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Looking for tire recommendation for Clydesdale

Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

Looking for tire recommendation for Clydesdale

Old 05-26-19, 08:20 PM
  #1  
cj19
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Looking for tire recommendation for Clydesdale

I'm looking for advice on the best road tire for us clydesdales. For reference I'm about 5'9" and 240 lbs, so I'm never going to be fast and most of my rides are in the 12 mph to 15 mph range for anywhere from 20 to 100 miles of distance.
My road bike is a Trek Domane SL6 with carbon frame and aluminum wheelset. It came with Bontrager R2 Hard-case Light tires in 700x32c size. I thought those would feel slow but I committed to try them for 1000 miles and I fell in love with them. The 32mm width provided a lot of comfort and road noise was practically non-existent. If the width affected the speed at all I didn't notice and the reality is that if I wanted to be faster I should just skip lunch

After 3,000 miles I replaced the Bontragers with a set of Continential GP4000s I won at a club event. They are 700x28 and so far I've been quite disappointed in them. Had a couple of pinch flats but the bigger disappointment is the amount of road noise I feel now. I'm not sure which factor is causing the unpleasant ride: the lower tire profile, the lower width (32 vs 28) or the rubber characteristics. I typically ride at about 100 psi because my large butt makes for a lot of tire deflection at lower pressures.

So I'm looking for actual real-life experience from clydesdales on what you have found to be the most comfortable tire set up. Include info on tire size, pressure you run at, and any other tips. Thanks!
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Old 05-27-19, 07:31 AM
  #2  
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There is no advantage to going with narrower tires. In a 'performance road bike' context, 28mm is not really narrow, but obviously narrower than what works for you.

I am about your weight and personally don't see any reason to go narrower than 32mm tires. That allows me to run at a bit lower pressure than with 28s or narrower, and are still reasonably light.

FWIW, the old theory that wider tires have higher rolling resistance has been debunked. Rolling resistance is a result of the tire casing deflecting as the wheel rotates, and narrower tires have to deflect more than wider tires. All other things being equal (like you find two sets of tires with identical construction but different widths), you will have slightly less rolling resistance from the wider tires, but better shock absorption and traction.
Narrower tires are generally lighter (helps a bit on clmibs and while accelerating), and the narrower profile causes less aerodynamic drag at speed, but in most situations for non-racers it doesn't make any real difference.

Also, while you enjoyed your Bontrager tires, I bet if you found a set of less robustly built tires (my favourites are Panaracer Paselas) in the same size, you would find them much nicer to ride. You may get flats more often, though.
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Old 05-27-19, 07:55 AM
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I ran R2 Hard Case Lights in 32mm on my Trek X-Caliber mountain bike because I was using it only on the road. I liked them. When I got my road bike I tried some GP4000s but they didn’t hold up well for me on my roads and at my weight (250).

I went to Tubeless rims on my road bike and installed some Specialized Roubaix Pro tires in 32mm. It’s a very nice tire for about $45. Rolls a little better than the R2s, though honestly I couldn’t comment on noise as my hearing isn’t great. I’m now running the Roubaix Pros on two different bikes. They have a slight bit more rolling resistance than I’d like but in about 5000 miles of riding I haven’t had a single puncture that didn’t seal. I can’t comment on how the puncture resistance would be with tubes, but I’d imagine on par or slightly better than the R2s based simply on the feel of the tires while installing them.

Im not sure what to say about comfort. I run them at 80F/90R. Comfort seems about the same as any other 32mm tire I’ve tried.

-Matt
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Old 05-27-19, 09:04 AM
  #4  
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I’m 220# and love my Panaracer Gravel Kings in 38mm. I inflate to about 70 psi and they are comfortable and fast enough. Did a century in March and I won’t even think of trying another tire.
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Old 05-27-19, 09:24 AM
  #5  
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Originally Posted by Mmassey338 View Post
Iím 220# and love my Panaracer Gravel Kings in 38mm. I inflate to about 70 psi and they are comfortable and fast enough. Did a century in March and I wonít even think of trying another tire.
Iíve been meaning to pick up a pair for my Diverge. I donít think they will fit on the OPís Domane, though. Im guessing 32s will be the biggest that will fit.

-Matt
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Old 05-27-19, 10:13 AM
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If you fell in love with the Bontragers as you mentioned, why not get another set of those?
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Old 05-27-19, 11:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Aahzz View Post
If you fell in love with the Bontragers as you mentioned, why not get another set of those?
Was that a 'logical answer?' That has no place on this site!
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Old 05-27-19, 12:13 PM
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I have a '17 Domane SL6 with the carbon rims....switched it to R3s when the R2s began to show wear...excellent tires (32 wide). I'm at 210lbs.

