Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Questions for those who tour on vintage bikes

Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Questions for those who tour on vintage bikes

Old 06-11-19, 07:11 PM
  #51  
Cycle Tourist
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 239
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 66 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by sloar View Post
Looking at my bike, what would you change to have a worry free high mileage tourer? I知 waiting for FedEx for my fenders, and I知 collecting racks and bags, but as far as mechanical what would you change? The stem look is new to me I知 usually looks before fit, but I知 planning long hours on this and I want it to be comfy.











Looks pretty good to me. Extra spokes! Usually you can feed them through the freewheel and straighten em out. Bring a freewheel tool anyway. You can always find a wrench somewhere. I really prefer barend shifters. The friction ones work fine especially with only 5 gears. The granny looks small enough.. 24t?? A 24 granny with a 32 freewheel will get you anywhere. Straight gauge tubing is the way to go. Add low riders and a removable handle bar bag and your good to go. Fenders are OK but not really needed. (my opinion only). Have fun!!
Cycle Tourist is online now  
Old 06-17-19, 10:25 AM
  #52  
clasher
Senior Member
 
clasher's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Kitchener, ON
Posts: 2,394
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 153 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I managed to bend the axle on the sansin hub that was on my miyata 1000. I've never bent a freehub axle before... but I also don't know how long the wheel was like that and only noticed when I was changing the bearings and couldn't get the QR skewer out. If you ever build new wheels I'd go to a cassette hub.
clasher is offline  
Old 06-17-19, 12:19 PM
  #53  
vascoboy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 103
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I liked my Paselas too...i'd be curious to know too...
vascoboy is offline  
Old 06-17-19, 12:25 PM
  #54  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 41,398

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 188 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6839 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 217 Times in 180 Posts
Originally Posted by sloar View Post
Looking at my bike, what would you change to have a worry free high mileage tourer? I知 waiting for FedEx for my fenders, and I知 collecting racks and bags, but as far as mechanical what would you change? The stem look is new to me I知 usually looks before fit, but I知 planning long hours on this and I want it to be comfy.
It was not that old when I got it in the mid 80's..
I built my own new wheels .. found a 48 hole Phil hubshell for freewheels , built a 40 spoke front from a specialized hub.

found a close out on Campagnolo vacating the MTB sector derailleurs Euclid a beefed version of XT ..

Brakes got some Self energizing cantilevers front and rear Racks from Bruce Gordon (died a few weeks ago)

saddle was a Brooks team pro I had owned and used for 10 years before..





...
fietsbob is offline  
Old 06-17-19, 12:38 PM
  #55  
Salamandrine 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 4,893

Bikes: 78 Masi Criterium, 68 PX10, 2016 Mercian King of Mercia, Rivendell Clem Smith Jr

Mentioned: 106 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1718 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 37 Times in 25 Posts
RE everyone saying you must have barcons:

I say keep the symmetric shifters. Saves the hassle of trimming your front derailleur. They really do work. I may be an oddball but I prefer DT on touring bikes. I tend to hit barcons with my knees. It's nice to get out of the saddle every now and again, if only to relieve the rear end during long days in the saddle. Never had a problem reaching for a DT shifter with bags. A loaded bike tends to want to go in a straight line.
Salamandrine is offline  
Old 06-17-19, 01:01 PM
  #56  
USAZorro
Seor Member
 
USAZorro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Florence, KY
Posts: 16,213

Bikes: Mostly English - predominantly Raleighs

Mentioned: 48 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 695 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 9 Posts
Originally Posted by Salamandrine View Post
RE everyone saying you must have barcons:

I say keep the symmetric shifters. Saves the hassle of trimming your front derailleur. They really do work. I may be an oddball but I prefer DT on touring bikes. I tend to hit barcons with my knees. It's nice to get out of the saddle every now and again, if only to relieve the rear end during long days in the saddle. Never had a problem reaching for a DT shifter with bags. A loaded bike tends to want to go in a straight line.
I guess I could see that if you have long legs, a short torso and a top tube to match. That said, if I were able to position everything so that I could "comfortably" use dt shifters, I'd be cramped up and more likely to bang knees on bar end levers. An individual preference for certain, but randonneur bars set level (or a touch higher) than the saddle will probably eliminate knee banging. That set up definitely reduces arm/shoulder/neck stress for me.
__________________
In search of what to search for.
USAZorro is offline  
Old 06-17-19, 02:26 PM
  #57  
Salamandrine 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 4,893

Bikes: 78 Masi Criterium, 68 PX10, 2016 Mercian King of Mercia, Rivendell Clem Smith Jr

Mentioned: 106 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1718 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 37 Times in 25 Posts
Originally Posted by USAZorro View Post
I guess I could see that if you have long legs, a short torso and a top tube to match. That said, if I were able to position everything so that I could "comfortably" use dt shifters, I'd be cramped up and more likely to bang knees on bar end levers. An individual preference for certain, but randonneur bars set level (or a touch higher) than the saddle will probably eliminate knee banging. That set up definitely reduces arm/shoulder/neck stress for me.
For certain, it's an individual preference thing. No right or wrong here.

Yeah I do have long legs. Top tube is medium. I might try barcons again sometime with randonneur bars, as you say. I am uncomfortable with bars level or higher than the saddle. Bars are maybe 2" drop. Part of the issue no doubt, but it works for me. I don't really get arm/shoulder/neck stress - lucky I know. If anything hurts, it's usually feet/ hands/butt.

I have barcons on my Clem, but they are on Albatross bars which are like 55cm wide or something. No knee issues. They are nice for riding loose dirt.
Salamandrine is offline  
Old 06-18-19, 08:18 AM
  #58  
bwilli88 
Senior Member
 
bwilli88's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Kampong Cham, Cambodia but I have quite a few in Lancaster, PA
Posts: 1,774

Bikes: Bikes in USA; 73 Raleigh Supercourse dingle speed, 74 Raleigh Grand Prix SS, 78 Raleigh Supercourse, 83 Centurion Pro-Tour, 82 Raleigh RRA.

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 421 Post(s)
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
Originally Posted by Cycle Tourist View Post
Straight gauge tubing is the way to go.
That is not Straight gauge tubing, it is Tange Champion #2 which is double butted.
__________________
My Cambodia bikes; ?? Zunow, 81 Centurion Pro Tour, 85 Gazelle Mens Market bike, ?? Maxwell Allroad, 12 Fuji Stratos.
bwilli88 is offline  
Old 06-18-19, 06:46 PM
  #59  
gugie 
Crapmaster Emeritus
 
gugie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 7,360

Bikes: JP Weigle'd Raleigh Competition reconstruct, 73 Raleigh Competition 650b'ed, 96 Bike Friday NWT, 83 Lotus Classique, 78 Centurion ProTour, 73 Raleigh Grand Sports

Mentioned: 777 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2219 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 47 Times in 35 Posts
Originally Posted by Cycle Tourist View Post
Straight gauge tubing is the way to go.
Given the choice, I'd chose DB tubing every day of the week, and twice on Sundays.

The only advantage straight gauge tubing has is cost.
__________________
If someone tells you that you have enough bicycles and you don't need any more, stop talking to them. You don't need that kind of negativity in your life.
gugie is offline  
Old 06-19-19, 12:25 AM
  #60  
Cycle Tourist
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 239
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 66 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by gugie View Post
Given the choice, I'd chose DB tubing every day of the week, and twice on Sundays.

