Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

What's the deal with people looking down on old frames?

Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

What's the deal with people looking down on old frames?

Old 05-09-19, 11:42 PM
  #1  
turtledove
Member
Thread Starter
 
turtledove's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Earth
Posts: 30

Bikes: 2005 Specialized Dolce Elite, 19?? Avitar Expert

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 5 Posts
What's the deal with people looking down on old frames?

I have a late 80s/early 90s chromaly rigid MTB that I've spent lots of love and care into. Whether in powdercoating, threadless stem conversion, tuning, etc. Over the time I've worked on this, couple of the experience I've dealt with, wondering if you can share similar experiences or takes on these:
  1. At first glance, they assume it's an old Walmart bike (which it surely is not) and pass judgement my way without giving it a closer look. I've had a bike shop mechanic do that and turn my bike away from service.
  2. Make passing jokes/comments at my expense. Like the time someone I met went into a full rant about how trash the biopace on my bike are, without warranting any such discussion. Yes, it's universally ridiculed, but it works for me and I haven't had any problems with it, thanks.
  3. I must be stupid for putting so much money into this, about $500 dollars in parts and service. Oh boy, if saving money was my priority. then I wouldn't be into mountain biking. It's about having fun, no idea why this is such a sticking point. If you want to do it and can afford it, do it, right? It's like telling the folks who like to supercharge their Honda Civics to save up for a Bugatti haha.
  4. "Don't do X or Y, you won't get the value out of it." This makes me smile, as if I'm some scrapper trying to refurbish bikes to resell.
  5. "Don't bother doing X, save up for another bike." I don't need the newest and shiniest carbon bike at the moment. This thing has lit a spark of joy in me for mountain biking and backpacking, and I'll buy the newest YT Jeffsy when I feel like my skills have progressed to deserve having one.
Even though I try not to let it get to me, I can't really avoid it when it comes up in the face-to-face interactions with certain bike shops, fellow riders, or random people on the Net. What do you guys think about it?
turtledove is offline  
Old 05-10-19, 12:42 AM
  #2  
SurferRosa
Senior Member
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 891

Bikes: old school 531c & campy

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 369 Post(s)
Liked 47 Times in 33 Posts
The only time I look down on an old frame is usually when I'm staring at one of my bikes. Just fixed there, gawking. Gawping. Ogling. Vacant. A minute passes. Then two... It's bad.
SurferRosa is offline  
Likes For SurferRosa:
Old 05-10-19, 12:49 AM
  #3  
turtledove
Member
Thread Starter
 
turtledove's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Earth
Posts: 30

Bikes: 2005 Specialized Dolce Elite, 19?? Avitar Expert

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by SurferRosa View Post
The only time I look down on an old frame is usually when I'm staring at one of my bikes. Just fixed there, gawking. Gawping. Ogling. Vacant. A minute passes. Then two... It's bad.
Hahaha
turtledove is offline  
Old 05-10-19, 01:28 AM
  #4  
merziac
Senior Member
 
merziac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: PDX
Posts: 4,028

Bikes: Merz x 5 + Specialized Merz Allez x 2, Strawberry/Newlands, Gordon, Fuso/Moulton, Bornstein, Paisley, Paramounts, 3rensho, Moto TC, Raleigh Pro's, Marinoni, 1960 Cinelli SC, 1980 Bianchi SC and more

