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Should I trade my bike in for something more practical?

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Should I trade my bike in for something more practical?

Old 05-13-19, 09:41 AM
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fat2fit
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Should I trade my bike in for something more practical?

A bit of background. Iím a new rider, I purchased an entry level mountain bike and hit the trails hard for the first month of riding and decided itís not really my thing. As an ex-motocross racer, I love the dirt and the adrenaline, but I ride solo and itís too dangerous out there and frankly, I hated how my mountain bike rode on the street. 95% of my riding is on the street/pavement. I ride my bike to the gym each day, around town to run errands when I donít want to take my car and the weather is nice out, and just a casual rider who wants a bike to ride around town. I donít really want to get super involved into a new hobby, so I decided against mountain biking. I traded my mountain bike in for a race bike. I got a good deal on it, itís a 2014 Opus Allegro 3.0 (full carbon bike). Itís got some upgrades like Ultegra group set and aftermarket hubs. I love how fast the bike is but itís too small for my frame. I need a large, this bike is a small. After riding my road bike for the last month I decided I definitely want something that can roll fast, but maybe something more practical and more durable than carbon. I donít have smooth paved city streets, we have cracks in the road, cracks in the sidewalks, curbs I need to jump over, etc. The road bike was very limiting in this respect. Iím a heavy rider (250lbs), and the full carbon bike was super light but I felt like I had to baby it all the time, worrying one bad jump over a curb or hard hit pothole and my bike was finished.


I went to my LBS and theyíre willing to trade me my bike straight up for a brand new 2019 Trek Dual Sport 2. The bike features wider tires that can go off road on some basic trails, but still rolls well. I really like the flat handlebars/upright riding position and the comfort the bike has. The bike does have disc brakes over my wheel brakes I currently have, and the bike has more gears. I understand the quality of some components is less than what my bike has, but for my purposes I feel like it could suit me more. One thing Iím on the fence about is the front fork. While I donít plan to ride my bike on trails, ever Ė I do like that the bike does feature a fork with lockout, so I can ride it around town but still be able to clear potholes/curbs if I needed to (since I am a big guy, I feel like this is good for me). Iím not concerned about weight of the bike at all. Some people told me to go with a Trek FX3 over a Trek DS2, but the FS3 doesnít have disc brakes (on the model Iím looking at), and while it does have a rigid fork, Iím not sure if thatís something I really want because I may put more wear on the bike given my weight.

Basically, Iím looking for a solid commuter bike to cruise around town, something that can take a dirt-path or shortcut if need be (which I canít right now on my road bike). Is a DS2 a good choice?
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Old 05-13-19, 09:45 AM
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didn't read but the answer is no. You should just buy another bike, rinse and repeat
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Old 05-13-19, 10:05 AM
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fat2fit
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Originally Posted by Flip Flop Rider View Post
didn't read but the answer is no. You should just buy another bike, rinse and repeat
I'm not really wanting to keep the road bike though. If you didn't read why would you reply?
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Old 05-13-19, 11:17 AM
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You traded in your mountain bike for the Opus, was it the same shop now offering to take it back in trade for the Trek ? The Opus has expensive upgrades and might be worth more than they are offering. Have you tried selling it yourself ? Almost sounds like you might be taking a beating with the trade ins.

Post down in the hybrid forum for opinions on current year hybrids, they are all more or less the same, the one you mentioned has hydraulic discs, pros and cons on those. At least take the Opus with you to a few different shops and see if you get a better offer.

And demand a test ride, and a bike fit before you buy.
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Old 05-13-19, 11:25 AM
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I didn’t read it either, to long, but enjoy reading the responses, which pretty much gets me to your point.
Tim
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Old 05-13-19, 01:12 PM
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You're trading a lot more more bike than you're receiving.
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Old 05-13-19, 01:26 PM
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I am a fairly new rider
I bought a road bike in 2011 and while it was fun, it was harsh and i always wanted to go on the gravel trails but didnt because the little 23c tires
Then in 2016 i bought a gravel bike with 32or36c tires and it was fun for about a month but quickly got boring asf on the paved street sold it and kept on my 2011 road bike
I was still seeking a little more comfort and the ability to hit hard pack.... i ended up on a 2019 Roubaix its got future shock, carbon frame, carbon seatpost and 28c tires
I feel like i can go anywhere now, even off curbs and tear down sidewalks, its super smooth, i can go fast and have the option to go up to 30c tires

