Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Winter Cycling
Reload this Page >

Winter Cycling Newbie: Advice Wanted

Winter Cycling Don't let snow and ice discourage you this winter. The key element to year-round cycling is proper attire! Check out this winter cycling forum to chat with other ice bike fanatics.

Winter Cycling Newbie: Advice Wanted

Old 01-18-19, 11:28 PM
  #26  
fullergarrett
"Broke College Student"
Thread Starter
 
fullergarrett's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Mid-Missouri, USA
Posts: 87

Bikes: 2016 Giant Sedona, 1987 Free Spirit Pinnacle

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 68 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by JonathanGennick View Post
Those gloves should work. How cold does it get in Missouri? FWIW, I like thinner gloves when temps permit, and sometimes go with a set of cross-country ski gloves. I also run pogies -- see photo below -- on a couple of my bikes. Yesterday I was out in mid-30s temps that were above freezing, and the Moose Mitts in the photo were all that I needed.


The gloves I ended up getting were a little overkill IMHO. The portion of Missouri I live in rarely dips below 10 during the day in the winter. It's mostly windchill, however, that will get you. For instance, the windchill this weekend is supposed to be in the negatives.

Originally Posted by parkbrav View Post
If you don't like the weather around here, wait 5 minutes. hah. Sunday will snow, freezing-rain, then quick freeze around 5F Sunday night into Monday morning.

The Weather people are saying that the Polar Vortex will bifurcate this winter, causing weather. BOLO!
Sounds like you're describing Missouri... if you don't like the weather, just wait. This weekend is supposed to get really cold. Last weekend we got snow (my car got snowed in) and this weekend some snow but really cold temperatures.

Originally Posted by DaveQ24 View Post
Hi - I lived with it for 40 years, because no medical professional ever asked the right questions, saw me during an event, or if I asked about breathing problems , they just chalked it up to allergies. For me, hot and humid air actually has caused more symptoms than cold air. I finally got fed up enough to research what possible conditions were consistent with my symptoms, researched pulmonologists by reputation, patient reviews, and education, found one that sounded promising, and made an appointment. The nice thing about that was that they did the basic spirometry testing right there immediately before the appointment, and the results showed I was only able to expell about 43% of lung volume untreated - but it went to over 95% after albuterol (or whatever the drug was they used on me - I think they actually use a differen drug during testing). Blood O2 with moderate exertion was 84 before and 99 after the drug was administered - I remember the numbers because it made a big impression on me, seeing empirical and quantifiable data literally on paper. I walked out of there with prescriptions for albuterol, Singulair, and Symbicort - and after about 10 days/2 weeks I began to realize just what “normal” respiration felt like - without chest pain, shortness of breath, dizzyness, nausea.

I rarely use albuterol - only if I’m exposed to strong irritant like smoke or chemical fumes, but I take Singulair and Symbicort every day, and add in pseudoephedrine many days - that combination gives me about 95% relief. I see the pulmonologist about 3 times a year, and repeat the spirometry test yearly. He’s tinkered with the doses a few times, but keeps me on the same 2 drugs - as he says, why change it if it’s working.

Just putting this out there to encourage people who experience symptoms to get it checked out - there are effective treatments. Personally, I’ve never experienced any side effects from the meds, but some people do, so it’s not perfect and ymmv, as they say.
I should get it checked out. I'm pretty far out of shape - I'm 19 years old, 5'11" and I weigh about 320 pounds. I've been thinking about joining the discussions on the "Clydesdales" forum here. With that being said, I should probably be careful - heart disease is a common issue on both sides of my family. My father has heart failure, both of my maternal grandparents passed away from heart-related issues (one aneurysm, the other had his heart rupture) and both of my paternal grandparents also had heart issues (one had to have bypasses, the other had a pacemaker.)