Mentioned: 92 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1109 Post(s)
Liked 53 Times in 40 Posts
Originally Posted by turtledove View Post
I have a late 80s/early 90s chromaly rigid MTB that I've spent lots of love and care into. Whether in powdercoating, threadless stem conversion, tuning, etc. Over the time I've worked on this, couple of the experience I've dealt with, wondering if you can share similar experiences or takes on these:
  1. At first glance, they assume it's an old Walmart bike (which it surely is not) and pass judgement my way without giving it a closer look. I've had a bike shop mechanic do that and turn my bike away from service.
  2. Make passing jokes/comments at my expense. Like the time someone I met went into a full rant about how trash the biopace on my bike are, without warranting any such discussion. Yes, it's universally ridiculed, but it works for me and I haven't had any problems with it, thanks.
  3. I must be stupid for putting so much money into this, about $500 dollars in parts and service. Oh boy, if saving money was my priority. then I wouldn't be into mountain biking. It's about having fun, no idea why this is such a sticking point. If you want to do it and can afford it, do it, right? It's like telling the folks who like to supercharge their Honda Civics to save up for a Bugatti haha.
  4. "Don't do X or Y, you won't get the value out of it." This makes me smile, as if I'm some scrapper trying to refurbish bikes to resell.
  5. "Don't bother doing X, save up for another bike." I don't need the newest and shiniest carbon bike at the moment. This thing has lit a spark of joy in me for mountain biking and backpacking, and I'll buy the newest YT Jeffsy when I feel like my skills have progressed to deserve having one.
Even though I try not to let it get to me, I can't really avoid it when it comes up in the face-to-face interactions with certain bike shops, fellow riders, or random people on the Net. What do you guys think about it?
We love it, period.

Welcome aboard, you have come to the right place, glad you found us.

Go around, say "Hi" and or comment on several threads, get your post count up to 10, and then "pics or it didn't happen" as we like to say.

The people you are encountering are not your/our tribe, they don't care or get it and think their prejudice justifies being snobby and condescending when they are simply ignorant.

We will help you get sorted.
merziac is offline  
Likes For merziac:
Old 05-10-19, 01:46 AM
  #5  
chico81 
Senior Member
 
chico81's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Temecula, CA
Posts: 250

Bikes: 1983 Austro Daimler - Puch Pacifica, 1984 Miyata 310, 1983 Univega Gran Tourismo, 1989 Peugeot Triathlon, 1989 Bridgestone MB-1, 1992 Klein Rascal, 1992 Cannondale M-700

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 43 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 20 Times in 17 Posts
Originally Posted by SurferRosa View Post
The only time I look down on an old frame is usually when I'm staring at one of my bikes. Just fixed there, gawking. Gawping. Ogling. Vacant. A minute passes. Then two... It's bad.
Ive been known to do this... wife has to snap me out of it! Haha

I look down on those who look down on vintage. Luckily, both of my favorite LBSí love my vintage stuff and ask me to bring more for them to work on/oogle at!
chico81 is offline  
Old 05-10-19, 05:32 AM
  #6  
Cl904
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 307
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 101 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 19 Times in 15 Posts
If they look down on them, more for us!
Cl904 is offline  
Old 05-10-19, 05:58 AM
  #7  
RobbieTunes 
Half drunk? Finish!
 
RobbieTunes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Very Southern Indiana
Posts: 25,758
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 346 Post(s)
Liked 60 Times in 50 Posts
It's someone else's carbon footprint, long ago redeemed.
Puts you so far ahead, the other idjits can't catch up.
__________________
Robbie ♪♫♪...☻
I have unfinished business.

RobbieTunes is offline  
Likes For RobbieTunes:
Old 05-10-19, 06:00 AM
  #8  
ridelikeaturtle
Senior Member
 
ridelikeaturtle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Posts: 663

Bikes: Bianchi Ti Megatube, M Alloy Pro, Sprint 76; Amp Research B4; Colnago Crystal; Klein Pulse; Litespeed Catalyst

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 295 Post(s)
Liked 38 Times in 25 Posts
One of my riding mates "looked down" on one of my old bikes, until my bikes consistently get all the "wow, that's a beautiful bike" comments from people at coffee stops. (It may also be because he never cleans his bike, and hasn't changed the bar tape in a decade...)

