Cyclocross and Gravelbiking (Recreational) This has to be the most physically intense sport ever invented. It's high speed bicycle racing on a short off road course or riding the off pavement rides on gravel like :The Dirty Kanza". We also have a dedicated Racing forum for the Cyclocross Hard Core Racers.

New model - Trek Checkpoint

Old 03-03-18, 12:33 PM
  #26  
Planemaker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Wichita, KS.
Posts: 834
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 149 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by ph0rk View Post
What tire and rim, and how much mud clearance was left? I've mounted 700x50mm Big apples on 17mm rims and they barely measured wider than 45mm. It is hard to tell from this image, but if that is the 35mm g-one, I don't think you can cram that much in there beyond 45mm, like Trek says: https://trek.scene7.com/is/image/Tre...0,0&iccEmbed=0

As for something like the Horizon in 47mm at 650b, it would depend on the shape of the chainstays. Would probably work, but you'd want to check that you had more than a couple mm of clearance or you'll pack mud near the FD eventually.

It looks like they've gone without a chainstay bridge, at least, so the tire height won't be a problem in the back like the Crossrip.
I don't know what tires but, I suspect the stock rims. I will try and post a picture next time I go to the shop.

From what I could tell there was plenty of clearance for the tires especially in the front. I see that Trek specs out 45 wide maximum.
Planemaker is offline  
Old 03-03-18, 03:07 PM
  #27  
mstateglfr 
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 8,272

Bikes: '87 Schwinn Prelude, Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara/Centurion Ironman, '18 Diamondback Syncr, '18 handmade steel roadbike

Mentioned: 76 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2968 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 148 Times in 105 Posts
As with most offerings from Gitrekalized in the last few years, this gets a solid MEH for a reaction.

$2800 for carbon and hydraulic 105? MEH.
Color scheme? MEH.

Just MEH all around.
Im sure its a well designed and fun bike. At that price, it better be.
Just dont see the value compared to a lot of smaller brands.
mstateglfr is offline  
Old 03-03-18, 04:53 PM
  #28  
WhyFi
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
WhyFi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Got a castle in - er, Minneapolis, that's where I dwell!
Posts: 24,862

Bikes: 2016 Diamondback Haanjo, 2018 Trek Domane SL5 Gravel

Mentioned: 298 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8896 Post(s)
Liked 141 Times in 85 Posts
Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
Just dont see the value compared to a lot of smaller brands.
Like what? I'm having a hard time coming up with similarly spec'd gravel/road builds for significantly less, unless you're talking consumer-direct.
WhyFi is offline  
Old 03-03-18, 05:26 PM
  #29  
mstateglfr 
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 8,272

Bikes: '87 Schwinn Prelude, Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara/Centurion Ironman, '18 Diamondback Syncr, '18 handmade steel roadbike

Mentioned: 76 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2968 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 148 Times in 105 Posts
Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
Like what? I'm having a hard time coming up with similarly spec'd gravel/road builds for significantly less, unless you're talking consumer-direct.
Well, online options are certainly legitimate options, so sure they would be inlcluded.
As for specifics, no i dont want to pmay the game of compare the bikes and argue over their differences and why my examples are bad comps.
If that wasnt your intent, cool, still not interested.

I just dont see the value. I am not inspired or moved by that Trek. Part of it is probably that i have low standards and dont care if a frame is carbon, which is where a lot of the markup in this bike is.
Oh, and the totally unknown wheels(based on trek's site) doesnt make me think quality or value. It may be there, but they sure arent saying so.

I do like the red color WAY more than the gray and black.
And the downtube armor is funny, but probably helpful.

A carbon 105 bike for $2800...i guess its the norm for the bike brands.
mstateglfr is offline  
Old 03-03-18, 05:30 PM
  #30  
ph0rk
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Southern Appalachians
Posts: 450

Bikes: A hauler, a commuter, and a steamroller.

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
Like what? I'm having a hard time coming up with similarly spec'd gravel/road builds for significantly less, unless you're talking consumer-direct.
I don't get the comment, either. A warbird carbon Rival is $3300, and a 105 carbon Checkpoint is 2800, though a pound or two heavier.