I don't have a problem riding in hot/humid weather. The problem I've experienced is mainly cold/dry weather. I took my bike out for a spin a few weeks ago when it was in the lower 50s, and even then I started getting that feeling in my lung, with the feeling I was going to start into a lengthy coughing spell afterwards. Sometimes I've also got headaches from it, IIRC.
fullergarrett is online now  
Old 01-28-19, 05:15 PM
  #27  
fullergarrett
"Broke College Student"
Thread Starter
 
fullergarrett's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Mid-Missouri, USA
Posts: 87

Bikes: 2016 Giant Sedona, 1987 Free Spirit Pinnacle

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 68 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
So, a little bit of an update and for some further advice.

My dad brought the bike up Saturday, and I rode it yesterday (Sunday.) The high was 40 degrees with minimal wind. The ride went fairly good, I did take quite a few breaks to catch my breath. The gloves work surprisingly well with the grip shifters. The bike rode smooth and I didn't get "rubber lungs" despite the cold temperatures and my previous experience.

I did ride today - huge mistake. Today the high was only in the mid-30s, with the temperatures plummeting. The winds are raging around 20-30 mph will gusts up to 45 mph. It was not a fun time. I managed to get the bike to class and back home, but just barely. It was a huge struggle - I guess because I'm so out of shape. There were some times where I could only go a little bit before having to pause and take another break.

Later this week it is supposed to dip into the negatives. What should be the "cutoff point" for not riding versus riding? Granted, I'm starting to believe that the cold itself doesn't bother me - it is more the wind blowing and causing me to have to exert a lot more effort.

On a tangent/side note, the bike ran fine. The only issue I noticed was the seat was really uncomfortable in the crotch area. (Not that region, but on the sides near the legs.) Other than that the seat on this bike is comfortable... nothing to write home about, but better than a slab of metal or sitting on the seat post.
fullergarrett is online now  
Old 01-29-19, 05:38 PM
  #28  
parkbrav
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 227
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 116 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by fullergarrett View Post
So, a little bit of an update and for some further advice.
Later this week it is supposed to dip into the negatives. What should be the "cutoff point" for not riding versus riding? Granted, I'm starting to believe that the cold itself doesn't bother me - it is more the wind blowing and causing me to have to exert a lot more effort.
I'm glad that you're having some small victories. I find that's key this time of year, to stay positive.

Every rider has their own cutoff point. We're currently discussing this on another thread. For me, I will accept 0F with some windchill. I'll leave it to the rest of the gang to speak for themselves.

Warm wishes!
parkbrav is offline  
Old 01-30-19, 07:28 AM
  #29  
RidingMatthew 
Let's Ride!
 
RidingMatthew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Triad, NC USA
Posts: 2,343

Bikes: --2010 Jamis 650b1-- 2016 Cervelo R2-- 2018 Salsa Journeyman 650B

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 258 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
my cut off today was 19F with 30-45mph gusts that and my Mrs. asked me not to. I think it was a good call I was out camping this past weekend in the cold and I think my body is tired.
__________________
"Work to eat. Eat to live. Live to bike. Bike to work." --Anonymous ||| "late & alive > early & dead." ~Steely Dan
RidingMatthew is offline  
Old 02-04-19, 04:55 PM
  #30  
fullergarrett
"Broke College Student"
Thread Starter
 
fullergarrett's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Mid-Missouri, USA
Posts: 87

Bikes: 2016 Giant Sedona, 1987 Free Spirit Pinnacle

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 68 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Just got home from another ride where it was -29 (Fahrenheit) and the wind was slightly blowing. Not too terrible.

I noticed what bothers me most is the wind, especially in the eyes. Also the wind blowing against me, causing me to slow down or have to exert much more effort. Really shows how out of shape I am.

Bike is running good, and the gloves really keep my hands warm. Only issue I'm having is that I keep having to readjust the seat height, as the seat post will eventually slide down to the lowest (most uncomfortable) position. I may create another thread for that.

Unfortunately, the weather this winter is pretty cold and wet. I've only had a couple chances to ride my bike, as it's mostly either been too cold, too windy, or too wet/icy.
fullergarrett is online now  
Old 02-05-19, 08:31 AM
  #31  
parkbrav
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 227
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 116 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by fullergarrett View Post
Just got home from another ride where it was -29 (Fahrenheit) and the wind was slightly blowing. Not too terrible.