So screw the begrudgers, don't let them get you down.
ridelikeaturtle is offline  
Old 05-10-19, 06:15 AM
  #9  
johnnyace 
Shut up and ride!
 
johnnyace's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Oregon
Posts: 1,089

Bikes: All the bikes

Mentioned: 46 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 476 Post(s)
Liked 22 Times in 16 Posts
I think the attitude you are seeing may be more prominent amongst the MTB crowd than it is with road bikers. But then, I usually only ride with other C&Vers, so I'm not sure. We recently had some funny/interesting comments from folks when we did the annual Monster Cookie Ride here, but then, we also passed a lot of folks on $3,000 plastic wonderbikes, and one lady that had fallen over not a mile into the ride on hers, and couldn't get up because she was stuck in her clipless pedals.
johnnyace is offline  
Old 05-10-19, 06:17 AM
  #10  
wrk101
Thrifty Bill
 
wrk101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Mountains of Western NC
Posts: 22,017

Bikes: 86 Katakura Silk, 87 Prologue X2, 88 Cimarron LE, 1975 Sekai 4000 Professional, 73 Paramount, plus more

Mentioned: 67 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 654 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 39 Times in 34 Posts
+10 Just tell them you are being green.

Personally, I like the negative comments. It just tells me how stupid the person is, and I can add them to the ignore list.

Negative comments from idiots = ignore!

My favorite ride started as a beat to crap $15 garage sale bike. I ride it with pride!
wrk101 is offline  
Likes For wrk101:
Old 05-10-19, 06:20 AM
  #11  
rustystrings61 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Greenwood SC USA
Posts: 764

Bikes: 2002 Mercian Vincitore, 1982 Mercian Colorado, 1976 Puch Royal X, 1973 Raleigh Competition, 1971 Gitane Tour de France and others

Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 263 Post(s)
Liked 33 Times in 21 Posts
The late Ken Kifer wrote, 'The bike shop owner tried to persuade me that my bike was no longer worth keeping up (his bill would have bought a decent machine). He gave me a nice catalog full of beautiful bikes. It was time to let the old bike go. He asked me if there was anything that my old bike had that a newer bike wouldn't, and I said, "memories." '

I'm fortunate - the manager of my favorite LBS will call me for information on C&V bikes, and has acquired a couple himself. The other LBS, while they carry nothing of interest to me, can at least feign interest in lugged steel when they see it. When I was part of the really active cycling scene here, other riders figured out I was someone to ride with despite having either friction shifters on the downtube or even no shifters at all and a fixed rear cog.

I think there are at most really three important things to think about when choosing a bike. First, does it work? That covers all the things like safety and mechanical condition and gear-changing if there are variable gears, brakes, all that stuff. Not - is it latest greatest, but does it work? Then, does it fit? And again, not whatever the latest whiz-bang FitKit contemporary fad position, but does it fit your individual body as a cyclist in a way that perhaps conforms to more than a century of chain-driven bicycles. And finally, the really subjective one, do you like it? Does it make you smile? Do you ever have those alternating moments of the bike disappearing under you and effortlessly going down the road, then being acutely aware of what an awesome bike you are on at that very instant? Sometimes even the humblest old bike can provide that moment. I remember the late Richard Ballentine writing about how his "greatest, happiest tour was on a 1935 B.S.A. that shed its vital parts like water." That I can quote that line 45 years after reading it gives an idea of its value.

It sounds to me like you have a bike that you love and have history with. I'd say you're the winner here.
rustystrings61 is offline  
Old 05-10-19, 06:32 AM
  #12  
Spaghetti Legs 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Central Virginia
Posts: 3,212

Bikes: Numerous

Mentioned: 69 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 797 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 16 Times in 14 Posts
Welcome OP!

Most people view their bikes as tools to go somewhere, exercise, etc whereas others, like us folks here in C/V, see them not only as tools, but finely crafted machines, even art. I see folks out riding high end bikes covered in grime and dirt, brakes adjusted by flipping the quick release lever, etc. You won’t see much of that with the riders in this forum.