If the weight difference bothers you, the SL6 weighs about what the warbird does, and has the iso decoupler for $3800.

An Ultegra Warbird is $4300 and weighs about what the SL6 Checkpoint does. This looks like pretty strong pricing to me.

Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
I just dont see the value. I am not inspired or moved by that Trek.
That they finally got off their collective rears and entered the gravel segment for realsies is notable.
ph0rk is offline  
Old 03-03-18, 06:00 PM
  #31  
WhyFi
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
WhyFi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Got a castle in - er, Minneapolis, that's where I dwell!
Posts: 24,862

Bikes: 2016 Diamondback Haanjo, 2018 Trek Domane SL5 Gravel

Mentioned: 298 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8896 Post(s)
Liked 141 Times in 85 Posts
Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
Well, online options are certainly legitimate options, so sure they would be inlcluded.
As for specifics, no i dont want to pmay the game of compare the bikes and argue over their differences and why my examples are bad comps.
If that wasnt your intent, cool, still not interested.

I just dont see the value. I am not inspired or moved by that Trek. Part of it is probably that i have low standards and dont care if a frame is carbon, which is where a lot of the markup in this bike is.
Oh, and the totally unknown wheels(based on trek's site) doesnt make me think quality or value. It may be there, but they sure arent saying so.

I do like the red color WAY more than the gray and black.
And the downtube armor is funny, but probably helpful.

A carbon 105 bike for $2800...i guess its the norm for the bike brands.
No, I was genuinely interested. I've been shopping in the CF, hydro 105 realm for a couple years and, that I've seen, yeah, ~$2500 seems to be the entry point for skinny tires, with gravel commanding an additional premium. Even direct-to-consumer options, like DB or Canyon, are still pushing $2k on their road bikes and a little more for gravel/cx.

Back to the Checkpoint, in particular - clearance for 45 (and maybe more), the dropouts would allow you to run it as a single and/or effectively change your chainstay length, just about anyone that's ridden IsoSpeed thinks it's legit (though I would have liked to have seen it up front, too) and it seems to have a decent amount of flexibility for bikepacking and the like. This in addition to full 105 hydro. That's presenting value in my book. *shrug*
WhyFi is offline  
Old 03-04-18, 06:34 AM
  #32  
thehammerdog
Senior Member
 
thehammerdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: NWNJ
Posts: 2,642

Bikes: Road bike is a Carbon Bianchi C2C & Grandis (1980's), Gary Fisher Mt Bike, Trek Tandem & Mongoose SS MTB circa 1992.

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 211 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Here is a nice review of the bike.
https://www.bikeradar.com/us/road/ne...details-51829/
thehammerdog is offline  
Old 03-04-18, 09:08 PM
  #33  
mstateglfr 
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 8,272

Bikes: '87 Schwinn Prelude, Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara/Centurion Ironman, '18 Diamondback Syncr, '18 handmade steel roadbike

Mentioned: 76 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2968 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 148 Times in 105 Posts
Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
Back to the Checkpoint, in particular - clearance for 45 (and maybe more), the dropouts would allow you to run it as a single and/or effectively change your chainstay length, just about anyone that's ridden IsoSpeed thinks it's legit (though I would have liked to have seen it up front, too) and it seems to have a decent amount of flexibility for bikepacking and the like. This in addition to full 105 hydro. That's presenting value in my book. *shrug*
- Clearance for 45mm tires is incredibly common on gravel bikes and mine can handle up to 50mm. No value there for me.
- like the Checkpoint, I can run my bike as geared or single speed. And i can adjust the wheelbase/chainstay length. Its a $600 frameset with semi horizontal dropouts. No value there for me.
- as for IsoSpeed, ive ridden a road bike with it, though for not even 1 mile. Its good technology to have to justify the bike cost, thats for sure. Trek needs to have something to point to for the price and IsoSpeed is as good as anything for that. I am comfortable on my bike for miles and miles of gravel. I have yet to think i need a damping system beyond the steel frame and C17 saddle. No value there for me. Perhaps in years to come i will find this to be of value.
- the Checkpoint does seem versatile due to the many mounting points. It also appears to have geometry on the more aggressive side vs what i would think of for backpacking. Either way, my $600 frameset has 3 bottle mounts and mounts for front and rear racks No value there for me.
- i dont care about hydraulic brakes since cantilever brakes stop me withput issue or concern every time, regardless of the slope or terrain. No value there for me.
- a carbon frame doesnt get me excited. No value there for me.


