Cyclocross and Gravelbiking (Recreational) This has to be the most physically intense sport ever invented. It's high speed bicycle racing on a short off road course or riding the off pavement rides on gravel like :The Dirty Kanza". We also have a dedicated Racing forum for the Cyclocross Hard Core Racers.

New model - Trek Checkpoint

Old 03-01-18, 03:30 PM
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New model - Trek Checkpoint

Trek just outted their new line of gravel models, the Checkpoint. Room for 45mm tires, Stranglehold adjustable dropouts (SS anyone?), four sets of bottle bosses and plenty of rack mounts. The carbon models have a rear IsoSpeed decoupler but, curiously, no front Iso. The carbon SL 5 Checkpoint, outfitted with 105 (505 hydro levers), rings in at $2800.



Thoughts? I'm wondering if they're going to bring out a higher-end model (SLR?) with front Iso, because that feels like a strange omission.
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Old 03-01-18, 03:42 PM
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Paint scheme looks like its from a WW2 tank/air plane or something…
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Old 03-01-18, 04:13 PM
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The bike looks cool was all over Twitter today promoting it.....cheap one is under 2K
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Old 03-01-18, 05:13 PM
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Carbon, 105 and 45 mm tires for $2800 list...

I would love this bike if it were not for the decoupler gizmo.


-Tim-
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Old 03-01-18, 05:21 PM
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Originally Posted by TimothyH View Post
Carbon, 105 and 45 mm tires for $2800 list...

I would love this bike if it were not for the decoupler gizmo.


-Tim-
Have you ridden a decoupler gizmo? I think it's pretty awesome and most who've reviewed bikes with them seem to feel the same.
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Old 03-01-18, 05:24 PM
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No direct mount for the RD? Boo.

Like it otherwise... Not sure about those drops holding the wheel when it is aft
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Old 03-01-18, 07:17 PM
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Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
Have you ridden a decoupler gizmo? I think it's pretty awesome and most who've reviewed bikes with them seem to feel the same.
No I haven't ridden it and I could very well be wrong.

Every review I've read of devices which induce flex or impart compliance seem to be negative including some threads here.

Is it really that good? Why not just a solid frame designed properly for the right compliance? I assume Trek could do so given their pedigree and always assumed such devices were just there to dampen roughness from the road and nothing more.

I don't mean to take the thread off on a tangent. If there were a link that could educate me on the specifics of this device and why it is better then I'm all ears.


-Tim-
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Old 03-01-18, 07:51 PM
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Originally Posted by TimothyH View Post
No I haven't ridden it and I could very well be wrong.

Every review I've read of devices which induce flex or impart compliance seem to be negative including some threads here.

Is it really that good? Why not just a solid frame designed properly for the right compliance? I assume Trek could do so given their pedigree and always assumed such devices were just there to dampen roughness from the road and nothing more.

I don't mean to take the thread off on a tangent. If there were a link that could educate me on the specifics of this device and why it is better then I'm all ears.


-Tim-
There are plenty of article readily available via Google. If every review you've read has been negative, you haven't read any on IsoSpeed - they're overwhelmingly positive. The "device" is nothing more than a bearing - no elastomers or anything like that. It allows the entirety of the seatpost/seat tube to flex as one, from BB to saddle, kind of like a sine wave, with the bearing at the null point. In practice, I will say that it might get bouncy with choppy pedaling a little sooner than a more conventional design, but that might be the tires, too (I won't get skinnier tires on it for another month or more). And yes, most seem to concentrate on smoothing out uncomfortable jolts, but I think that's getting the narrative wrong; the biggest difference I've noticed is in handling/road-holding - the bike always feels incredibly planted.
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Old 03-01-18, 11:34 PM
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Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
There are plenty of article readily available via Google. If every review you've read has been negative, you haven't read any on IsoSpeed - they're overwhelmingly positive. The "device" is nothing more than a bearing - no elastomers or anything like that. It allows the entirety of the seatpost/seat tube to flex as one, from BB to saddle, kind of like a sine wave, with the bearing at the null point. In practice, I will say that it might get bouncy with choppy pedaling a little sooner than a more conventional design, but that might be the tires, too (I won't get skinnier tires on it for another month or more). And yes, most seem to concentrate on smoothing out uncomfortable jolts, but I think that's getting the narrative wrong; the biggest difference I've noticed is in handling/road-holding - the bike always feels incredibly planted.
Then I confess ignorance and am grateful for the education.

I was thinking of elastomers and will have to give this another look.


-Tim-
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Old 03-02-18, 12:13 PM
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Originally Posted by TimothyH View Post

I would love this bike if it were not for the decoupler gizmo.


-Tim-
Get the aluminum version then, problem solved!
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Old 03-02-18, 01:23 PM
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I wonder why they bothered with the Domane Gravel models a few months back if this was in the works. It looks like a promising line, I'd like to see a 1X option.
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Old 03-02-18, 01:52 PM
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The carbon 105 model is reported to weigh 21 lbs and the carbon Ultegra model 19 lbs. Does that seem a bit heavy for a carbon gravel bike? By comparison, my aluminum Niner RLT9 Ultegra tips the scales at 21 lbs.
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Old 03-02-18, 01:56 PM
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Originally Posted by jp911 View Post
The carbon 105 model is reported to weigh 21 lbs and the carbon Ultegra model 19 lbs. Does that seem a bit heavy for a carbon gravel bike? By comparison, my aluminum Niner RLT9 Ultegra tips the scales at 21 lbs.
It is hard to make CF components lightweight (like on a road bike) while still meeting the minimum structure for CX type workloads.