Riding my Carrera, I passed a guy on a climb the other day, said hi, kept on going. He caught back up to me, riding a higher end Trek (with Campy 11 though!) and he told me how much he liked seeing a bike like mine on the road. We rode together for several miles and had a nice time.
__________________
N = '96 Colnago C40, '04 Wilier Alpe D'Huez, '10 Colnago EPS, '85 Merckx Pro, '89 Merckx Century, '85 Moser, '86 Tommasini Professional, '04 Teschner Aero FX Pro, '05 Alan Carbon Cross, '86 De Rosa Professional, '82 Colnago Super, '95 Gios Compact Pro, '95 Carrera Zeus, '84 Basso Gap, Ď89 Cinelli Supercorsa
Spaghetti Legs is offline  
Old 05-10-19, 06:34 AM
  #13  
nomadmax 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 680
Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 303 Post(s)
Liked 85 Times in 47 Posts
Originally Posted by turtledove View Post
I have a late 80s/early 90s chromaly rigid MTB that I've spent lots of love and care into. Whether in powdercoating, threadless stem conversion, tuning, etc. Over the time I've worked on this, couple of the experience I've dealt with, wondering if you can share similar experiences or takes on these:
  1. At first glance, they assume it's an old Walmart bike (which it surely is not) and pass judgement my way without giving it a closer look. I've had a bike shop mechanic do that and turn my bike away from service.
  2. Make passing jokes/comments at my expense. Like the time someone I met went into a full rant about how trash the biopace on my bike are, without warranting any such discussion. Yes, it's universally ridiculed, but it works for me and I haven't had any problems with it, thanks.
  3. I must be stupid for putting so much money into this, about $500 dollars in parts and service. Oh boy, if saving money was my priority. then I wouldn't be into mountain biking. It's about having fun, no idea why this is such a sticking point. If you want to do it and can afford it, do it, right? It's like telling the folks who like to supercharge their Honda Civics to save up for a Bugatti haha.
  4. "Don't do X or Y, you won't get the value out of it." This makes me smile, as if I'm some scrapper trying to refurbish bikes to resell.
  5. "Don't bother doing X, save up for another bike." I don't need the newest and shiniest carbon bike at the moment. This thing has lit a spark of joy in me for mountain biking and backpacking, and I'll buy the newest YT Jeffsy when I feel like my skills have progressed to deserve having one.
Even though I try not to let it get to me, I can't really avoid it when it comes up in the face-to-face interactions with certain bike shops, fellow riders, or random people on the Net. What do you guys think about it?
My usual response to this kind of unasked for opining is to drop them and their newer "better" bike like a hot rock. When they manage to catch up, I usually tell them it's not the bike, it's the rider.
nomadmax is offline  
Old 05-10-19, 06:38 AM
  #14  
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Posts: 19,406

Bikes: 1959 & 1960 Capo; 1982 Bianchi; 1988 Schwinn KOM-10;

Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 698 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 21 Posts
First, I don't give a damn what other people think -- never have.

Second, I hate wasting money and resources, so if something I own still serves my purposes, I am extremely reluctant to replace it. You earn, save, and invest your way to prosperity and financial independence; only rarely will spending get you there.

Third, anybody with money can have the latest high-end equipment, but to own an older bicycle, car, appliance, or house that is still in good working order requires patience, skill, and dedication.

Fourth, ignoring the first item on my list, I ride my Team USA red-white-and-blue no-suspension Schwinn mountain bike in the annual Neptune Ave. Fourth of July parade. Last year someone yelled out, "A red, white, and blue bike -- nice!" My Capo Modell Campagnolo road bike draws a lot of favorable comments at Bike to Work Day and other events.
__________________
"Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing." --Theodore Roosevelt
Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324
Capo: 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1982 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline  
Old 05-10-19, 06:47 AM
  #15  
j.scud.22
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
+1 on Shimano Biopace - I think it works brilliantly on my touring bike. To me, they just feel great and it's bombproof.

Chalk the rest of it up to western society's obsession with monetizing everything. Case in point, I recently picked up a Fuji Sports 10 that was a garage queen for 40 years. Yeah, it was low end, but if you enjoy the karma of restoring old stuff it pays for itself (i.e. we all know the difference between level/category, price/value, etc). At the end of the day, they're gonna miss old ten speeds when they're gone, after they're burned out on Ubers and Marvel movies....
j.scud.22 is offline  
Likes For j.scud.22:
Old 05-10-19, 06:51 AM
  #16  
KonAaron Snake 
Fat Guy on a Little Bike
 
KonAaron Snake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 16,805

Bikes: Two wheeled ones

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1053 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 11 Posts
The amount of time I spend caring about what others think...