The only advantage straight gauge tubing has is cost.
For me as a touring cyclists carrying 50 lbs of "luggage" and 200 lbs of me I preferred straight gauge tubing on my steel haulers. The extra weight doesn't matter, the tubes are more resistant to dents and I appreciate the extra stiffness.
My most miserable tour was on a triple butted Trek 720 in the biggest frame size. It was way too flexible. I realize my needs are quite specific so generally I'd agree with you but for me, stiffness is King. It probably explains the two Cannondales and the Klein I currently own.😁
Cycle Tourist is online now  
Old 06-19-19, 12:38 AM
  #61  
Cycle Tourist
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 239
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 66 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by yukiinu View Post
Install new bottom bracket. Change triple crankset to 22/32/44. Change freewheel to 7 speed with large 34 tooth low gear. Install long throw rear derailleur for use with 22/34 lowest gear combination. Install 7 speed stem mounted gear shift levers, new chain, front dreauiler (all drive train Shimano) info and purchase at Amazon. Install high pressure presta valve tubes (use schrader to presta rim adapters) use wide touring tires compatible with high pressure tubes. Carry extra tubes/ tires because they are hard to find in small towns (without bike shops). Unlike mountain bike tires tubes which are in drugstores in small towns. I have 9000 miles American cross country touring on road and mountain bikes.
Wow. A 22 granny and a 34 combo should allow easy climbing in any situations you find. I like the way you think although my 24 was the smallest granny I could get on my vintage Sugino and a 32 was the biggest freewheel set I could find at my price point (free). I never needed anything lower, YET.
Cycle Tourist is online now  
Old 06-19-19, 08:22 AM
  #62  
gugie 
Crapmaster Emeritus
 
gugie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 7,360

Bikes: JP Weigle'd Raleigh Competition reconstruct, 73 Raleigh Competition 650b'ed, 96 Bike Friday NWT, 83 Lotus Classique, 78 Centurion ProTour, 73 Raleigh Grand Sports

Mentioned: 777 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2219 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 47 Times in 35 Posts
Originally Posted by Cycle Tourist View Post
For me as a touring cyclists carrying 50 lbs of "luggage" and 200 lbs of me I preferred straight gauge tubing on my steel haulers. The extra weight doesn't matter, the tubes are more resistant to dents and I appreciate the extra stiffness.
My most miserable tour was on a triple butted Trek 720 in the biggest frame size. It was way too flexible. I realize my needs are quite specific so generally I'd agree with you but for me, stiffness is King. It probably explains the two Cannondales and the Klein I currently own.😁
If you put most of your load on the back end, then yes, you need a very stiff frame to counteract the "tail wagging the dog" effect. This makes for a sluggish ride.

If one were to front load the bike, then you don't need a super stiff frame. Loaded like the picture below, I can stand and climb just as easily loaded as unloaded - which is difficult to do when you have a lot of weight on the back end!

__________________
If someone tells you that you have enough bicycles and you don't need any more, stop talking to them. You don't need that kind of negativity in your life.
gugie is offline  
Old 06-19-19, 01:07 PM
  #63  
Cycle Tourist
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 239
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 66 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by gugie View Post
If you put most of your load on the back end, then yes, you need a very stiff frame to counteract the "tail wagging the dog" effect. This makes for a sluggish ride.

If one were to front load the bike, then you don't need a super stiff frame. Loaded like the picture below, I can stand and climb just as easily loaded as unloaded - which is difficult to do when you have a lot of weight on the back end!

I balance my bike very evenly. The triple butted was a nightmare. The entery level straight gauge frame with the proper gearing I had just before that was a joy at all times. I haven't ridden a double butted frame so maybe I'm wrong in loving stiff frames for loaded touring but since most of the compliance comes from the tires I don't see any benefit in adding unnecessary flexibility. Other than a recummbant which was both the best and the worst experience in distance touring, the very expensive, (at the time), 720 really put me off any compliance in conventional frames. It could be I'm stubbornly committed to my way of thinking and my re-worked Klein Performance bike. I'm delighted your happy with your choice of frames and your bike looks like it has tons of personality. Hope I see you on the highway some day.👍
Cycle Tourist is online now  
Old 06-19-19, 07:49 PM
  #64  
The Golden Boy 
Extraordinary Magnitude
 
The Golden Boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Waukesha WI
Posts: 11,367

