Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Mountain Biking
Reload this Page >

New Budget Hardtail vs used High End Hardtail?

Notices
Mountain Biking Mountain biking is one of the fastest growing sports in the world. Check out this forum to discuss the latest tips, tricks, gear and equipment in the world of mountain biking.

New Budget Hardtail vs used High End Hardtail?

Old 08-21-19, 02:22 PM
  #1  
jrhoneOC
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Newport Beach, Ca.
Posts: 77

Bikes: 2020 Rockhopper Comp 1x

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked 26 Times in 21 Posts
New Budget Hardtail vs used High End Hardtail?

OK...I'm SURE this has been addressed, but I am looking at all my options. I'm 50 and haven't ridden a MTB in 20 years. My last bike was a '96 Rockhopper Comp FS. Loved it. Plan on doing some general riding, some trails, some single tracks. Nothing too crazy. My first thought was to go down to Specialized and buy the current Rockhopper Expert or Comp and be done with it. Then I thought, what about if I bought a used bike thats a few years old but a higher level bike? Then to confuse things...what about a used low end bike for a few hundred, and then spend a few hundred on mods? So the 3 options...


1. $800 for a new mid level bike.

2. $600-900 on a used high end bike.

3. $300 on a used mid level bike and then spend $400 on mods and upgrades.


Option 1...Looking at Rockhopper...What else should I be looking at? 1X vs 2X drivetrain? Other brands and models? Giant? Trek? Cannondale?

Option 2...Used Crave? Used Giant XTC Carbon? Used Rockhopper Expert or other brand equivalents?

Option 3...Used Rockhopper or other brand equivalents (2014-2015ish?) and then upgrade drivetrain, brakes, maybe wheels and fork.


Would an old guy like me really benefit or notice some things like the 1x vs 2x drivetrain? I have read hydraulic brakes vs mechanical brakes is a must. In the past it was common knowledge to stay away from the low end components, weight and functionality were not great. Still the same? Tubeless?
jrhoneOC is offline  
Old 08-21-19, 10:31 PM
  #2  
niknak
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 719
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 59 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Look for a bike with the following:
1. dropper post
2. tubeless compatible rims (get nice tubeless tires)
3. hydro brakes (if you go used avoid Avids)
4. rear derailleur with a clutch (1x or 2x not as important)

I wouldn't want to spend money on a mountain bike that didn't have these components. Others may disagree. I would also look for a slightly used better bike than buy a cheap bike and add upgrades. That'll cost more down the road.
niknak is offline  
Old 08-22-19, 07:02 AM
  #3  
qclabrat
Senior Member
 
qclabrat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 952
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 92 Post(s)
Liked 17 Times in 15 Posts
how are you with bike maintenance?
Consider year end deals at your LBS
qclabrat is offline  
Old 08-22-19, 08:21 AM
  #4  
freeranger
Senior Member
 
freeranger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 1,267

Bikes: 06 Lemond Reno, 96 GT Timberline mtn.bike

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Liked 35 Times in 26 Posts
I"m still riding my '96 GT (with upgrades) hardtail on the trails, and it sounds to me like you're riding the same type of trails (not too technical) as I. If it was me, I'd look for a good condition mtn.bike with a good frame and wheels, minimum of 2x8, 1x9, or more (and if a late model would probably be more than an 8 spd.cassette anyway). I'm still using v-brakes with no problem, tho sure wouldn't mind having disks. If you're OK with working on your own bike, replacing parts, making adjustments-you can end up with a very nice bike without spending a lot. And you heard right about staying away from lower end components-but usually it's derailleurs and shifters, which are not super expensive and are easily replaced.
freeranger is offline  
Old 08-22-19, 10:16 PM
  #5  
Canker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,281
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 176 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
5. Tapered headtube
If you are looking at older used or new/newer cheaper bikes a lot will have straight steerer tubes which will greatly hinder your ability to upgrade to a new better fork.
Canker is offline  
Old 08-22-19, 10:31 PM
  #6  
Sidewalk
I ride all the bikes
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Loma Linda, CA
Posts: 13

Bikes: Super6 Evo, Enduro, F-Si, and a few others.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
I would recommend finding something using modern standards. No 26", 142 or 148 rear axle. Tapered head tube, etc. If you don't go with modern standards it may be more expense to repair or update than it is worth. So an older low cost bike might not be a deal.

Buying a cheap used bike, beating on it for a few, then dumping it isn't a bad idea. It gives you some time to decide what kind of mountain biking you actually want to do.

MTB is my primary sport.
Sidewalk is offline  
Old 08-23-19, 06:15 AM
  #7  
JonathanGennick 
Senior Member
 
JonathanGennick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Munising, Michigan, USA
Posts: 4,130

Bikes: Priority 600, Priority Continuum, Devinci Dexter

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 683 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 48 Times in 30 Posts
Originally Posted by jrhoneOC View Post
3. $300 on a used mid level bike and then spend $400 on mods and upgrades.
Avoid this ^^^ option. Spend more up front on something you'll enjoy. Immediately upgrading is not cost effective.

If buying used, don't go too far back in time because recent thinking around geometry has been good for the sport by making bikes more fun to ride and riders less likely to crash.