I noticed what bothers me most is the wind, especially in the eyes.
The same thing happens to me, when it's too cold my eyes start to frost or even freeze shut. The Scott ski goggles I wear seem to prevent that for about one hour, even at 0F
parkbrav is offline  
Old 02-05-19, 12:59 PM
  #32  
parkbrav
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 227
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 116 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by fullergarrett View Post

Bike is running good, and the gloves really keep my hands warm. Only issue I'm having is that I keep having to readjust the seat height, as the seat post will eventually slide down to the lowest (most uncomfortable) position. I may create another thread for that.
I'm not the most mechanically inclined, but I would also suggest a multi-tool that is compatible with your bicycle so that you can make adjustments to your seat if you ever needed to
parkbrav is offline  
Old 02-05-19, 04:16 PM
  #33  
fullergarrett
"Broke College Student"
Thread Starter
 
fullergarrett's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Mid-Missouri, USA
Posts: 87

Bikes: 2016 Giant Sedona, 1987 Free Spirit Pinnacle

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 68 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by parkbrav View Post
The same thing happens to me, when it's too cold my eyes start to frost or even freeze shut. The Scott ski goggles I wear seem to prevent that for about one hour, even at 0F
I was thinking that goggles may be a good way to prevent the tearing up and potential freezing. Perhaps something I should invest in?

But then I still have to worry about the resistance on windy days.
Originally Posted by parkbrav View Post
I'm not the most mechanically inclined, but I would also suggest a multi-tool that is compatible with your bicycle so that you can make adjustments to your seat if you ever needed to
I figured it out in another forum. Turned out there was a knob that just needed to be adjusted, but could only be adjusted when the clamp was open.
fullergarrett is online now  
Old 02-06-19, 05:33 AM
  #34  
rumrunn6
Senior Member
 
rumrunn6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: 25 miles northwest of Boston
Posts: 22,883

Bikes: Bottecchia Sprint, GT Timberline 29r

Mentioned: 87 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3016 Post(s)
Liked 95 Times in 83 Posts
be prepared for "stuff" & hope you have a way to manage it, especially if you live w other ppl & animals. after I laid this stuff out, my cat was not happy & was eye balling it for a retaliation. had to scare it off long enough to get out the door

rumrunn6 is offline  
Old 02-06-19, 08:12 AM
  #35  
parkbrav
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 227
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 116 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by fullergarrett View Post
I was thinking that goggles may be a good way to prevent the tearing up and potential freezing. Perhaps something I should invest in?

But then I still have to worry about the resistance on windy days.

I figured it out in another forum. Turned out there was a knob that just needed to be adjusted, but could only be adjusted when the clamp was open.
I only know what works for me, so I can't say "definitely do this" or "definitely do that." For me, it's been a series of "trial and error." Some people have trouble with foggy goggles, some people say they're too heavy, but I've had success with them, especially in the colder temperatures.
parkbrav is offline  
Old 02-06-19, 01:46 PM
  #36  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 41,928

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 188 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6830 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 210 Times in 175 Posts
40 F above ? not minus 40? That's a typical early morning/evening here it rises to 50F by the afternoon, .
just 10 minutes? long under wear , pants a couple sweat shirts the hoodie and a crew neck ..

and my Parka .. work fine some cheap ski gloves in the pocket of the parka.. thick socks and boots ..

going inside again any sweat absorbed in the cotton sweat shirt dries fast enough.. no 'cotton kills' warnings apply..

you are not staying out hunting ducks in a blind all day....

Just 10 minutes..







