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Tire clearance on 2004 Cannondale?

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Tire clearance on 2004 Cannondale?

Old 03-30-19, 04:39 PM
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due ruote 
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Tire clearance on 2004 Cannondale?

Does anyone have a 2004 ‘Dale tandem, and can you tell me the max tire size that will fit? Also does the frame have fender eyelets? TIA

(edit) one more - any idea what the weight is?

Last edited by due ruote; 03-30-19 at 04:43 PM.
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Old 03-30-19, 05:01 PM
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Does it have the "Fatty" fork and disc brake mounts front and rear?
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Old 03-30-19, 05:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Dean V View Post
Does it have the "Fatty" fork and disc brake mounts front and rear?
Definitely has disc brakes. Have not seen the bike in person but here is the 2004 catalog. Is Fatty what Cannondale calls it?

I am looking at the road model. Page 65 of the pdf.

http://vintagecannondale.com/year/2004/2004.pdf

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Old 03-30-19, 06:12 PM
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OK, I see now where it says Fatty fork, so yes to that question.
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Old 03-31-19, 01:05 AM
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I have that frame. 35mm tyres clear easily and I think 38mm would still be ok. Larger than that would be a getting tight.
There are fender eyelets on the fork and some on the seat stay but nothing at the rear drop outs. You probably improvise something there though with the caliper mounts etc.
You could certainly run fenders with 32mm tyres and maybe 35s.
Also be aware that these frames are 3cm shorter in the stoker compartment than the models before and after.
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Old 03-31-19, 05:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Dean V View Post
I have that frame. 35mm tyres clear easily and I think 38mm would still be ok. Larger than that would be a getting tight.
There are fender eyelets on the fork and some on the seat stay but nothing at the rear drop outs. You probably improvise something there though with the caliper mounts etc.
You could certainly run fenders with 32mm tyres and maybe 35s.
Also be aware that these frames are 3cm shorter in the stoker compartment than the models before and after.
Thanks, that’s very helpful. We have been riding an old Ibis with 26” wheels and have gotten used to the plush ride, so clearance for fairly wide tires is an imperative. I tend to think we would be fine on 35 mm, especially if we add a suspension post for the stoker.
Any idea what your bike weighs?
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Old 03-31-19, 09:52 AM
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Around 38 lb including pedals for a standard bike.
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Old 03-31-19, 04:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Dean V View Post
Around 38 lb including pedals for a standard bike.
Thanks. Probably about 9 lbs lighter than our Ibis, and, I am guessing, a good bit stiffer.
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Old 04-02-19, 09:25 AM
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Originally Posted by due ruote View Post

Thanks, that’s very helpful. We have been riding an old Ibis with 26” wheels and have gotten used to the plush ride, so clearance for fairly wide tires is an imperative. I tend to think we would be fine on 35 mm, especially if we add a suspension post for the stoker.
Any idea what your bike weighs?

26" wheels do not in themselves guarantee a plush ride. 26" tires come as small as 25mm and will thus ride just as hard as any 700C wheel with a 25mm tire. Pinch flats used to be the universal fear of everyone who throws a leg over a top tube. Max inflation pressure on the sidewall of the tire a must in order to not get pinch flats. That wisdom is being debunked. 80 psi in a 35mm tire should be a reasonable, firm pressure. Less is possible! 60 psi will be plusher still and safe, and the way not to pinch flat is to avoid curbs and railroad tracks and other surface anomalies at speed. I am not sure that affordable shock posts are worth anything. They will either sap already limited energy or not provide any useful shock absorption. Tires are, in 2019, about as good as it gets for 'suspension' on bicycles. FWIW. IMO. YMMV.
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Old 04-06-19, 07:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Leisesturm View Post
26" wheels do not in themselves guarantee a plush ride. 26" tires come as small as 25mm and will thus ride just as hard as any 700C wheel with a 25mm tire. Pinch flats used to be the universal fear of everyone who throws a leg over a top tube. Max inflation pressure on the sidewall of the tire a must in order to not get pinch flats. That wisdom is being debunked. 80 psi in a 35mm tire should be a reasonable, firm pressure. Less is possible! 60 psi will be plusher still and safe, and the way not to pinch flat is to avoid curbs and railroad tracks and other surface anomalies at speed. I am not sure that affordable shock posts are worth anything. They will either sap already limited energy or not provide any useful shock absorption. Tires are, in 2019, about as good as it gets for 'suspension' on bicycles. FWIW. IMO. YMMV.
I should have specified - we are currently on 1.75” Paselas (at about 60 psi) and they are the narrowest tires we have used.
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Old 04-07-19, 12:54 AM
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Originally Posted by due ruote View Post

