47 AM
  #5  
SurferRosa
Senior Member
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 1,172

Bikes: old school 531c & campy

Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 506 Post(s)
Liked 143 Times in 87 Posts
Originally Posted by Velo Mule View Post
Most here would recommend the Cool Stop Salmon brake pads...
Kool-Stop
SurferRosa is offline  
Old 06-20-19, 05:24 AM
  #6  
NoControl 
Look Ma! No Hands!
 
NoControl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 1,573

Bikes: Bilenky Tourlite

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 777 Post(s)
Liked 31 Times in 29 Posts
I like the older, all-original drop bar bikes, but some are just begging for modern components, especially if the OG components are beat. A lot of the lugged steel frames with stamped drop-outs are perfect candidates for a Nexus upgrade. Recently, I've been rebuilding a lot of older Japanese-made mixte frames this way, and the ladies love 'em.

@CaptainMoeswae - I'd like to tell you that you can definitely build a beautiful retro-modern bike simply by replacing all of the components, but as someone else has mentioned before, the rabbit hole is very deep. You can easily out-spend what the value of the bike is worth. Oh, certainly you will end up with a tasty, personalized bike to call your own, but all of those individual parts cost big cash in the end. Just something to remember.
__________________
"I have never been lost, but I will admit to being confused for several weeks" -Daniel Boone

"You can't go back and change the beginning, but you can start where you are and change the ending" -C.S. Lewis

"Sobriety sucks." -Me
NoControl is offline  
Old 06-20-19, 07:07 PM
  #7  
cycleheimer
Senior Member
 
cycleheimer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: New York Metro Area
Posts: 4,010

Bikes: '14 Insight 2, '95 Trek 720 Multi-Track, '94 Cannondale M600; '92 Raleigh Dash Max; '86 Panasonic DX 5000, '81 Fuji S12S, '81 Fuji Royale; '78 Bridgestone Diamond Touring, '78 Motobecane Grand Touring, plus many more!

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 125 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 14 Times in 10 Posts
I put SunTour bar cons and a Blackburn rack on my '81. I also changed the pedals. Most importantly, I regreased all the bearings and put new tires, tubes, and rim liners on it. I also double wrapped the bars for comfort. You could upgrade the seat post and binder bolt if you like, but these bikes are alright as they are. Very dependable and solid riders. If you want more, look for a Fuji America from the same era. I have come close to driving 200+ miles for one on several occassions, mostly in the $200 range, but have to answer go a higher authority on these matters... and she can be pretty tough!
cycleheimer is offline  
Old 06-21-19, 12:55 AM
  #8  
greg3rd48 
Senior Member
 
greg3rd48's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Bronx, NYC
Posts: 1,779

Bikes: '19 Fuji Gran Fondo 1.5, '72 Peugeot PX10, '74 Peugeot U08, '78 Fuji Newest, '89 Fuji Ace, '94 Cannondale R600

Mentioned: 72 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 240 Post(s)
Liked 35 Times in 24 Posts
This is an '81 Royale that I cleaned up for my brother a while back. There have since been other minor changes made to the bike (better saddle, new bar tape, other pedals) but this was its initial iteration. He loves this bike.


IMG_0568 by irishbx4th, on Flickr
greg3rd48 is offline  
Likes For greg3rd48:
Old 06-21-19, 07:26 AM
  #9  
simmonsgc
Senior Member
 
simmonsgc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: NC High Country
Posts: 646
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 80 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Here's one that passed through my hands a while back. I liked the centerpulls and the chrome socks, and it had a really smooth ride. It was a touch small for me, so it moved along to a happy new owner.

simmonsgc is offline  
Likes For simmonsgc:
Old 06-21-19, 12:23 PM
  #10  
CaptainMoeswae
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: New York, NY
Posts: 5

Bikes: Fuji Royale 1979

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Those are some beautiful bikes! Just got TRP RRL brake levers fitted to my own bike. Also replaced brakes with side pull Tektro's, got new pedals, a Bontrager saddle, new tires and tubes. Wish I could post pics but I am still pretty new to these forums! Anywho, the bike rides great!

I also have in my possession a Dura-Ace RD-6800 10spd and corresponding 11-23T cassette. Any chance I'd be able to put those on? I suspect I'd need new shifters, wheels, and front derailleur.

Wonder what else other people have done with their Fuji bikes!
CaptainMoeswae is offline  
Old 06-21-19, 07:37 PM
  #11  
Cougrrcj 
Over forty victim of Fate
 
Cougrrcj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 3,045

Bikes: A few...