.....
fietsbob is offline  
Old 02-07-19, 02:06 PM
  #37  
Notso_fastLane
Senior Member
 
Notso_fastLane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Layton, UT
Posts: 868

Bikes: 2011 Bent TW Elegance 2014 Carbon Strada Velomobile

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 98 Post(s)
Liked 24 Times in 18 Posts
Originally Posted by fullergarrett View Post
The gloves I ended up getting were a little overkill IMHO. The portion of Missouri I live in rarely dips below 10 during the day in the winter. It's mostly windchill, however, that will get you. For instance, the windchill this weekend is supposed to be in the negatives.



Sounds like you're describing Missouri... if you don't like the weather, just wait. This weekend is supposed to get really cold. Last weekend we got snow (my car got snowed in) and this weekend some snow but really cold temperatures.


I should get it checked out. I'm pretty far out of shape - I'm 19 years old, 5'11" and I weigh about 320 pounds. I've been thinking about joining the discussions on the "Clydesdales" forum here. With that being said, I should probably be careful - heart disease is a common issue on both sides of my family. My father has heart failure, both of my maternal grandparents passed away from heart-related issues (one aneurysm, the other had his heart rupture) and both of my paternal grandparents also had heart issues (one had to have bypasses, the other had a pacemaker.)

I don't have a problem riding in hot/humid weather. The problem I've experienced is mainly cold/dry weather. I took my bike out for a spin a few weeks ago when it was in the lower 50s, and even then I started getting that feeling in my lung, with the feeling I was going to start into a lengthy coughing spell afterwards. Sometimes I've also got headaches from it, IIRC.
Have you looked into a trike, either offroad or even a fat trike? (something like this)

The advantage of these is that you can gear them really low and pedal at whatever rate you need to without having to stop and put a foot down, which lets you more easily moderate your exertion level.

The main disadvantages are price, and finding a way to park them.

What was noted above about wearing something over your nose/mouth really can make a difference, since you're breathing in warmer, more humid air. Here in UT, at altitude in the winter (a bad combo for me!), I switched from an open nose mask to one that covers my nose/mouth, and it really improved my breathing.
Notso_fastLane is offline  
Old 02-07-19, 02:27 PM
  #38  
fullergarrett
"Broke College Student"
Thread Starter
 
fullergarrett's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Mid-Missouri, USA
Posts: 87

Bikes: 2016 Giant Sedona, 1987 Free Spirit Pinnacle

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 68 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Notso_fastLane View Post
Have you looked into a trike, either offroad or even a fat trike? (something like this)

The advantage of these is that you can gear them really low and pedal at whatever rate you need to without having to stop and put a foot down, which lets you more easily moderate your exertion level.

The main disadvantages are price, and finding a way to park them.

What was noted above about wearing something over your nose/mouth really can make a difference, since you're breathing in warmer, more humid air. Here in UT, at altitude in the winter (a bad combo for me!), I switched from an open nose mask to one that covers my nose/mouth, and it really improved my breathing.
I haven't looked into a trike. Not to judge a book by the cover, but they look sort of uncomfortable. (Especially the one in the link.) Also, on our campus - parking that thing would nearly be impossible.

I think the biggest issue I had was the seat height. After finding out how to adjust the seat, things got a little easier. But hills are still more difficult on my new bike than it was on my old 12-speed. My 12-speed would power up those hills with little effort, while this new bike has some difficulty.making it up those hills using slightly more effort.

I should probably look into masks, but my main concern is how one would restrict my breathing. I usually breathe pretty hard (especially on hills.) But is there any other options other than balaclavas - the last thing I want is to be confused as a robber or serial killer.
fullergarrett is online now  
Old 02-16-19, 08:12 PM
  #39  
fullergarrett
"Broke College Student"
Thread Starter
 
fullergarrett's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Mid-Missouri, USA
Posts: 87

Bikes: 2016 Giant Sedona, 1987 Free Spirit Pinnacle

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 68 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I haven't noticed the "rubber lung" lately when I ride. I've been trying to take it easy and take frequent breaks if I feel I need to.

Yesterday it snowed. My car's battery died, so I decided to take the bike tonight to dinner instead of having to walk. The restaurant isn't that far, and the sidewalks were pretty clear except in a couple spots. When I came back home, though, it started to sleeting.