I should have specified - we are currently on 1.75” Paselas (at about 60 psi) and they are the narrowest tires we have used.
I don't know .. I'm thinking that a 26" Ibis and a 700C Cannondale are like chalk and cheese from a usage/performance standpoint. The tires are only part of it. All the C'dales in our club are road rockets and have 28mm tires pumped to max inflation (>100psi). Even if you can stuff bigger tires in there and run lower pressures ... I don't know ... riding position, frame stiffness ... your o.p. as written doesn't make me think a C'dale is what you really want to be riding no matter how good a deal or whatever else is pointing you in its direction. We have a Trek with 2" Bontragers and they never see more than 50psi. 25psi is very common and sometimes I can't even get a pressure reading when I finally decide to put some air in the tires because I can't remember when the last time was. That bike is set up for upright riding with flat bars. Our drop bar Raleigh has 28mm tires and the Marathons take 110psi so that's what I've been putting in but anything above 90psi works. Two VERY different bikes for very different uses and in recent years the Raleigh gets used less and less. I don't think we rode it at all last year. The Trek we are on every single day.
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Old 04-27-19, 11:10 AM
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Originally Posted by Leisesturm View Post
I don't know .. I'm thinking that a 26" Ibis and a 700C Cannondale are like chalk and cheese from a usage/performance standpoint. The tires are only part of it. All the C'dales in our club are road rockets and have 28mm tires pumped to max inflation (>100psi). Even if you can stuff bigger tires in there and run lower pressures ... I don't know ... riding position, frame stiffness ... your o.p. as written doesn't make me think a C'dale is what you really want to be riding no matter how good a deal or whatever else is pointing you in its direction. We have a Trek with 2" Bontragers and they never see more than 50psi. 25psi is very common and sometimes I can't even get a pressure reading when I finally decide to put some air in the tires because I can't remember when the last time was. That bike is set up for upright riding with flat bars. Our drop bar Raleigh has 28mm tires and the Marathons take 110psi so that's what I've been putting in but anything above 90psi works. Two VERY different bikes for very different uses and in recent years the Raleigh gets used less and less. I don't think we rode it at all last year. The Trek we are on every single day.
Well, we will find out. We wound up getting a really solid deal on the bike, so I figure we will try it for a while and sell if we don’t like it. We have done a couple quick rides (max 30 miles) with 32mm Paselas and it felt pretty good. Definitely more responsive than the Ibis, as expected, but not what I would call harsh. Then again I am the captain. But no real complaint from the stoker either, other than position, as she prefers upright Northroads bars, which aren’t there yet.
Btw I do have drop bars on the Ibis, so for me there wasn’t much of a transition position-wise. If anything I’d say the Cannondale is a slightly better fit by virtue of a marginally shorter top tube.
The Cannondale does appear to be about 10# lighter than the Ibis, which is obviously pretty attractive. But the plan is to keep both for a while (maybe permanently?) and see how it goes. In the meantime I would be happy to hear other suggestions for sub-40# bikes that have good tire clearance, smooth ride quality, and a price that isn’t like buying a car.
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Old 05-16-19, 11:13 AM
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To answer my original query (just in case anyone is interested) I mounted some 38mm Soma Supple Vitesse tires on the Cannondale with no problems. I think with a bit of care, I can still put fenders on if we decide we want them.
Any bigger than 38mm, I would be pushing it at the fork crown. Still plenty of room elsewhere. I think these tires will be plenty plush for the riding we do, so we are content.
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