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Full Hydraulic brakes on a long-distance AT excursion bike? Yea or Nay?

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Full Hydraulic brakes on a long-distance AT excursion bike? Yea or Nay?

Old 05-13-19, 03:40 PM
  #26  
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920 is a 29er touring bike .. on a bike tour you won't have to ride through the night..

Unless you are into that sort of thing ..
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Old 05-13-19, 07:37 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
I am not familiar with electronic shifting systems, are the Li Ion batteries easy to remove from the bike for air travel?
Mine's not. It is in the seat-post, and I have no clue how to remove it and live in irrational but nonetheless crippling fear that it will never work again if I try.
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Old 05-14-19, 06:53 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
I am not familiar with electronic shifting systems, are the Li Ion batteries easy to remove from the bike for air travel?
the way I read the regs, it would be better to leave them installed if you can make sure they will not be actuated. But etap batteries come right off, there is one on each derailleur. And they are small enough that it would be wise to have spares on a 1200k. Di2 batteries are often buried in the frame.

The industry is moving away from rim brakes, the main thing I'm worried about is the availability of good rims. I think we're already seeing fewer rim brake rims. It's a lot easier to make a disc rim, doesn't really have to be straight. At least none of the rims I ever got from Stan's was anywhere near straight.
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Old 05-14-19, 07:50 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
the way I read the regs, it would be better to leave them installed if you can make sure they will not be actuated. But etap batteries come right off, there is one on each derailleur. And they are small enough that it would be wise to have spares on a 1200k. Di2 batteries are often buried in the frame.

The industry is moving away from rim brakes, the main thing I'm worried about is the availability of good rims. I think we're already seeing fewer rim brake rims. It's a lot easier to make a disc rim, doesn't really have to be straight. At least none of the rims I ever got from Stan's was anywhere near straight.
I assumed all Li Ion batteries were prohibited in checked bags, but your reference to the regs made me look. Covered in Q2.
https://www.faa.gov/about/office_org..._batteries.pdf

So it looks like it is possible to legally carry the batteries that are installed in the device. I was unaware of that.
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Old 05-16-19, 10:39 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
I assumed all Li Ion batteries were prohibited in checked bags, but your reference to the regs made me look. Covered in Q2.
https://www.faa.gov/about/office_org..._batteries.pdf

So it looks like it is possible to legally carry the batteries that are installed in the device. I was unaware of that.
FYI, I was pulled from boarding a flight and taken to the baggage security screening area in the bowels of the airport because the scanner indicated there was a battery in the frame. I was required to remove the Di2 battery from my seatpost and place it in my carryon. No argument, no discussion either remove or you and the bike don't get on the plane! Fortunately, I am familiar with my equipment and was able to do this fairly simply. I was the last person to board and they held the plane for me.
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Old 05-16-19, 12:02 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by velopig View Post
FYI, I was pulled from boarding a flight and taken to the baggage security screening area in the bowels of the airport because the scanner indicated there was a battery in the frame. I was required to remove the Di2 battery from my seatpost and place it in my carryon. No argument, no discussion either remove or you and the bike don't get on the plane! Fortunately, I am familiar with my equipment and was able to do this fairly simply. I was the last person to board and they held the plane for me.
That is what I thought would happen before I did a bit of research (above), so it sounds like it does not really matter what the text says, you should NOT check any Li Ion batteries at all. Thanks for posting.

I have often carried a saddle and pedals in a carry on, but I suspected that they might think a seatpost is a club (weapon), so I never carried a seatpost in a carry on.
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Old 05-16-19, 12:19 PM
  #32  
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That's good information, thanks for letting us know about it. It's not real surprising, I suppose
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Old 05-16-19, 01:13 PM
  #33  
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I sensed the battery in the carry-on is a fire that can be extinguished because It's accessible ...


but one in checked luggage is not... ... have not flown in 18 years..


maybe arrange to buy one on the other side..

have it shipped, surface, when you're done with trip.





..

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Old 05-28-19, 03:50 AM
  #34  
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That Trek is an attractive bike.

Originally Posted by AllWeatherJeff View Post
However, trains will be integral to my bikepacking itineraries once our western re-tranplantation is complete.
Will you be standing next to the bike, guarding it against potential damage; or will you have to put it into a baggage car and just hope that no oaf throws anything onto it; or something between these extremes?

Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
The industry is moving away from rim brakes, the main thing I'm worried about is the availability of good rims.
I happen to be in Japan. Here there's at least one company manufacturing (or anyway having its name attached to) new 126mm and even 120mm OLD rear hubs. (Here.) Not sure about 120mm, but I imagine that wherever you are, with a little websearching and/or ingenuity you too would be able to locate new or as-new126mm rear hubs. I suspect that this tells us something about the continuing availability of aluminium rims. I'm pretty sure that I'll predecease the disappearance of rim-brake-suitable rims -- and if I were a lot less sure of it, I'd buy half a dozen as spares.
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Old 05-28-19, 07:10 AM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
...
The industry is moving away from rim brakes, the main thing I'm worried about is the availability of good rims. I think we're already seeing fewer rim brake rims. It's a lot easier to make a disc rim, doesn't really have to be straight. At least none of the rims I ever got from Stan's was anywhere near straight.
Originally Posted by microcord View Post
...
I happen to be in Japan. Here there's at least one company manufacturing (or anyway having its name attached to) new 126mm and even 120mm OLD rear hubs. (Here.) Not sure about 120mm, but I imagine that wherever you are, with a little websearching and/or ingenuity you too would be able to locate new or as-new126mm rear hubs. I suspect that this tells us something about the continuing availability of aluminium rims. I'm pretty sure that I'll predecease the disappearance of rim-brake-suitable rims -- and if I were a lot less sure of it, I'd buy half a dozen as spares.
My expedition bike has Ryde (formerly Rigida) CSS rims. They have a braking surface that will not wear out in normal use. When my rims get dirty and muddy, I do not even bother to clean it off because the rim braking surface is so abrasion resistant that the mud won't abrade the rim surface. The CSS rims cost twice as much as the plain braking surface rims, but in the six years since I built up that bike, the braking surface is as good as new.

With so many people switching to discs, Ryde has recently stopped making CSS rims.

That is another example of a top quality rim brake rim disappearing from the market.

Shimano steel axle XT rear hubs for touring bikes are easy to find in 36 hole for disc brakes, but it is nearly impossible to find one of the older steel axle XT 36 hole hubs for rim brakes, I have not seen a new one in years. Everybody seems to be going to 32 spokes, but for touring you really want 36 spokes.

I am sure that rim brakes and brake pads will always be available, but might be lower end products instead of the shiny higher end brakes that almost look like jewelry.
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