For reference the Niner full-carbon road/CX fork weighs in at around 600grams. Which is needed because it is rated for Condition 2 riding AKA 6" drops or less. Do that on a lightweight road fork (with half as much mass) and it would break sooner rather than later.
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Old 03-02-18, 02:36 PM
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Originally Posted by jp911 View Post
The carbon 105 model is reported to weigh 21 lbs and the carbon Ultegra model 19 lbs. Does that seem a bit heavy for a carbon gravel bike? By comparison, my aluminum Niner RLT9 Ultegra tips the scales at 21 lbs.
With 40s? I don't think it seems that heavy.
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Old 03-02-18, 02:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Ghazmh View Post
I wonder why they bothered with the Domane Gravel models a few months back if this was in the works.
Me neither, but I'm glad they did. This looks interesting, but I'm happy with the Domane - only 35s, but with better levers and calipers and Iso front and back for $300 less makes it a compelling value in an all-arounder (that I got mine at a $500 discount on top of that makes it even betterer).
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Old 03-02-18, 02:55 PM
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I was considering a Domane Gravel or a Diverge before I decided to go with a cross bike. Sounds like it was a good buy for you. I didnt catch the front Isozone difference. If the Passport was out in January I may have considered it but what ultimately drove me to a cross bike was the 1X, light weight, and the price. I got a Boon 7 for $2000.00.
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Old 03-02-18, 03:14 PM
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That's a good deal, too!
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Old 03-02-18, 03:44 PM
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I saw this bike at the LBS today with 700 x 50 tires front and back with room to spare.


The rear dropout slider was interesting.


Also, the FD is redesigned to move the cable attachment forward to allow for bigger tires.
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Old 03-02-18, 03:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Planemaker View Post
Also, the FD is redesigned to move the cable attachment forward to allow for bigger tires.
Shimano snuck in that 5801 revision a little while back - my Domane came with one, too. It works well. I'll probably replace the 5800 on my Haanjo with a 5801 (or put an 8000 on the Domane and move the 5801 over) - some 40s come very close to scraping the arm on the Haanjo. Supposedly easier shifts, too, and it covers the wider chainring spacing of the newer groups (just 9100 and 8000 at this point, but it's assumed the others will follow).
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Old 03-02-18, 06:01 PM
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Originally Posted by TimothyH View Post
Carbon, 105 and 45 mm tires for $2800 list...

I would love this bike if it were not for the decoupler gizmo.


-Tim-
The ALR has no decoupler.

Edit: I have a Crossrip and a Domane ALR. Trek is really slicing the market thin here now.
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Old 03-02-18, 06:04 PM
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This frame checks looks like it compares closely with the 3T Exploro which can arguably be considered on the best performance gravel bikes out there. Best of all, it comes in at a much lower price point.

My LBS the sponsoring shop for the Panaracer/Stan's Notubes team and I could see them riding these bikes next year (the frames are comparable and Trek has deeper pockets).
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Old 03-02-18, 07:01 PM
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Originally Posted by jp911 View Post
The carbon 105 model is reported to weigh 21 lbs and the carbon Ultegra model 19 lbs. Does that seem a bit heavy for a carbon gravel bike? By comparison, my aluminum Niner RLT9 Ultegra tips the scales at 21 lbs.
Those weights seem pretty on the money for a burly carbon gravel bike. Jamis advertises their Renegade Elite as 18lbs, but a pound here or there wouldn't be the deciding factor for me. All the gravel riders I've met seem to be Clearance Weenies, not Weight Weenies.
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Old 03-03-18, 06:30 AM
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Originally Posted by birru View Post
Those weights seem pretty on the money for a burly carbon gravel bike. Jamis advertises their Renegade Elite as 18lbs, but a pound here or there wouldn't be the deciding factor for me. All the gravel riders I've met seem to be Clearance Weenies, not Weight Weenies.
Which is why it is surprising Trek didn't go much wider. The bash guard on the carbon models is pretty neat, though.

I still can't stomach the idea of a carbon gravel bike if I'm the one paying for the frame, odd that they didn't put the Iso decoupler in the ALR models - they've put it in an Al bike before.
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Old 03-03-18, 08:53 AM
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Originally Posted by ph0rk View Post
Which is why it is surprising Trek didn't go much wider. The bash guard on the carbon models is pretty neat, though.

I still can't stomach the idea of a carbon gravel bike if I'm the one paying for the frame, odd that they didn't put the Iso decoupler in the ALR models - they've put it in an Al bike before.
Not sure what you mean. I saw one at the LBS mounted with 700 x 50 front and rear with plenty of clearance. I could be wrong but, that has to be in the top tier of all gravel bikes for tire width.

And, you can put 650b on as well
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Old 03-03-18, 12:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Planemaker View Post
Not sure what you mean. I saw one at the LBS mounted with 700 x 50 front and rear with plenty of clearance. I could be wrong but, that has to be in the top tier of all gravel bikes for tire width.

And, you can put 650b on as well
What tire and rim, and how much mud clearance was left? I've mounted 700x50mm Big apples on 17mm rims and they barely measured wider than 45mm. It is hard to tell from this image, but if that is the 35mm g-one, I don't think you can cram that much in there beyond 45mm, like Trek says: https://trek.scene7.com/is/image/Tre...0,0&iccEmbed=0

As for something like the Horizon in 47mm at 650b, it would depend on the shape of the chainstays. Would probably work, but you'd want to check that you had more than a couple mm of clearance or you'll pack mud near the FD eventually.

It looks like they've gone without a chainstay bridge, at least, so the tire height won't be a problem in the back like the Crossrip.

Last edited by ph0rk; 03-03-18 at 12:12 PM.
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