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Fiberglass and Resin for Repairs in Remote Areas?

Old 06-23-14, 02:57 AM
  #26  
Rowan
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Originally Posted by mdilthey View Post
This was the question:

"Is anyone else repairing things with fiberglass? How would I go about learning how to use it, and are the materials portable enough for ultralight bike touring and bikepacking?"

With some very helpful exceptions, most of the responses are from people who have never performed a fiberglass repair in their lives. They just want to tell me how wrong I am for even seeking the knowledge of a material i'm unfamiliar with in this application.

The plural of opinion is not data.

Rowan, i don't remember saying anything snooty. The only thing I see that resembles snooty is you putting your advice in a lockbox publicly, like you're the arbiter of knowledge and i'm unworthy for even considering challenging your word... That's never the kind of advice i'm after anyways.
And now you have moved beyond snooty to just plain unpleasant.
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Old 06-23-14, 07:10 AM
  #27  
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[Admin deleted. Please do not bring up members who have nothing to do with this thread, thank you. Some good advice from your own keyboard ---------->] Try to stay on topic, please... this is far from constructive.

Last edited by Siu Blue Wind; 06-23-14 at 03:36 PM.
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Old 06-23-14, 08:29 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by dbg View Post
I've become a huge fan of Fiberfix since seeing it on Shark Tank and ordering some for very successful home reapairs.

FiberFix | Welcome

It is simple to use, only requires water to activate, and becomes rock hard in 10 minutes. I plan to carry a small packet of it (lightweight also) on future touring rides.

adding: I've worked plenty with fiberglass and carbon fiber. The epoxy is messy and can be difficult to work with. That fiberfix stuff is MUCH easier to work with.
I saw that on another thread and it is intriguing. You could just keep a sealed package with you, and it looks easy to apply. What have you used it for?
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Old 06-24-14, 02:20 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by dbg View Post
I've become a huge fan of Fiberfix since seeing it on Shark Tank and ordering some for very successful home reapairs.

FiberFix | Welcome

It is simple to use, only requires water to activate, and becomes rock hard in 10 minutes. I plan to carry a small packet of it (lightweight also) on future touring rides.

adding: I've worked plenty with fiberglass and carbon fiber. The epoxy is messy and can be difficult to work with. That fiberfix stuff is MUCH easier to work with.
+ 1 on Fiberfix, roll of this and some JB Weld and you're set for several fixes. Both light and small to carry.
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Old 06-25-14, 09:24 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by wphamilton View Post
I saw that on another thread and it is intriguing. You could just keep a sealed package with you, and it looks easy to apply. What have you used it for?
Here's an example. The shaft of a tall floor lamp snapped off. Plenty of weight in the top (bulb, socket, harp, shade) and no way would duct tape even come close to supporting it. I soaked a small strip of fiberfix in water and wrapped it around the break. In 10 minutes it was rock hard. I banged it around pretty good just to test it out and was amazed. You can sand this stuff and repaint if needed. I left it raw just to show off how it works.




BTW there was no overlap or insertion between the two broken ends. It was just two broken ends butted against each other. ALL the support comes from the wrap.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
fiberfix.jpg (91.2 KB, 11 views)

Last edited by dbg; 06-25-14 at 09:29 AM.
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Old 06-25-14, 11:07 AM
  #31  
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That is pretty incredible stuff, dbg. I'll be strongly considering this stuff for a fix on unsupported bike tours.
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Old 06-25-14, 11:34 AM
  #32  
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International parcel delivery services are making No place really un supported by now ..
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Old 06-25-14, 11:56 AM
  #33  
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To practice with fiberglass/resin, you need three things, all of which you can get in your local Home Depot for about $20: some fiberglass, resin and hardener. You also need a container and a stick to mix this stuff, some way to carry the resin on the road, and gloves. Once you add hardener to the resin, it gets pretty hot and it can melt plastic, so you need to mix it in small quantities, ideally in a glass or metal container (paper might work), and use it quickly.