Bikes: 1977 Trek TX700; 1978/79 Trek 736; 1984 Specialized Stumpjumper Sport; 1984 Schwinn Voyageur SP; 1985 Trek 620; 1985 Trek 720; 1986 Trek 400 Elance; 1987 Schwinn High Sierra; 1990 Miyata 1000LT

Mentioned: 71 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1713 Post(s)
Liked 46 Times in 36 Posts
Originally Posted by Cycle Tourist View Post
I balance my bike very evenly. The triple butted was a nightmare. The entery level straight gauge frame with the proper gearing I had just before that was a joy at all times. I haven't ridden a double butted frame so maybe I'm wrong in loving stiff frames for loaded touring but since most of the compliance comes from the tires I don't see any benefit in adding unnecessary flexibility. Other than a re***mbant which was both the best and the worst experience in distance touring, the very expensive, (at the time), 720 really put me off any compliance in conventional frames. It could be I'm stubbornly committed to my way of thinking and my re-worked Klein Performance bike. I'm delighted your happy with your choice of frames and your bike looks like it has tons of personality. Hope I see you on the highway some day.👍
I don't think you're wrong at all- in fact- if the market is any indicator (which it usually isn't), stiff bikes have won out over compliant bikes especially as far as tourers go. Even by 1990, my Miyata 1000LT is much more stiff with Splined Triple Butted tubing- which is nothing like the 531C double butted tubing (the 720 tourer never came with triple butted tubing).

I haven't hauled the loads you have- and I'm somewhat smaller- but I can totally see where the long rear end Trek geometry combined with lightweight, compliant tubing could be a nightmare. And I do think my Miyata would be a better heavy load hauler- but I do think my Treks have a wonderful unloaded and lightly loaded ride.
__________________
*Recipient of the 2006 Time Magazine "Person Of The Year" Award*

Commence to jigglin huh?!?!

"But hey, always love to hear from opinionated amateurs." -says some guy to Mr. Marshall.
The Golden Boy is offline  
Old 06-19-19, 08:16 PM
  #65  
BikeWonder
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: Calgary
Posts: 145
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 65 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 12 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by The Golden Boy View Post
I don't think you're wrong at all- in fact- if the market is any indicator (which it usually isn't), stiff bikes have won out over compliant bikes especially as far as tourers go. Even by 1990, my Miyata 1000LT is much more stiff with Splined Triple Butted tubing- which is nothing like the 531C double butted tubing (the 720 tourer never came with triple butted tubing).

I haven't hauled the loads you have- and I'm somewhat smaller- but I can totally see where the long rear end Trek geometry combined with lightweight, compliant tubing could be a nightmare. And I do think my Miyata would be a better heavy load hauler- but I do think my Treks have a wonderful unloaded and lightly loaded ride.
I'm about to embark on a trip to Vancouver when the weather gets better. I'll be taking the '91 LT with 40lb rear load. I'll let you know if it feels whippy or not. I've taken it on a few test runs and it seems a lot more stiff than my '82. But a full tour will bring the best of the bike out.



P.s, pix.
BikeWonder is offline  
Old 06-19-19, 08:21 PM
  #66  
-holiday76
No one cares
 
-holiday76's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Yardley, Pa
Posts: 6,076
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 197 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 11 Posts
is this about a fully loaded tour or does any type of tour where bike is main transportation work?

i just did a few days on my '78 Jack Taylor beater.



wait, was there a question?
__________________
I prefer emails to private messages - holiday76@gmail.com
Jack Taylor Super Tourer Tandem (FOR SALE), Jack Taylor Tour of Britain, Px-10, Carlton Flyer, Fuji The Finest, Litespeed Classic, Salsa Fargo, Santa Cruz Tallboy, Riv Betty Foy (wife's), Gitane 500A Mini Racer (FOR SALE), .