Like i mentioned- i have low standards. Canti brakes are plenty for me, even at my weight. My double butted steel frame and C17 saddle provide enough comfort that i dont long for a damping unit. An 11sp mechanical drivetrain works just fine for me too as i dont mind moving a finger when i want to shift...it doesnt seem excessive to me.

I get that the Iso tech and Hydraulic brakes are value to many. And some go so far to even claim such tech is necessary, so they clearly find value in the bike.

Im just surprised it takes spending $2800 to get a carbon bike with a wobbly seatpost and hydraulic brakes in 105 trim.
mstateglfr is offline  
Old 03-04-18, 09:18 PM
  #34  
WhyFi
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
WhyFi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Got a castle in - er, Minneapolis, that's where I dwell!
Posts: 24,862

Bikes: 2016 Diamondback Haanjo, 2018 Trek Domane SL5 Gravel

Mentioned: 298 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8896 Post(s)
Liked 141 Times in 85 Posts
Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
- Clearance for 45mm tires is incredibly common on gravel bikes and mine can handle up to 50mm. No value there for me.
- like the Checkpoint, I can run my bike as geared or single speed. And i can adjust the wheelbase/chainstay length. Its a $600 frameset with semi horizontal dropouts. No value there for me.
- as for IsoSpeed, ive ridden a road bike with it, though for not even 1 mile. Its good technology to have to justify the bike cost, thats for sure. Trek needs to have something to point to for the price and IsoSpeed is as good as anything for that. I am comfortable on my bike for miles and miles of gravel. I have yet to think i need a damping system beyond the steel frame and C17 saddle. No value there for me. Perhaps in years to come i will find this to be of value.
- the Checkpoint does seem versatile due to the many mounting points. It also appears to have geometry on the more aggressive side vs what i would think of for backpacking. Either way, my $600 frameset has 3 bottle mounts and mounts for front and rear racks No value there for me.
- i dont care about hydraulic brakes since cantilever brakes stop me withput issue or concern every time, regardless of the slope or terrain. No value there for me.
- a carbon frame doesnt get me excited. No value there for me.


Like i mentioned- i have low standards. Canti brakes are plenty for me, even at my weight. My double butted steel frame and C17 saddle provide enough comfort that i dont long for a damping unit. An 11sp mechanical drivetrain works just fine for me too as i dont mind moving a finger when i want to shift...it doesnt seem excessive to me.

I get that the Iso tech and Hydraulic brakes are value to many. And some go so far to even claim such tech is necessary, so they clearly find value in the bike.

Im just surprised it takes spending $2800 to get a carbon bike with a wobbly seatpost and hydraulic brakes in 105 trim.
Got it - so your statement was more about you than about the bike. Cool.
WhyFi is offline  
Old 03-05-18, 06:25 AM
  #35  
Hiro11
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 2,054

Bikes: To the right: opinions, not facts.

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 447 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 22 Times in 14 Posts
I have mixed feelings here.

On the upside:
- Trek's carbon manufacturing is second to none these days, I'm sure this is a well made frame.
- This design is versatile and practical.
- I like the simple paint job.

On the downside:
- $2,800 for 105 and house brand everything else is not ridiculous but hardly a bargain.
- Yet another BB90, the worst bottom bracket design ever.
- The design is middle of the road and uninspired. This frame is similar to those offered by any number of other companies.