Probably the biggest problem was that I tracked in the snow and slush stuck to the tires in. I laid down a towel and made sure to clean up the puddle of melted ice.
fullergarrett is online now  
Old 02-16-19, 08:24 PM
  #40  
daoswald
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Salt Lake City, UT (Formerly Los Angeles, CA)
Posts: 1,025

Bikes: 2008 Cannondale Synapse -- 2014 Cannondale Quick CX

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 175 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 26 Times in 14 Posts
Originally Posted by fullergarrett View Post
I haven't noticed the "rubber lung" lately when I ride. I've been trying to take it easy and take frequent breaks if I feel I need to.

Yesterday it snowed. My car's battery died, so I decided to take the bike tonight to dinner instead of having to walk. The restaurant isn't that far, and the sidewalks were pretty clear except in a couple spots. When I came back home, though, it started to sleeting.

Probably the biggest problem was that I tracked in the snow and slush stuck to the tires in. I laid down a towel and made sure to clean up the puddle of melted ice.
Just needs fenders and proper lights and it will be an excellent all weather commuter. Oh, and grippier pedals.
daoswald is offline  
Old 02-16-19, 08:34 PM
  #41  
fullergarrett
"Broke College Student"
Thread Starter
 
fullergarrett's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Mid-Missouri, USA
Posts: 87

Bikes: 2016 Giant Sedona, 1987 Free Spirit Pinnacle

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 68 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by daoswald View Post
Just needs fenders and proper lights and it will be an excellent all weather commuter. Oh, and grippier pedals.
+1

I think I should also purchase a rubber mat for storing my bike after I get in from wet/slushy weather. Right now it's sitting on a towel, with the front tire resting on a rag.
fullergarrett is online now  
Old 02-16-19, 08:40 PM
  #42  
daoswald
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Salt Lake City, UT (Formerly Los Angeles, CA)
Posts: 1,025

Bikes: 2008 Cannondale Synapse -- 2014 Cannondale Quick CX

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 175 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 26 Times in 14 Posts
Originally Posted by fullergarrett View Post
+1

I think I should also purchase a rubber mat for storing my bike after I get in from wet/slushy weather. Right now it's sitting on a towel, with the front tire resting on a rag.
Yep, you don't necessarily want to go with slicks because of the snow (I do have slicks on mine, but I drive when there is snow and ice on the roads).

For lights, a good rear flasher, a good rechargeable front-facing headlamp on the handlebar, and possible a CatEye Bottle Blinkey (I like the added visibility mine provides for other drivers). The Bottle Blinkey is not expensive, and it blinks an amber light to the sides to help avoid getting side-smashed by someone running a stop sign or pulling out of a driveway.

I think the rear flasher is every bit as important as a good headlight. Maybe even more-so. Keeping a reflector isn't a bad idea either, but some rear flashers will also serve as reflectors. I have a CygoLite HotShot Pro 150 on one bike, and a CygoLite HotShot Pro 100 on my other bike.
daoswald is offline  
Old 02-16-19, 08:48 PM
  #43  
fullergarrett
"Broke College Student"
Thread Starter
 
fullergarrett's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Mid-Missouri, USA
Posts: 87

Bikes: 2016 Giant Sedona, 1987 Free Spirit Pinnacle

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 68 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by daoswald View Post
Yep, you don't necessarily want to go with slicks because of the snow (I do have slicks on mine, but I drive when there is snow and ice on the roads).

For lights, a good rear flasher, a good rechargeable front-facing headlamp on the handlebar, and possible a CatEye Bottle Blinkey (I like the added visibility mine provides for other drivers). The Bottle Blinkey is not expensive, and it blinks an amber light to the sides to help avoid getting side-smashed by someone running a stop sign or pulling out of a driveway.