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Old 05-27-19, 05:07 PM
  #9  
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Originally Posted by cj19 View Post
I'm looking for advice on the best road tire for us clydesdales. For reference I'm about 5'9" and 240 lbs, so I'm never going to be fast and most of my rides are in the 12 mph to 15 mph range for anywhere from 20 to 100 miles of distance.
My road bike is a Trek Domane SL6 with carbon frame and aluminum wheelset. It came with Bontrager R2 Hard-case Light tires in 700x32c size. I thought those would feel slow but I committed to try them for 1000 miles and I fell in love with them. The 32mm width provided a lot of comfort and road noise was practically non-existent. If the width affected the speed at all I didn't notice and the reality is that if I wanted to be faster I should just skip lunch

After 3,000 miles I replaced the Bontragers with a set of Continential GP4000s I won at a club event. They are 700x28 and so far I've been quite disappointed in them. Had a couple of pinch flats but the bigger disappointment is the amount of road noise I feel now. I'm not sure which factor is causing the unpleasant ride: the lower tire profile, the lower width (32 vs 28) or the rubber characteristics. I typically ride at about 100 psi because my large butt makes for a lot of tire deflection at lower pressures.

So I'm looking for actual real-life experience from clydesdales on what you have found to be the most comfortable tire set up. Include info on tire size, pressure you run at, and any other tips. Thanks!
Someone once told me "never run a tire narrower in millimeters than your waist size measured in inches." Nowadays it's something I live by. Thin, light, low protection tires are often the most comfortable so if you're cycling in Nirvana and need no flat protection you have plenty of options. I need all the flat protection I can get so I started buying Continental Top Contact II's, having moved on from the stiffer riding Specialized Armadillos.

Tires decisions are pretty much an exercise in compromise. One must find their happy place within the boundaries of weight, flat protection, ride quality, price, grip, and durability. The Top Contact II's provide me with a balance of the important variables I'm most concerned with and are available in sizes that work for me. All the name brand manufacturers offer tires that address the different variables. No manufacturer makes a tire that excels in every category, hence the compromise.

It sounds like you need to think about what some of the more important qualities in a tire you're looking for. And, as others have suggested, consider a wider tire for the advantage of running lower air pressure and a more comfortable ride. And remember, whatever size you choose must fit your frame.


-Kedosto

Commuter setup: Conti Top Contact II, 700x42 @ 70R/50F
Flat Bar Rigid Errand Runner: Conti Top Contact II, 700x47 @ 55R/40F
Drop bar Fast Joyrider: Specialized Infinity Armadillos, 700x35 @ 85R/65F
A few others not listed but you get the idea.

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Old 05-28-19, 05:09 AM
  #10  
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Hey Storm, thanks for your reply. Could you tell me more about the difference between the R2s and the R3s? The R3s certainly sound like a better tire but they are also 50% more expensive. I'm just wondering if the additional cost is noticeable in the performance of the tire. Thanks in advance for your thoughts.
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Old 05-28-19, 06:19 AM
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First post here. I am currently riding the Schwalbe G-One all rounds that came with my ALR 5 gravel. I ride 100% road and am very impressed with these tires. Fast rolling, great cornering and smooth ride. My current weight is 232lbs and running about 50psi in the front and 60psi in the rear.

Ben
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Old 05-28-19, 06:40 AM
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Originally Posted by cj19 View Post
Hey Storm, thanks for your reply. Could you tell me more about the difference between the R2s and the R3s? The R3s certainly sound like a better tire but they are also 50% more expensive. I'm just wondering if the additional cost is noticeable in the performance of the tire. Thanks in advance for your thoughts.
In my mind the R3s are better...don't remember why I moved to them though, although I think there was a claim of less rolling resistance. To be perfectly honest, I'm a D group rider edging towards C, so will likely never experience the real benefit of a better tire. Tire pressure for me a big key to comfort, especially on the 100Ks...I am running 60 front /70 rear. Cheers!
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Old 05-28-19, 08:25 AM
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Originally Posted by MattTheHat View Post
When I got my road bike I tried some GP4000s but they didnít hold up well for me on my roads and at my weight (250).
Used GP4000s for a period. Liked the road feel a lot (nice and grippy), but too many flats and cuts so pitched them (got decent miles from them). Been using Vittoria Corsa Pro G+ and have been happy with those (25mm). Not quite as grippy as GP4000, and perhaps a bit stiffer, but just fine for my needs (which don't include racing) at around 200lb. I think only one flat so far with 2000+ miles on at least one of them. Not sure how the G2.0 version compares to the G+ version.
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Old 05-28-19, 08:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Kedosto View Post
Someone once told me "never run a tire narrower in millimeters than your waist size measured in inches.".
So we're all supposed to ride around on beach cruisers?

This advice can't be right - I know pros are fit, but do they all have waists under 28"?
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Old 05-28-19, 09:24 AM
  #15  
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Originally Posted by MattTheHat View Post
Iíve been meaning to pick up a pair for my Diverge. I donít think they will fit on the OPís Domane, though. Im guessing 32s will be the biggest that will fit.