Ambivalent about:
- IsoSpeed. Seems like a gimmick but maybe it works?
- 2x11 road gearing. I prefer clutched RD 1x designs for this type of bike, but I can see how others would prefer a regular 2x build.
Hiro11 is offline  
Old 03-05-18, 10:51 AM
  #36  
vinuneuro
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: NW Chicagoland
Posts: 737

Bikes: 2016 Diverge Expert

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 362 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
They are late to the game and I don't find much compelling about this this bike, particularly without the front isospeed which seems like a glaring omission considering the intended use and since the Domane SL has it at a similar price point. The rear system is hardly worth it since you can get similar ride comfort with one of the excellent Canyon VCLS seatposts.
vinuneuro is offline  
Old 03-05-18, 02:10 PM
  #37  
Seattle Forrest
Senior Member
 
Seattle Forrest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 19,086
Mentioned: 43 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7992 Post(s)
Liked 195 Times in 128 Posts
Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
Like what? I'm having a hard time coming up with similarly spec'd gravel/road builds for significantly less, unless you're talking consumer-direct.
GT Grade is $1,750 in 105, and full carbon, at Competitive Cyclist. Jenson has it for $2,200 with Ultegra, which is hydraulic (not sure about 105?) and also comes with carbon bars and seatpost. They're a little bit unclear on the clearance but probably 38 or 40 mm.
Seattle Forrest is offline  
Old 03-05-18, 02:18 PM
  #38  
WhyFi
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
WhyFi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Got a castle in - er, Minneapolis, that's where I dwell!
Posts: 24,862

Bikes: 2016 Diamondback Haanjo, 2018 Trek Domane SL5 Gravel

Mentioned: 298 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8896 Post(s)
Liked 141 Times in 85 Posts
Originally Posted by Seattle Forrest View Post
GT Grade is $1,750 in 105, and full carbon, at Competitive Cyclist. Jenson has it for $2,200 with Ultegra, which is hydraulic (not sure about 105?) and also comes with carbon bars and seatpost. They're a little bit unclear on the clearance but probably 38 or 40 mm.
Yeah, those are close-out prices - they were under consideration before purchasing the Domane (if not for the fugly colorway, I might have bought one of them). Regular price reinforces the ~$2500 price point, though and FWIW, I've also never seen a GT at an LBS.
WhyFi is offline  
Old 03-05-18, 02:26 PM
  #39  
Seattle Forrest
Senior Member
 
Seattle Forrest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 19,086
Mentioned: 43 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7992 Post(s)
Liked 195 Times in 128 Posts
I think you're right about closeout prices. I mean they're what's turning up right now when I google it, but it's early March.

The Trek is probably the better frame. I say that having bought a Grade.
Seattle Forrest is offline  
Old 03-05-18, 05:30 PM
  #40  
ph0rk
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Southern Appalachians
Posts: 450

Bikes: A hauler, a commuter, and a steamroller.

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by vinuneuro View Post
They are late to the game and I don't find much compelling about this this bike, particularly without the front isospeed which seems like a glaring omission considering the intended use and since the Domane SL has it at a similar price point. The rear system is hardly worth it since you can get similar ride comfort with one of the excellent Canyon VCLS seatposts.
I've ridden Domanes with and without the front isospeed. The rear one makes much much more of a difference (and I bought one with the rear only as a result for me, and one with both for the partner). A gel topper for the bars (like they put on the crossrip) does about as much good on cobbles as the front isospeed; big bumps will jar you either way.

Rough gravel riding with washboards will index a headset pretty fast - I figure that it would trash the elastomer in the isospeed, too.
ph0rk is offline  
Old 03-06-18, 02:55 PM
  #41  
tegnamo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 114
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 27 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by ph0rk View Post
I've ridden Domanes with and without the front isospeed. The rear one makes much much more of a difference (and I bought one with the rear only as a result for me, and one with both for the partner). A gel topper for the bars (like they put on the crossrip) does about as much good on cobbles as the front isospeed; big bumps will jar you either way.

Rough gravel riding with washboards will index a headset pretty fast - I figure that it would trash the elastomer in the isospeed, too.
Front/rear isospeed aren't elastomer-based.