-holiday76 is offline  
Old 06-19-19, 08:21 PM
  #67  
The Golden Boy 
Extraordinary Magnitude
 
The Golden Boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Waukesha WI
Posts: 11,367

Bikes: 1977 Trek TX700; 1978/79 Trek 736; 1984 Specialized Stumpjumper Sport; 1984 Schwinn Voyageur SP; 1985 Trek 620; 1985 Trek 720; 1986 Trek 400 Elance; 1987 Schwinn High Sierra; 1990 Miyata 1000LT

Mentioned: 71 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1713 Post(s)
Liked 46 Times in 36 Posts
Originally Posted by BikeWonder View Post
I'm about to embark on a trip to Vancouver when the weather gets better. I'll be taking the '91 LT with 40lb rear load. I'll let you know if it feels whippy or not. I've taken it on a few test runs and it seems a lot more stiff than my '82. But a full tour will bring the best of the bike out.



P.s, pix.
It absolutely feels more stiff than any aluminum or non OS steel bike- the splined tubing does that.
__________________
*Recipient of the 2006 Time Magazine "Person Of The Year" Award*

Commence to jigglin huh?!?!

"But hey, always love to hear from opinionated amateurs." -says some guy to Mr. Marshall.
The Golden Boy is offline  
Old 06-19-19, 11:08 PM
  #68  
gugie 
Crapmaster Emeritus
 
gugie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 7,360

Bikes: JP Weigle'd Raleigh Competition reconstruct, 73 Raleigh Competition 650b'ed, 96 Bike Friday NWT, 83 Lotus Classique, 78 Centurion ProTour, 73 Raleigh Grand Sports

Mentioned: 777 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2219 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 47 Times in 35 Posts
Originally Posted by Cycle Tourist View Post
I balance my bike very evenly. The triple butted was a nightmare. The entery level straight gauge frame with the proper gearing I had just before that was a joy at all times. I haven't ridden a double butted frame so maybe I'm wrong in loving stiff frames for loaded touring but since most of the compliance comes from the tires I don't see any benefit in adding unnecessary flexibility. Other than a recummbant which was both the best and the worst experience in distance touring, the very expensive, (at the time), 720 really put me off any compliance in conventional frames. It could be I'm stubbornly committed to my way of thinking and my re-worked Klein Performance bike. I'm delighted your happy with your choice of frames and your bike looks like it has tons of personality. Hope I see you on the highway some day.👍
I don't balance evenly, almost all of what I carry goes up front. I can get by with 30-35 pounds for camping with sleeping bag, tent, stove, and the rest of my kit. Much more than that and some of the gear starts going to the back. Once you get more weight in the back, then yeah, you need to stiffen up the frame, and a Cannondale/Klein/LHT makes sense.

Triple/double butted tubing is really the same thing, just different thicknesses of butts on either end. Tire compliance is one thing, frame compliance another. A stiff frame feels dead to me - maybe it's just a personal/riding style thing.

Regardless, once you're on the road, it really doesn't matter, does it? I'd ride with you anytime!
__________________
If someone tells you that you have enough bicycles and you don't need any more, stop talking to them. You don't need that kind of negativity in your life.
gugie is offline  
Old 06-20-19, 06:53 AM
  #69  
52telecaster
ambulatory senior
 
52telecaster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Peoria Il
Posts: 2,642

Bikes: Bob Jackson World Tour, 81 miyata 912 and 86 miyata 312.

Mentioned: 35 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 818 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 22 Times in 11 Posts
I love the reasonable discourse on the vintage forum!
52telecaster is offline  
Old 06-20-19, 10:28 AM
  #70  
crank_addict
Senior Member
 
crank_addict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 6,421
Mentioned: 80 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1064 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 18 Times in 13 Posts
Earlier I suggested to utilize the fork and mid braze-ons for low rider panniers but wouldn't make it the rule.

One really needs to experiment, depends on the planned excursion (majority of terrain type and realistic carrying weight). The fork is a suspension, so when one makes truss supports and fuss with various rack mounts, you might be surprised and become sensitive to differences.