If that sounds like you consider a road bike you can stuff 30 or 32 tires in or go for a pure cyclocross/gravel bike to get a mix of everything
other option is always add to the bike stall and get 1 for each
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Old 05-13-19, 02:30 PM
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Originally Posted by BirdsBikeBinocs View Post
You're trading a lot more more bike than you're receiving.
Hi,

Yeah I'm considering just selling it myself for $1200 (canadian) and going from there. I didn't trade in my mountain bike to the shop, it was a private deal. I traded a Marlin 5 for my Opus Allegro 3.0, that was a good trade IMO. I LOVE my road bike, don't get me wrong. I love how light it is with the full carbon frame, how fast it rides and how smooth it is...I just don't like my limitations. I'm highly considering, if my LBS will do it- Trade straight up for a Trek FX3 Disc. I'm pretty sure they'll trade for a FX3 but I may have to nudge them to let me get the Disc model.

Last edited by fat2fit; 05-13-19 at 02:43 PM.
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Old 05-13-19, 03:12 PM
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Most people transition off of a hybrid onto a road or mountain bike since hybrids generally tend to be mediocre at everything. I will say that if you decide to get one, I recommend also getting a loop handlebar (Jones h-bar, Origin8 Strongbow, etc) since the extra hand positions over a flat bar are really nice.

As far as I know, the current hotness is getting a non-suspended drop bar frame that can clear wider tires and fitting big slicks (650B 47c+, 700C 40c+). They're supposed to be slower accelerating (weight) but similar sustained speed to road tires if you're under 20mph and fine on gravel and non-technical off road, so fairly good at everything but the extremes. Haven't tried it myself.
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Old 05-13-19, 03:21 PM
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Originally Posted by grayrest View Post
Most people transition off of a hybrid onto a road or mountain bike since hybrids generally tend to be mediocre at everything. I will say that if you decide to get one, I recommend also getting a loop handlebar (Jones h-bar, Origin8 Strongbow, etc) since the extra hand positions over a flat bar are really nice.

As far as I know, the current hotness is getting a non-suspended drop bar frame that can clear wider tires and fitting big slicks (650B 47c+, 700C 40c+). They're supposed to be slower accelerating (weight) but similar sustained speed to road tires if you're under 20mph and fine on gravel and non-technical off road, so fairly good at everything but the extremes. Haven't tried it myself.
I personally want to get rid of my road bike due to the handlebars being a loop-bar. I ride on the hoods or middle most of the time, and like the upright riding position the flat bar offers. What you're suggesting would be a gravel bike, wouldn't it?
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Old 05-13-19, 03:25 PM
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Originally Posted by fat2fit View Post
I personally want to get rid of my road bike due to the handlebars being a loop-bar. I ride on the hoods or middle most of the time, and like the upright riding position the flat bar offers. What you're suggesting would be a gravel bike, wouldn't it?
You need to figure out what you really want. You are throwing a lot of money away. You may be better off getting a bike fit, rather than continually changing entire bikes.
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Old 05-13-19, 03:30 PM
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Originally Posted by phughes View Post
You need to figure out what you really want. You are throwing a lot of money away. You may be better off getting a bike fit, rather than continually changing entire bikes.
How have I thrown any money away? I literally traded a $500 bike for a bike worth double and haven't done anything else since aside from asking questions.
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Old 05-13-19, 03:39 PM
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Originally Posted by fat2fit View Post
I personally want to get rid of my road bike due to the handlebars being a loop-bar. I ride on the hoods or middle most of the time, and like the upright riding position the flat bar offers.
You're talking about a drop bar. A loop bar comes from the mountain bike world and looks like a flat bar with an extra loop in front. I'd link examples but this account is too new for the forum rules to allow linking.

Edit: The wide tire trend I mentioned is part of the gravel push but other companies are pushing it under different names. WTB wants to call it Road plus and a couple bike manufacturers call it all road instead of gravel and there are options that are basically road geometry with wide clearance (Rondo HVRT, Surly Midnight Special, Open U.P.).