Most of the threads like this donít match my experiences either - I very rarely hear others criticize someone elseís bike - any comments you hear tend to be positive. Usually folks like crazy old bikes.

Biopace is fine for casual riding...it feels weird over time when youíre really cranking. If you like it, use it. Most people donít know what it is.
KonAaron Snake is offline  
Old 05-10-19, 06:52 AM
  #17  
momo608
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 91

Bikes: bikes I like

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Except for food, I'm only interested in things that are no longer made. One second giving thought to what someone else thinks about what interests me, is a second wasted.
momo608 is offline  
Old 05-10-19, 06:55 AM
  #18  
P!N20
Senior Member
 
P!N20's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 460
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 184 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 15 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by nomadmax View Post
My usual response to this kind of unasked for opining is to drop them and their newer "better" bike like a hot rock. When they manage to catch up, I usually tell them it's not the bike, it's the rider.
Yep, let your legs do the talking.
P!N20 is offline  
Likes For P!N20:
Old 05-10-19, 07:09 AM
  #19  
BFisher
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: NEPA
Posts: 267
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 31 Times in 27 Posts
It can take a lot of insecurity to feel the need to bash another person's material possessions unsolicited. Just keep that in mind.

As far as bike shops, if one is at a place where they can turn away customers like that, then they must be doing something right business-wise.

The truth is, the LBS is just another option - sometimes a good one, sometimes a poor one. Most people with a decent understanding of how bikes work, and some basic tools, can enjoy years of wrenching and riding without ever setting foot in a bike shop. For technical advice beyond one's own knowledge, just read Sheldon Brown's website, and use the Googles.

Just ride on.

BTW, got any pics of the bike?
BFisher is offline  
Old 05-10-19, 07:09 AM
  #20  
randyjawa 
Senior Member
 
randyjawa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada - burrrrr!
Posts: 9,149

Bikes: 1958 Rabeneick 120D, 1968 Legnano Gran Premio, Rocky Mountain Cardiac

Mentioned: 144 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 598 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 35 Times in 32 Posts
To the OP - wanna fix or even buy my old black and white TV? Well, in my opinion, vintage bikes, to our newer generations, fall into that same category - old, out dated and pretty much useless in an all color, high density media society.

And, for what it is worth, I really like old bicycles and the kids make me chuckle with their inexperience in life, in almost all things. But we all gotta learn.

My first ride, on a too small Trek road bike, lasted less than 100 feet. Why would anyone want to ride this or that when either is just old and silly, when compared to a new mountain bike, or one of those BMX things. But look at me today - built owned and ridden hundreds of vintage road bikes...
__________________
Learn how to find, restore and maintain vintage road bicycles at... MY "TEN SPEEDS"
randyjawa is offline  
Likes For randyjawa:
Old 05-10-19, 07:28 AM
  #21  
texaspandj
Senior Member
 
texaspandj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Heart Of Texas
Posts: 3,328

Bikes: '86 , '87 , '88 , '89 Centurion Dave Scott Ironman.

Mentioned: 83 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1121 Post(s)
Liked 42 Times in 37 Posts
^^^Nice bike and Nice pic.
texaspandj is offline  
Old 05-10-19, 08:01 AM
  #22  
turtledove
Member
Thread Starter
 
turtledove's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Earth
Posts: 30

Bikes: 2005 Specialized Dolce Elite, 19?? Avitar Expert

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by rustystrings61 View Post
The late Ken Kifer wrote, 'The bike shop owner tried to persuade me that my bike was no longer worth keeping up (his bill would have bought a decent machine). He gave me a nice catalog full of beautiful bikes. It was time to let the old bike go. He asked me if there was anything that my old bike had that a newer bike wouldn't, and I said, "memories." '

I'm fortunate - the manager of my favorite LBS will call me for information on C&V bikes, and has acquired a couple himself. The other LBS, while they carry nothing of interest to me, can at least feign interest in lugged steel when they see it. When I was part of the really active cycling scene here, other riders figured out I was someone to ride with despite having either friction shifters on the downtube or even no shifters at all and a fixed rear cog.