If your carrying the wife's extras, kitchen sink and neccitates the rear cargo, no way am I riding the compliant steel.

Although I enjoy a nicely setup '87 Trek 520 (extensively changed from factory equipped) with fork mid-mount, its not even close to what my 20+ yr old ally Cannondale offers. My first loaded trip on the legendary 520 with a standard front rack was a handful, especially on steep fast descents. Its now improved with a mid-fork mount rack but still a noodle.

Learned by lucky chance but acquired this ultra budget 'hybrid' ..... yes, a hybrid flat bar with Marzocchi guts Headshock fork. Swapped to shortened stem, drop bar and dual controls, front pannier rack easily mounted to the suspension fork, meaty fast and reasonably supple 700c x 42 Continental Speedride tires.

(By the way, 27 inch rubber is NO longer common available or are very limited. Every bike shop to Wal-Mart stock 700c tires. Also suggest to predrill rims for Schrader valve.)

This bike is an ugly beast, heavy handling slow feel but it just 'plows' over the worst of roads and ultra plush- it makes touring a joy. I'm
stoked how awesome these Cannondale hybrids can be.


crank_addict is offline  
Old 06-20-19, 04:40 PM
  #71  
The Golden Boy 
Extraordinary Magnitude
 
The Golden Boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Waukesha WI
Posts: 11,367

Bikes: 1977 Trek TX700; 1978/79 Trek 736; 1984 Specialized Stumpjumper Sport; 1984 Schwinn Voyageur SP; 1985 Trek 620; 1985 Trek 720; 1986 Trek 400 Elance; 1987 Schwinn High Sierra; 1990 Miyata 1000LT

Mentioned: 71 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1713 Post(s)
Liked 46 Times in 36 Posts
Originally Posted by crank_addict View Post
Earlier I suggested to utilize the fork and mid braze-ons for low rider panniers but wouldn't make it the rule.

One really needs to experiment, depends on the planned excursion (majority of terrain type and realistic carrying weight). The fork is a suspension, so when one makes truss supports and fuss with various rack mounts, you might be surprised and become sensitive to differences.

If your carrying the wife's extras, kitchen sink and neccitates the rear cargo, no way am I riding the compliant steel.

Although I enjoy a nicely setup '87 Trek 520 (extensively changed from factory equipped) with fork mid-mount, its not even close to what my 20+ yr old ally Cannondale offers. My first loaded trip on the legendary 520 with a standard front rack was a handful, especially on steep fast descents. Its now improved with a mid-fork mount rack but still a noodle.

Learned by lucky chance but acquired this ultra budget 'hybrid' ..... yes, a hybrid flat bar with Marzocchi guts Headshock fork. Swapped to shortened stem, drop bar and dual controls, front pannier rack easily mounted to the suspension fork, meaty fast and reasonably supple 700c x 42 Continental Speedride tires.

(By the way, 27 inch rubber is NO longer common available or are very limited. Every bike shop to Wal-Mart stock 700c tires. Also suggest to predrill rims for Schrader valve.)

This bike is an ugly beast, heavy handling slow feel but it just 'plows' over the worst of roads and ultra plush- it makes touring a joy. I'm
stoked how awesome these Cannondale hybrids can be.


Man, you manage to hit a lot of trees. I can't even think of the last time I knocked over a tree on my bike...

I find your comments about the 520 to be interesting- as that's the 531 main frame with CrMo stays and fork, correct? Theoretically, naturally stiffer than an all 531 bike- and with not having 47cm chainstays- much less back there for rear leverage. Up until I acquired my Miyata- my 86 Trek 400 Elance was my stiffest "road" frame- 531/CrMo and (I think) 42.5cm chainstays.

That being said, the Miyata 1000LT with the 45cm chainstays and the Splined Triple Butted tubing give the stiffest ride- of my bikes. Cannondales have that reputation of being ultra stiff- and although I don't have one- and can't say I've ridden one- I can surmise what that stiffness must be like in regards to the difference of my long chain stayed 531 Treks and the the Miyata.
__________________
*Recipient of the 2006 Time Magazine "Person Of The Year" Award*

Commence to jigglin huh?!?!