Last edited by grayrest; 05-13-19 at 03:48 PM.
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Old 05-13-19, 04:01 PM
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If you ride the DS and like the DS, then get the DS. suspension forks (with lockout) really do help on the bumpy roads. (So does a sprung searpost). It's not a full on MTB, and it's not a full on low-rolling resistance road bike, but it suits a casual riding experience on bumpy roads.
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Old 05-13-19, 04:04 PM
  #15  
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Originally Posted by fat2fit View Post

Basically, Iím looking for a solid commuter bike to cruise around town, something that can take a dirt-path or shortcut if need be (which I canít right now on my road bike). Is a DS2 a good choice?
The FX3 Disc or DS2 should meet your needs and be rugged enough for your weight - just make sure that you can get one that truly fits you. This takes time in the saddle and that is not something that is routinely available before purchase. If you can find an LBS that will let you take one out for 10 miles then I'd say that's the place to buy.

The entry-level components on these bikes should be fine and work properly for many years of use. Both bikes use 32 spoke rims and have triple cranks with a medium-wide range cassette - the FX3 has a somewhat lower low gear. The FX3 comes with a 32mm tire - check to see if bigger tires will fit - 38mm and above provide a nice ride at 40 - 50 psi - maybe the shop will switch them out for no charge if bigger tires fit. The DS2 comes with 38mm tires.

Plenty of rack/fender eyelets on both bikes - the only difference is I'm not sure if fenders would work on the front suspension fork of the DS2 - if this matters in your climate. I'm a fan of multi-purpose bikes that are useful for recreation and utility. This type of bike may get ridden more which means you will ride more.

I would not trade your current bike for either of these 1:1 - try to sell your current bike yourself.

Lastly, I'd suggest that you look around at other brands - Giant, Specialized, Raleigh, too many to list. There are many bikes in this category and in your price range. I'm still a fan of drop bar bikes - but those that have the characteristics that you are looking for. For example, the Salsa Journeyman Sora shown below.

Good luck and post your progress.



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Old 05-13-19, 05:39 PM
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Originally Posted by fat2fit View Post
How have I thrown any money away? I literally traded a $500 bike for a bike worth double and haven't done anything else since aside from asking questions.
Relax, I'm just answering questions, and offering an opinion. You do not have to take my advice, or anyone else's for that matter.

Your Opus Allegro 3.0 when new, had an MSRP of $2198. Bluebook on it now is $680-$704 in excellent condition. But, if it doesn't fit you, or your needs, then it isn't the bike for you. The fit itself can be altered with a new stem, etc., but if it doesn't fit your needs, then it doesn't fit your needs. The Trek has an MSRP of $659.99, so yeah, based on today's bluebook price, a straight of trade isn't bad, provided you end up liking the bike.

You just seem to be wandering aimlessly between bikes, not really understanding what it is you really want. That isn't necessarily a bad thing, and I am not criticizing you, just making an observation. As long as you can get good deals, and afford it, it's great to try different bikes.

You are very fortunate to have a bike shop that will trade, and work with you. Treat that bike shop well. Good luck.
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Old 05-14-19, 01:06 PM
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Thanks again for the replies. I can't really afford to spend $700-$1000 on ANOTHER bike, so I'm taking advantage of selling or trading my road bike. The bike is a size small, I need a large. It really is just too damn small for me and I don't feel safe on my road bike with the 110 psi rock hard 23mm tires, its just not for me. I love the speed, but do not enjoy the comfort at all.

After doing extensive research on the internet it seems like everyone is really against front suspension on Hybrid bikes, but as a big rider weight isn't too much of an issue and I do like having that option of being able to go on a bit rougher terrain rather than not being able to. The fork-lockout seems to work well from what I've read, how much more will this REALLY slow me down for commuting around town? Keep in mind, I live in Canada. The roads are awful from the weather and we do have lots of bike lanes and stuff, but I really miss being able to "jump off" or "jump on" curbs and stuff like I did with my mountain bike, that's why I'm leaning towards a dual sport. I'm not going to be riding any trails, maybe just rail road paths and dirt short-cuts that consist of hard packed dirt/grass. I want something less aggressive than a mountain bike, but something I can put wide slicks on for faster rolling speed.