The rear isospeed definitely helps. It basically grants extra compliance without having to risk failing ISO frame tests quite so much.
tegnamo is offline  
Old 03-06-18, 04:22 PM
  #42  
Craptacular8
Senior Member
 
Craptacular8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 503
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 121 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Like the tire clearance, and this is probably just me, but they must be counting on these bikes ending up primarily gravel road race, rather than an emphasis on either the touring/bike packing, or tons of recreational gravel. It looks like Trek took the Boon/Crockett added rack/fender mounts, clearance for wider tires, and put a double on it. I'd initially thought this was aimed at the crowd that might otherwise purchase a Diverge, but perhaps Trek figures they have that covered with the Crossrip/Domane?

I'm sure there are plenty of folks that want a 50/34, or maybe even bigger rings than that on their gravel bikes, but that's a bit high for myself, even with a 11-34 on behind. I think I might be a little more intrigued if it had say a 46/30 in front. We've done somewhat hilly touring with a 50/34 and 11-32 behind, but that's a light load of less than 20lbs including the rack, however I definitely wouldn't want to tackle hilly, bike packing, and gravel with a 50/34. If my lbs of choice was a Trek dealer, and I was looking for a gravel/adventure/all around, I'd probably be more than happy with one of these after swapping out the crankset to something that would work for my ability.

When I perused Trek's road bikes, I guess I'm not seeing a gravel/adventure bike that is actually geared low enough for throwing a load on, outside of their venerable 520/920/1120, the latter 2 being very much mtb oriented.
Craptacular8 is offline  
Old 03-06-18, 04:54 PM
  #43  
Planemaker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Wichita, KS.
Posts: 834
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 149 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 2 Posts
Ok, I'll post pictures later but, the Checkpoint I saw had Clement 700 x 50 on stock wheels. I wouldn't want to run it in muddy conditions but, dry no issues. Plenty of clearance with 700 x 45.
Planemaker is offline  
Old 03-06-18, 07:53 PM
  #44  
Planemaker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Wichita, KS.
Posts: 834
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 149 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 2 Posts
IMG_20180306_163406.jpg

IMG_20180306_163433.jpg

IMG_20180306_163501.jpg

IMG_20180306_163553.jpg
Planemaker is offline  
Old 03-06-18, 08:32 PM
  #45  
mstateglfr 
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 8,272

Bikes: '87 Schwinn Prelude, Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara/Centurion Ironman, '18 Diamondback Syncr, '18 handmade steel roadbike

Mentioned: 76 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2968 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 148 Times in 105 Posts
Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
Got it - so your statement was more about you than about the bike. Cool.
Eh...it was about the bike too.
If a coworker asked about that bike for them, i would probably recommend a dozen other bikes for $500-1000 less that would have 95% of what this Trek has. And that missing 5% wpuld be explained as limited benefit and hardly a need.

Im sure this bike will be great for long competitive races, based on the geometry and marketed benefits.
mstateglfr is offline  
Old 03-06-18, 09:11 PM
  #46  
WhyFi
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
WhyFi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Got a castle in - er, Minneapolis, that's where I dwell!
Posts: 24,862

Bikes: 2016 Diamondback Haanjo, 2018 Trek Domane SL5 Gravel

Mentioned: 298 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8896 Post(s)
Liked 141 Times in 85 Posts
Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
Eh...it was about the bike too.
If a coworker asked about that bike for them, i would probably recommend a dozen other bikes for $500-1000 less that would have 95% of what this Trek has. And that missing 5% wpuld be explained as limited benefit and hardly a need.

Im sure this bike will be great for long competitive races, based on the geometry and marketed benefits.
Sure thing, chief. I'd ask you which bikes you'd have in mind, but then you'd say that you're not going to play that game while waiting for someone else to mention benefits so that you can play that game yourself (ineffectually, I might add).
WhyFi is offline  
Old 03-07-18, 11:26 AM
  #47  
shoota 
Senior Member
 
shoota's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: not sure
Posts: 6,350
Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1004 Post(s)
Liked 29 Times in 25 Posts
So about 46-47mm mounted? Not too shabby.
__________________
2014 Cannondale SuperSix EVO 2
2015 Cannondale SuperX Hi-Mod
shoota is offline  
Old 03-07-18, 12:59 PM
  #48  
chas58
Senior Member
 
chas58's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Michigan
Posts: 3,553

Bikes: too many of all kinds

Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 704 Post(s)
Liked 34 Times in 28 Posts
Well, for a bike that can take large tires, it certainly is cheaper than a 3T, Open UP, or warbird. Those are not inexpensive options though.