I think the rear flasher is every bit as important as a good headlight. Maybe even more-so. Keeping a reflector isn't a bad idea either, but some rear flashers will also serve as reflectors. I have a CygoLite HotShot Pro 150 on one bike, and a CygoLite HotShot Pro 100 on my other bike.
I actually have a rear flasher and a headlight. They're both visible in the images. I picked the pair ("Bell Lumina") up for $20 from my local Wally-Mart. The headlight is a two-brightness setting, with 70 lumens on the low setting, 150 on the high. The taillight only puts out 10 lumens. The pair works fairly well for what I do right now. I try to stay off the streets after the sun goes down, and I travel on the sidewalks through our campus. (Which is much safer, albeit frowned upon.) If I was riding on the streets, I'd probably get another taillight and maybe - over time - invest in a better pair of lights.

As for tires, I think the ones on there worked fairly decent tonight. The stock tires on that bike are actually pretty nice, and seem to get good traction. But there was no ice, and I did start to lose traction in the parts of the sidewalk that weren't cleared as well. If I was riding more regularly on ice or snow, or were riding on the streets, I'd probably invest in studded tires (or make my own out of low-end tires and some screws.)
fullergarrett is online now  
Old 02-16-19, 11:46 PM
  #44  
daoswald
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Salt Lake City, UT (Formerly Los Angeles, CA)
Posts: 1,025

Bikes: 2008 Cannondale Synapse -- 2014 Cannondale Quick CX

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 175 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 26 Times in 14 Posts
Originally Posted by fullergarrett View Post
I actually have a rear flasher and a headlight. They're both visible in the images. I picked the pair ("Bell Lumina") up for $20 from my local Wally-Mart. The headlight is a two-brightness setting, with 70 lumens on the low setting, 150 on the high. The taillight only puts out 10 lumens. The pair works fairly well for what I do right now. I try to stay off the streets after the sun goes down, and I travel on the sidewalks through our campus. (Which is much safer, albeit frowned upon.) If I was riding on the streets, I'd probably get another taillight and maybe - over time - invest in a better pair of lights.

As for tires, I think the ones on there worked fairly decent tonight. The stock tires on that bike are actually pretty nice, and seem to get good traction. But there was no ice, and I did start to lose traction in the parts of the sidewalk that weren't cleared as well. If I was riding more regularly on ice or snow, or were riding on the streets, I'd probably invest in studded tires (or make my own out of low-end tires and some screws.)
Those seem to be fine tires for weather. I wouldn't change them.
daoswald is offline  
Old 02-16-19, 11:53 PM
  #45  
fullergarrett
"Broke College Student"
Thread Starter
 
fullergarrett's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Mid-Missouri, USA
Posts: 87

Bikes: 2016 Giant Sedona, 1987 Free Spirit Pinnacle

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 68 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I will probably be changing the lights to a better set when their straps wear out and they become a fancy flashlight.

Until then, I think they'll do the job. They seem to do a pretty decent job lighting up the area in front of me, and both lights are fairly bright and visible. I've also been thinking about purchasing a second taillight to place on the other side of my basket. (Right now, I only have one mounted to the left half.)
fullergarrett is online now  
Old 02-18-19, 11:46 PM
  #46  
sonali31
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
What are the advantages of the winter cycling ?
sonali31 is offline  
Old 02-19-19, 10:01 PM
  #47  
Homebrew01
Super Moderator
 
Homebrew01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Ffld Cnty Connecticut
Posts: 21,055

Bikes: Old Steelies I made, Old Cannondales

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 797 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 30 Times in 22 Posts
Originally Posted by sonali31 View Post
What are the advantages of the winter cycling ?
Maintaining fitness.
__________________
Bikes: Old steel race bikes, old Cannondale race bikes, less old Cannondale race bike, crappy old mtn bike.

FYI: http://www.bikeforums.net/forum-sugg...ad-please.html
Homebrew01 is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
gavtatu
Recumbent
3
01-29-12 01:32 PM
justride-free
Charity Events
0
03-04-10 04:41 AM
Diode100
Folding Bikes
0
02-18-10 02:39 AM
MCMVIIX
Introductions
2
07-14-04 10:43 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.