I'm going to be going to my LBS today and test riding the DS2 and something along the lines of a Hybrid with rigid fork as well to compare, they don't have any Trek FX in stock at all (special order), but I will ride a Norco brand or something similar to compare the ride of each bike.

Is the Dual Sport 2 going to be more comfortable than a "Fitness" bike, such as an FX3? The frame seems to have a shorter and lower top bar than the "Fitness" version bikes. I'm wanting something comfortable to ride long distances around town.

Thanks for the help and I'll let you know what I decide later today.
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Old 05-14-19, 02:29 PM
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Originally Posted by fat2fit View Post
...95% of my riding is on the street/pavement...

... Basically, Iím looking for a solid commuter bike to cruise around town, something that can take a dirt-path or shortcut if need be...
I don't think the front shock is needed. A hybrid with 38-42c tires will offer a much softer ride off pavement than the road bike but still be great for on pavement.
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Old 05-14-19, 02:53 PM
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Originally Posted by teejaywhy View Post
I don't think the front shock is needed. A hybrid with 38-42c tires will offer a much softer ride off pavement than the road bike but still be great for on pavement.
What about a front shock w/ the lockout though? Isn't that the same thing but just opens up the option to have suspension or not? As a heavy/strong rider, I could really care less about the 3 lbs of weight it adds to my bike. Does it slow you down that much extra? The only reason I'm still holding on to the front suspension is because I do enjoy riding off and on curbs, being able to ride over cracks/potholes incase I don't have time to react and not worrying about damaging my bike. I watched these 2 youtube videos and it doesn't seem as bad as people make it out to be that's why I'm so torn between the DS and the FX.
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Old 05-14-19, 04:18 PM
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For what it's worth I just sold my 2018 Giant Roam 3 disc hybrid, which was a very decent bike. No way would I have risked riding up a curb on it but I did jump off curbs out of the seat. I chose a gravel bike as my new ride, it is faster, stronger, more comfortable and goes where the Roam would fall apart.

Lot's of people ride hybrids, but I do believe you would kill the rims by hitting curbs, unless you know how to bunny hip or something.
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Old 05-14-19, 04:52 PM
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My $0.02 Get a full suspension mtb and put on 50mm slick tires. Then you can jump off any curb (or anything) you like, and the suspension will help absorb the landing, and with less risk of taco'ing the wheels. That bike will allow you to go anywhere, except loose mtb. The slick tires, along with locking out the suspension will make it plenty fast, but if you ever want it to go faster, just get a 2nd wheelset with thinner rims and tires.

I wonder why you think mtb is dangerous, even if solo? Most people, including myself, believe the opposite. Though the quick little uphills in mtb might be tough for a someone who weighs 1/8 of a ton. I have a road, a rigid hybrid, and a full-sus mtb. To me, the fun that mtb offers is orders of magnitude more than road or gravel., especially considering you enjoyed motocross.

If I could only have one, it would be a full squish mtb.

Last edited by Riveting; 05-14-19 at 04:56 PM.
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Old 05-14-19, 05:11 PM
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Originally Posted by fat2fit View Post
After doing extensive research on the internet it seems like everyone is really against front suspension on Hybrid bikes, but as a big rider weight isn't too much of an issue and I do like having that option of being able to go on a bit rougher terrain rather than not being able to. The fork-lockout seems to work well from what I've read, how much more will this REALLY slow me down for commuting around town?
Assuming you keep it locked out all the time, the extra weight is not going to significantly slow you down. You can feel it when you lift the bike and if you time hill climbs but unless you're pushing for time you're really unlikely to notice the difference if you're not looking for it. Of course, if you leave it locked out then there's really no point in having it. It is possible to ride suspended bikes without a lot of power loss if you pedal in circles. My folding bike is full suspension and I only get noticeable suspension bob (power loss) when I lose pedal technique from spinning too fast or sprinting. I don't mind the suspension on that bike because the small diameter 355 wheels do not deal well with bad asphalt at speed and the suspension keeps them in contact with the road but for 584/622 wheels I'd much rather just run wider tires at lower pressure.