Granted – if you want BD or China direct, you could be happier with an inexpensive frame – if you don’t need a frame with the quality, R&D, or latest innovations. (I can’t complain about my $400 ultegra bike).

Certainly there is lots of room to have tons of fun for less than $3000. Carbon isn’t (or shouldn’t be) the cheap option (I would rather have good AL or steel than cheap carbon).

GT grade is a great bike (for what it is), but doesn’t fit the trend towards 40mm+ tires. 35mm tires are just too small these days. Funny, but fat tire drop bar bikes are the “new thing” and command a premium.

But for what it is, the pricing isn’t bad. If you don't like the price, don't get carbon...
chas58 is offline  
Old 03-07-18, 01:00 PM
  #49  
chas58
Senior Member
 
chas58's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Michigan
Posts: 3,553

Bikes: too many of all kinds

Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 704 Post(s)
Liked 34 Times in 28 Posts
Speaking of Warbird, these are some interesting thoughts (Again, Salsa isn't the place to go for an inexpensive ride).


What About Checkpoint vs Warbird Carbon? That's a great question, and here's the deal- Trek, by really looking at the market, went in for versatility and not just for a pure racing bike, like Salsa did with the Warbird. Try fitting your Wabird with fenders, or a rack. Yeah......not easily done. The Warbird is rated for 43mm tires and the Checkpoint for 45's. Okay, without getting into a pissing match with you commenters, let's call that a draw. Then there is the final straw.....Try turning your Warbird into a single speed without buying anything beyond stock parts. Yeah..... To my mind, a good rig for the longer gravel days, adventures, and definitely for longer gravel events, must have a single speed option to bail yourself out with. In my opinion, that feature, which the Checkpoint has, alone trumps the Warbird. But there is more, like water carrying capacity, which the Checkpoint beats the Warbird in, and fork mounts, which the Warbird lacks. Then there is price. The Ultegra SL6 Checkpoint is sub-4G while the Warbird eclipses that price by a fair amount. To me, the choice is clear.

What Is A Negative About The Checkpoint? Well, there is one main thing I am not liking about the Checkpoint, and that is that Trek, (and some in the media), feel that these sort of bikes must have sporty handling. In other words, they should feel and ride like a Pro Tour bike, or they get tagged as being "cumbersome", which in their vernacular is the worst thing ever. So, many bikes like this get stffer-than-all-get-out forks, because if vibrations are muted, the bike feels "dead" and that means it must be slow, right? The front end has to be able to be "flickable", so you can change direction in a flash, because.....it feels fast. But here's the thing, feeling fast and actually being fast are often completely different things. But without getting down this rabbit hole further, Trek decided to stick with a stiff fork and a steep-ish head angle to appease roadie tendencies, because they are playing to what is the current fashion with media and racers. Not what the general populace really would benefit from.
More at: Guitar Ted Productions: Friday News And Views
chas58 is offline  
Old 03-12-18, 04:04 PM
  #50  
BigPoser
Senior Member
 
BigPoser's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Bakersfield, CA
Posts: 473

Bikes: Scott Foil Disc, Cuevas, BAHL Giro, BAHL Uno, BAHL Zwei

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 206 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Seattle Forrest View Post
GT Grade is $1,750 in 105, and full carbon, at Competitive Cyclist. Jenson has it for $2,200 with Ultegra, which is hydraulic (not sure about 105?) and also comes with carbon bars and seatpost. They're a little bit unclear on the clearance but probably 38 or 40 mm.
I have 36mm Clements on my Grade and that's the biggest it will fit comfortably on the stock rims. If you can squeeze on 38's or 40's there will be no clearance for mud or debris of any kind.
BigPoser is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.