"But hey, always love to hear from opinionated amateurs." -says some guy to Mr. Marshall.
The Golden Boy is offline  
Old 06-20-19, 04:53 PM
  #72  
The Golden Boy 
Extraordinary Magnitude
 
The Golden Boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Waukesha WI
Posts: 11,367

Bikes: 1977 Trek TX700; 1978/79 Trek 736; 1984 Specialized Stumpjumper Sport; 1984 Schwinn Voyageur SP; 1985 Trek 620; 1985 Trek 720; 1986 Trek 400 Elance; 1987 Schwinn High Sierra; 1990 Miyata 1000LT

Mentioned: 71 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1713 Post(s)
Liked 46 Times in 36 Posts
Originally Posted by gugie View Post
A stiff frame feels dead to me - maybe it's just a personal/riding style thing.
I'd guess it's sort of like how some people refer to some bikes as "noodle-y" and some refer to the same bikes as "compliant." Some pleasingly refer to their bikes as "stiff" while others refer to this same bikes as "rattle your teeth out stiff."
__________________
*Recipient of the 2006 Time Magazine "Person Of The Year" Award*

Commence to jigglin huh?!?!

"But hey, always love to hear from opinionated amateurs." -says some guy to Mr. Marshall.
The Golden Boy is offline  
Old 06-21-19, 01:10 AM
  #73  
Bad Lag
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: So Cal, for now
Posts: 1,002

Bikes: 1975 Bob Jackson - Nuovo Record, Brooks Pro, Clips & Straps

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 321 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 16 Times in 13 Posts
My suggestions -

Get some lights for the front and rear.
Get a front rack with a removable bag. (Link to VO web site)
Consider a larger rear sprocket (wider gear range).

When I toured on a bike, it was all too common for me to arrive after dark. You just never know what will happen. Good lights are expensive but they are small, light weight and actually work.

I have one of those stems and think it is fine.

Last edited by Bad Lag; 06-21-19 at 01:22 AM.
Bad Lag is offline  
Old 06-21-19, 06:18 AM
  #74  
The Golden Boy 
Extraordinary Magnitude
 
The Golden Boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Waukesha WI
Posts: 11,367

Bikes: 1977 Trek TX700; 1978/79 Trek 736; 1984 Specialized Stumpjumper Sport; 1984 Schwinn Voyageur SP; 1985 Trek 620; 1985 Trek 720; 1986 Trek 400 Elance; 1987 Schwinn High Sierra; 1990 Miyata 1000LT

Mentioned: 71 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1713 Post(s)
Liked 46 Times in 36 Posts
Originally Posted by -holiday76 View Post
is this about a fully loaded tour or does any type of tour where bike is main transportation work?

i just did a few days on my '78 Jack Taylor beater.



wait, was there a question?
That thing is thrashed.
Was Jack Taylor the previous owner? Is it a Treck? I don稚 see why you壇 want it if it if it wasn稚 a Treck.

釘eater. Right.

That thing is effin glorious- throw some more pix up on the Tourer thread!
__________________
*Recipient of the 2006 Time Magazine "Person Of The Year" Award*

Commence to jigglin huh?!?!

"But hey, always love to hear from opinionated amateurs." -says some guy to Mr. Marshall.
The Golden Boy is offline  
Old 06-23-19, 04:47 AM
  #75  
Phamilton
Gone
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Ft Wayne, IN
Posts: 1,028
Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 355 Post(s)
Liked 16 Times in 13 Posts
My Voyageur has Tange Champion tubing. It痴 the most flexible frame I致e ever ridden/owned, and I like the way it wiggles and squirms unless I have more than about 30 lbs loaded on it, then the handling becomes challenging.
Phamilton is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright ゥ 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.