The general problem with fiberglass repairs is that cured product does not stick very well to other surfaces. If you make a repair like in your 2nd picture where the fiberglass patch goes all around the part and they can't move with respect to each other, it might work. If you just slap a patch of fiberglass onto a crack in a tube, it'll cure and then slide down the tube.

Others here suggested carbon and epoxy instead. Fiberglass/polyester is a budget material that is used when cost is a concern, but it's mechanically inferior to carbon/epoxy. Get some carbon fiber fabric on eBay and a dual squeeze tube of quick-set epoxy in HD. It will give you the same results but the repair will be stronger and the process will be less messy.
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Old 06-25-14, 12:08 PM
  #34  
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dbg, were you able to open the package, cut a section off to use for your repair, and then re-seal the package? Or will it cure from exposure to moisture in the air once unsealed?

Originally Posted by hamster View Post
To practice with fiberglass/resin, you need three things, all of which you can get in your local Home Depot for about $20: some fiberglass, resin and hardener. You also need a container and a stick to mix this stuff, some way to carry the resin on the road, and gloves. ...
hamster, that's what's intriguing about Fiberfix. It is sealed in a package, and that's all you have to carry. Wet it down, wrap it, and that's it.
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Old 06-25-14, 12:21 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by wphamilton View Post
hamster, that's what's intriguing about Fiberfix. It is sealed in a package, and that's all you have to carry. Wet it down, wrap it, and that's it.
Yes, it sounds interesting. I'm curious what's the chemistry involved and how does it compare with CF/epoxy mechanically. Since it's water based, it could be a fiberglass matrix preloaded with some sort of quick-set cement or gypsum.
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Old 06-25-14, 12:24 PM
  #36  
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Break an arm, the stuff they substitute for plaster these days cooks catalytically

when removed from the sealed packaging.. exposed to air.
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Old 06-26-14, 09:36 AM
  #37  
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I presumed opening the sealed package would begin or affect the curing process (but I haven't actually tested that presumption).

I ordered several size packages and would probably just carry one, or a few smaller ones --and plan to use the whole strip when needed.

Compared to the mess of epoxy, it feels very smooth to wrap and hold for the time it takes to solidify. And it's just water (which can come from the supply you're already carrying). Seems super easy to clean up versus the leftover epoxy mixing container and gooey mess.

Last edited by dbg; 06-26-14 at 09:43 AM.
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Old 06-26-14, 11:45 AM
  #38  
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"I'm not asking a general repair question. Sure, duct tape and spit might be a great repair for some things, but I'm asking for specific advice pertaining to fiberglass."

your example and question appears to be about fiberglass thread/cloth/mat and some unidentified resin.
Fiber reinforced plastic composite covers a huge range of materials. The word "fiberglass" only describes the fiber, not the resin matrix. I would not bother carrying or considering fiberglass cloth, polyester/vinylester resin and catalyst for the likely repairs needed on a bicycle. I would consider epoxy and un coated polyester twine, Kevlar or carbon for some joinery between metals if there was no other choice but there's a range of problems doing this kind of repair compared to other kludge repairs. You must absolutely clean off any oil or grease to surfaces being joined. You needs gloves. Alcohol or vinegar to clean anything that touches your skin.

Having some skill repairing canoes and kayaks with epoxy and cloth makes sense because the boats stop being boats with holes in them, bicycles on the other hand have a common set of failures that fiber reinforced plastic materials don't address.
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Old 11-12-14, 09:44 AM
  #39  
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Yes, I used Fiberglass to put a new tip on a Kickstand.

I have also built Fairings, and sort-of , almost a complete Velomobile.

copy and paste the Link in my Signature to see photos
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Old 11-12-14, 11:46 AM
  #40  
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Saw a Film about a Solo Sailor[insert movie stars name here] who was Holed by a Seagoing Commercial Shipping Container, floating, in a well traveled sea-lane area.

that his Fiberglass sailboat struck in the middle of the night .. (Title Forgotten)
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