I think there are at most really three important things to think about when choosing a bike. First, does it work? That covers all the things like safety and mechanical condition and gear-changing if there are variable gears, brakes, all that stuff. Not - is it latest greatest, but does it work? Then, does it fit? And again, not whatever the latest whiz-bang FitKit contemporary fad position, but does it fit your individual body as a cyclist in a way that perhaps conforms to more than a century of chain-driven bicycles. And finally, the really subjective one, do you like it? Does it make you smile? Do you ever have those alternating moments of the bike disappearing under you and effortlessly going down the road, then being acutely aware of what an awesome bike you are on at that very instant? Sometimes even the humblest old bike can provide that moment. I remember the late Richard Ballentine writing about how his "greatest, happiest tour was on a 1935 B.S.A. that shed its vital parts like water." That I can quote that line 45 years after reading it gives an idea of its value.

It sounds to me like you have a bike that you love and have history with. I'd say you're the winner here.
Thanks! Yeah that's a great quote

Originally Posted by KonAaron Snake View Post
The amount of time I spend caring about what others think...

Most of the threads like this donít match my experiences either - I very rarely hear others criticize someone elseís bike - any comments you hear tend to be positive. Usually folks like crazy old bikes.

Biopace is fine for casual riding...it feels weird over time when youíre really cranking. If you like it, use it. Most people donít know what it is.
Yeah I should make it clear that these are the minority of experiences, although it happens often enough for me to notice. The MTB community is by and large a great one
turtledove is offline  
Old 05-10-19, 08:29 AM
  #23  
Fahrenheit531 
50th Anniversary Edition
 
Fahrenheit531's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 3,453

Bikes: Schwinn Paramount ('71) and Volare ('78); Raleigh Competition GS ('79)

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 544 Post(s)
Liked 57 Times in 32 Posts
Originally Posted by turtledove View Post
Even though I try not to let it get to me, I can't really avoid it when it comes up in the face-to-face interactions with certain bike shops, fellow riders, or random people on the Net. What do you guys think about it?
I don't go to "certain bike shops." As for the "random people," disregard and ride on. Or engage in spirited debate. Whatever. They're just people, and these are just bikes; best not to take things so seriously.
__________________
A race bike in any era is a highly personal choice that at its "best" balances the requirements of fit, weight, handling, durability and cost tempered by the willingness to toss it and oneself down the pavement at considerable speed. ~Bandera
Fahrenheit531 is offline  
Old 05-10-19, 08:30 AM
  #24  
tkamd73
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Menomonee Falls, WI
Posts: 439

Bikes: 1984 Schwinn Supersport, 1988 Trek 400t, 1977 Trek TX900, 1982 Bianchi Champione del Mondo, 1988 Trek 400 Elance, 1978 Raleigh Supercourse, 1991 PDG Paramount OS

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 146 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by j.scud.22 View Post
+1 on Shimano Biopace - I think it works brilliantly on my touring bike. To me, they just feel great and it's bombproof.

Chalk the rest of it up to western society's obsession with monetizing everything. Case in point, I recently picked up a Fuji Sports 10 that was a garage queen for 40 years. Yeah, it was low end, but if you enjoy the karma of restoring old stuff it pays for itself (i.e. we all know the difference between level/category, price/value, etc). At the end of the day, they're gonna miss old ten speeds when they're gone, after they're burned out on Ubers and Marvel movies....
Agreed, but those Marvel movies are pretty good.
Tim
tkamd73 is offline  
Old 05-10-19, 09:27 AM
  #25  
2old
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 1,571
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 211 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
Hasn't happened to me, but maybe the "elite" in socal aren't as vocal or prejudiced. You might point out that during the period of development for these bikes, a different color scheme wasn't treated like a functional improvement.
2old is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.