Would an old guy like me really benefit or notice some things like the 1x vs 2x drivetrain? I have read hydraulic brakes vs mechanical brakes is a must. In the past it was common knowledge to stay away from the low end components, weight and functionality were not great. Still the same? Tubeless?
I personally don't feel strongly on the drivetrain question. Either 1x or 2x is good by me. Hydro brakes are nice, but I wouldn't use the word "must". What you'll notice about brakes is that these days mechanical brakes are mainly spec'd on low-end bikes. Tubeless gets pushed harder than it deserves.
JonathanGennick is offline  
Old 08-23-19, 07:56 AM
  #8  
Sidewalk
I ride all the bikes
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Loma Linda, CA
Posts: 13

Bikes: Super6 Evo, Enduro, F-Si, and a few others.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
Tubeless is pushed harder than it deserves? That's like saying "these shifter things on your brake levers are over rated, downtube is all you need".

Tubes on MTB need to die, now.
Sidewalk is offline  
Old 08-23-19, 11:37 AM
  #9  
hig4s
Senior Member
 
hig4s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Florida
Posts: 658

Bikes: Evil Insurgent, Giant Stance, Wife has Liv Cypress, son has Motobecane HT529

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 92 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by Sidewalk View Post
Tubeless is pushed harder than it deserves? That's like saying "these shifter things on your brake levers are over rated, downtube is all you need".

Tubes on MTB need to die, now.
Unless your riding style causes lots of pinch flats, or you ride in a area with lots of thorns causing flats, I don't see why the recreational rider would care.
Both my bikes are tubeless ready, yet I have had only three flats in four years with tubes. I see no reason to go through the hassle of changing. Besides, even if you are running tubeless, you need to carry a spare tube if you have tire problems on the trail.

to the OP, 6. full air fork.
hig4s is offline  
Old 08-23-19, 11:46 AM
  #10  
Sidewalk
I ride all the bikes
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Loma Linda, CA
Posts: 13

Bikes: Super6 Evo, Enduro, F-Si, and a few others.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
Originally Posted by hig4s View Post
Unless your riding style causes lots of pinch flats, or you ride in a area with lots of thorns causing flats, I don't see why the recreational rider would care.
Both my bikes are tubeless ready, yet I have had only three flats in four years with tubes. I see no reason to go through the hassle of changing. Besides, even if you are running tubeless, you need to carry a spare tube if you have tire problems on the trail.

to the OP, 6. full air fork.
You also gain the added traction and comfort advantage of lower air pressures. Besides the virtually no flats thing.

Maybe it's a roadie thing to suggest tubes?
Sidewalk is offline  
Old 08-25-19, 09:13 PM
  #11  
qclabrat
Senior Member
 
qclabrat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 952
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 92 Post(s)
Liked 17 Times in 15 Posts
your prices are a bit off
New entry bikes are about 800, mid range models are at least double
used highend hardtail bikes, good examples are 2-3 times what you are estimating

you asked about Giants, some new prices:

entry level: Talon $750

mid level: Fathom $1500

high level: XTC $4000
qclabrat is offline  
Old 09-01-19, 02:05 PM
  #12  
hig4s
Senior Member
 
hig4s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Florida
Posts: 658

Bikes: Evil Insurgent, Giant Stance, Wife has Liv Cypress, son has Motobecane HT529

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 92 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by Sidewalk View Post
You also gain the added traction and comfort advantage of lower air pressures. Besides the virtually no flats thing.

Maybe it's a roadie thing to suggest tubes?
Just spent four days at Snowshow resort riding down hill. While I am slow and don't do hardly any jumping, ran as low as 20psi on smooth trails, and ran 25psi on M and O tech trails, not one issue with my tubes. Did see one tubeless rider burp a tire and have to walk out of a technical trail.
hig4s is offline  
Old 09-01-19, 04:28 PM
  #13  
jrhoneOC
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Newport Beach, Ca.
Posts: 77

Bikes: 2020 Rockhopper Comp 1x

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked 26 Times in 21 Posts
OP here...so just picked up a brand new 2020 Rockhopper Comp 1x. Its got hydraulic brakes, a 1x9 drivetrain and a basic shock. I got it at a no tax sale saving me a few bucks. It was the only 1x drivetrain bike i saw under $1000. Yes its a microshift system but everyone seems to think its a pretty good system and it was by far smoother than the other low end 2x and 3x drivetrains i test rode. Now to get on some trails!! I will look into a few things down the road. Tubeless (not sure if these are tubeless compatible wheels? I think they are), upgraded shock, maybe going to a 1x12 (microshift makes an inexpensive system that maybe i can swap out some parts and easily get an even wiser gear range if needed.)

Here is a pic....


Last edited by jrhoneOC; 09-03-19 at 04:30 PM.
jrhoneOC is offline  
Likes For jrhoneOC:
Old 09-04-19, 01:44 PM
  #14  
qclabrat
Senior Member
 
qclabrat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 952
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 92 Post(s)
Liked 17 Times in 15 Posts
nice, congrats
qclabrat is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
breeze14
Mountain Biking
4
02-12-19 07:59 AM
rosefarts
Mountain Biking
33
08-10-17 08:10 AM
deevee
Mountain Biking
15
05-12-15 07:24 AM
supercooper
General Cycling Discussion
3
06-24-14 12:59 PM
formula4speed
Mountain Biking
3
03-05-13 08:19 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.