The main thing that determines your speed is the amount of power you put out. Working against that is body position (aerodynamic drag) and your tires (rolling resistance). Assuming you don't have some sort of MTB knobby tires, aero is the dominant factor once you start going over ~25kph. Specifically, the more upright riding position of a hybrid with flat bars increases your frontal area and you're likely to lose ~3-5 kph from the extra drag. Weight affects your acceleration and speed up hills but it's impact is determined by the combined weight of the bike and rider so even a kilogram increase in bike weight is only a 1-2% change for larger riders.
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Old 05-14-19, 05:30 PM
  #23  
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I would get a Giant Tough road. I actually have a 2017 Giant atx lite, which I would recommend if they still sold them. I think the 2018 was called a arx. I use it for dirt road or whatever. The Jones H loop bars are a big part of the versatility.

Last edited by baldilocks; 05-14-19 at 05:36 PM.
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Old 05-14-19, 06:20 PM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by zarbog View Post
For what it's worth I just sold my 2018 Giant Roam 3 disc hybrid, which was a very decent bike. No way would I have risked riding up a curb on it but I did jump off curbs out of the seat. I chose a gravel bike as my new ride, it is faster, stronger, more comfortable and goes where the Roam would fall apart.

Lot's of people ride hybrids, but I do believe you would kill the rims by hitting curbs, unless you know how to bunny hip or something.
Originally Posted by Riveting View Post
My $0.02 Get a full suspension mtb and put on 50mm slick tires. Then you can jump off any curb (or anything) you like, and the suspension will help absorb the landing, and with less risk of taco'ing the wheels. That bike will allow you to go anywhere, except loose mtb. The slick tires, along with locking out the suspension will make it plenty fast, but if you ever want it to go faster, just get a 2nd wheelset with thinner rims and tires.

I wonder why you think mtb is dangerous, even if solo? Most people, including myself, believe the opposite. Though the quick little uphills in mtb might be tough for a someone who weighs 1/8 of a ton. I have a road, a rigid hybrid, and a full-sus mtb. To me, the fun that mtb offers is orders of magnitude more than road or gravel., especially considering you enjoyed motocross.

If I could only have one, it would be a full squish mtb.
Originally Posted by grayrest View Post
Assuming you keep it locked out all the time, the extra weight is not going to significantly slow you down. You can feel it when you lift the bike and if you time hill climbs but unless you're pushing for time you're really unlikely to notice the difference if you're not looking for it. Of course, if you leave it locked out then there's really no point in having it. It is possible to ride suspended bikes without a lot of power loss if you pedal in circles. My folding bike is full suspension and I only get noticeable suspension bob (power loss) when I lose pedal technique from spinning too fast or sprinting. I don't mind the suspension on that bike because the small diameter 355 wheels do not deal well with bad asphalt at speed and the suspension keeps them in contact with the road but for 584/622 wheels I'd much rather just run wider tires at lower pressure.

The main thing that determines your speed is the amount of power you put out. Working against that is body position (aerodynamic drag) and your tires (rolling resistance). Assuming you don't have some sort of MTB knobby tires, aero is the dominant factor once you start going over ~25kph. Specifically, the more upright riding position of a hybrid with flat bars increases your frontal area and you're likely to lose ~3-5 kph from the extra drag. Weight affects your acceleration and speed up hills but it's impact is determined by the combined weight of the bike and rider so even a kilogram increase in bike weight is only a 1-2% change for larger riders.
Thanks everyone for their replies. I spent some decent time at my LBS today and rode both the DS2 and a rigid fork. Decided to go for the DS2. I actually felt much, MUCH More comfortable on it than the other bike. The riding position is EXACTLY what I was looking for. It's actually alot faster than I thought coming off my road bike. For giggles I unlocked the suspension and rode around, it's so comfortable and not that bad for our roads. I'm very happy with my purchase and the option to have the suspension or not is very nice for where I live.

My LBS doesn't even stock many of the FX bikes due to where we live they're not very good compared to the DS

The reason I think mountain biking alone is dangerous is because I live in BC, it's all downhill literal mountains and very sketch if you fly off the side of the mountain and you're out there alone.

Last edited by fat2fit; 05-14-19 at 06:31 PM.
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Old 05-14-19, 06:27 PM
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fat2fit
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