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 309 Post(s)
Liked 18 Times in 12 Posts
Over the past 40+ years, my old '75 S-10S (pretty much the predecessor to the Royale) has been 'upgraded' a bunch.

First (just a dew weeks after purchase) came the SunTour barcons - that are STILL on the bike today. Same for the oft-maligned Pletscher rear rack, tire savers, and Zefal Hp frame pump.

Later changes were a SunTour Winner Ultra 6-speed freewheel and Sakae 48-38-28 triple crank. The original SunTour V-GT Luxe rear derailleur gave up after 'only' 40k miles, and was replaced by a newer ARX, and the original Compe V front still shifts the triple crank quite well...

Not sure what pedals are on there since the originals fell apart on a Century ride in '78, and still they wear old-school toe cages and straps...

The handlebar and stem are still original, and so are the brake levers and DiaCompe centerpulls with more modern brake pads but I do have a set of Tektro dual-pivot sidepulls and newer aero levers waiting...

Surprisingly, I'm still using the almost 45-year-old original Fujita Belt saddle on a '80s(?) Nashbar 'suspension' seatpost. The post has a 'knee joint' with an 1" diameter x 1" long elastomer 'puck' in the middle that helps take the 'buzz' out of rough pavement.

Wheelsets? a bunch over the years... The originals were ditched in favor of a custom hand-built (by yours truly!) set within a few months of buying the bike. That set lasted for well over 30k miles. Next came a set of generic cheapies after my custom rear wheel was tacoed while on tour. It currently wears a set of newer (probably mid-80s?) Araya 27x1 hoops on Sunshine Gyromaster sealed bearing hubs.

Anyway, pics:

seatpost:



driveside shot of bike:



Your old Royale should serve you for YEARS to come!
__________________
'75 Fuji S-10S bought new, 52k+ miles and still going!
'84 Univega Gran Tourismo
'84 Univega Viva Sport
'86 Miyata 710
'90 Schwinn Woodlands
Huffy MTB - for trips to corner store
MTB of questionable lineage aka 'Mutt Trail Bike'
Cougrrcj is offline  
Old 06-22-19, 03:13 PM
  #12  
ramzilla
Senior Member
 
ramzilla's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Fernandina Beach FL
Posts: 2,585

Bikes: Vintage Japanese Bicycles

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 428 Post(s)
Liked 25 Times in 23 Posts
Bullet proof I'm tellin ya. Freakin BOMB PROOF. When the planet splodes, that old Fuji will be floatin around in space for infinity!!!!!!!
ramzilla is offline  
Old 06-22-19, 03:46 PM
  #13  
ryansu 
Ride.Smile.Repeat
 
ryansu's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Seattle WA
Posts: 2,110

Bikes: 2009 Handsome Devil, 1978 Motobecane Grand Touring, 1987 Nishiki Cresta GT, Former bikes; 1986 Miyata Trail Runner, 1979 Miyata 912, 2011 VO Rando, 1999 Cannondale R800, 2012 Soma Smoothie, 1986 Schwinn Passage

Mentioned: 63 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 559 Post(s)
Liked 143 Times in 114 Posts
One suggestion, from experience, is to ride the bike a fair bit before upgrading it the hilt to be sure it fits, you like the ride etc and to get a better idea of what you like and don't about the specific bike. Its one thing to spend $$ on a keeper that you are building up to suit you but if you decide that its not quite right your stuck with upgrades others may not be interested in paying for if you decide to sell, ask me how I know. . As others have said keep all the original stuff you replace.

So ride it allot, over varied terrain and get a feel for whether its a love it or like it bike. If you do decide to upgrade then the options are vast, I like upgrading the brakes to aero tektro's both to gain a quick release and because I find the more chunky hoods are comfortable for my hands. A good set of tires, replacing steel wheels with alloy, finding a saddle you like and using Kool stop brake pads are all good places to start.
ryansu is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Nateuofmn
Bicycle Mechanics
6
07-19-13 10:17 AM
ESW116
Bicycle Mechanics
12
04-07-12 02:35 PM
tpelle
Bicycle Mechanics
11
03-22-12 05:42 PM
shortshorts
Road Cycling
7
02-03-12 07:24 AM
trek5000
Long Distance Competition/Ultracycling, Randonneuring and Endurance Cycling
4
12-13-09 08:30 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.