-Matt
You are probably right about the size for the Domane, and I think youíd like the 38ís on your Diverge. I almost bought one.
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Old 05-28-19, 10:19 AM
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Originally Posted by drewguy View Post
So we're all supposed to ride around on beach cruisers?

This advice can't be right - I know pros are fit, but do they all have waists under 28"?
The recommendation doesnít apply to pros. The advice was to help non-pros find comfort (and by extension, happiness) on their bicycles. All I know is that my waist size is in the 34 -36 range and once I decided it was gonna be 35ís or bigger things got a lot more comfortable.

I confess I do have a bike that will only accept 28ís max, but Iím not losing any sleep over it. And no, we all donít have to ride beach cruisers either. My drop bar commuter accepts tires up to 700x50 - with fenders. I donít own any beach cruisers.

The new understanding that wider does not equal slower is fantastic. Whatís nice is the availability of frames that easily accept wider tires, and an increase in the number of quality tires from which to choose. Frankly, unless one is riding competitively, I think the axiom is pretty much spot on. But, YMMV.


-Kedosto
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Old 05-28-19, 05:32 PM
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335lbs. Went from GP 4 Season 32c's back to my Durano Plus 28c's. They are more comfortable, quiet and durable imo. Never had a flat on them.



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Old 05-28-19, 10:41 PM
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I place a lot of value on not flatting on my rides so I eventually ended up with Schwalbe Marathon Plus on all my bicycles. I ride a 27 x 1 1/4" (32mm) and a 40mm on 700c's both upright bikes. I ride a Ryan Vanguard recumbent with 26 x 1.5"R and 20 x 1.5" front. The comment about bigger tires rolling just as well as smaller definitely is true with these tires. My 40mm, which I run about 10psi low, rolls every bit as well as the 32mm tires. Both are very good on pavement but the 40mm owns the dirt. The 32mm is OK for gravel roading. I keep the recumbent on paved roads only. I tried several different brands and used Vittoria brand for several years. At my weight the rear tires delaminate or otherwise disintegrate after a year of riding. I split riding tasks between three bicycles and half of my riding is off road. That means the tires last roughly 3 years on my bikes before replacement. I average 10 to 15 miles per day or roughly 3000 miles per year. The rear Schwalbe's fail in the same time frame. The only difference is a lot less flats than other brands. I have not noticed them being any harder to push that lighter same size tires.
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Old 05-28-19, 11:12 PM
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Been using the Conti all seasons for about a year now and I am a big rider at about 230 although I use them on my bike with hed Ardennes so a 25 runs about 28 so less psi and dont need to worry about pinch flats get about 3 thousand miles out of a back tire and maybe one or 2 flats at most on the back don't recall ever getting a flat on the front tire
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Old 06-03-19, 06:09 PM
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Panracer Paselas, have 32s(80+- psi) on one bike, 35s(70-75ps+-) on the other. I've ridden Paselas for 15+ years, one of the best values going and a good ride, I'm 245+-lbs.
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Old 06-03-19, 09:53 PM
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Another vote for Paselas, 300# rider.
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Old 06-03-19, 11:10 PM
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I am about your height and weight and had been using Continental GP4000SII in 28mm and now am using Compass Chinook Pass Standards in 28mm. I will go to 32s when they are done. The Contis were great, and very, very sticky in damp, but the Compass (now Rene Herse) ride better, plus they have tan sidewalls. They are made by Panaracer for Rene Herse Cycles.

I have not had any flats with either, but I do use "tire wipers" or "flint catchers." (https://www.renehersecycles.com/shop...c/tire-wipers/) I have used the tire wipers since my old tubular days in the 1970s. When I sold my 1973 Fuji I forgot to remove them and found the Rene Herse versions. I have found the Contis do pick up more grit and road dirt, but the wipers do their thing. The Conti 28s actually measure 30mm on my A23 rims. The Compass are 28mm.

Some scoff at the tire wipers as old school or useless, but they have worked for me for many years mainly on road riding. Plus they are good conversation starters. I do not do curb jumping and am also careful and look out for holes and debris on the road, and if riding towpaths, I will stop and walk real bad spots.

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Old 06-05-19, 12:54 AM
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I'm another fan of the Conti GP 4 Seasons. 32mm won't fit on my current bike, so, I'm running 28's. But, at considerably more pressure, 120'ish. The GP 4 Season combines the best of the 4000's supple case, with the duramesh sidewalls, double layers of vectran puncture protection, instead of just a one layer, and the stickiest of their black chilli rubber compounds. They wear slightly quicker than some, but, have always provide me with ample traction and cut resistance. Over the years, I've found that punctures can have as much to do with the tube as the tire. Michelin Airstops seem to be my favorites, in this regard.
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Old 06-12-19, 12:39 PM
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I'm running Bontrager H2s on my Trek and I just put Panaracer Tours on my Fuji. I have had great experience with all Bontrager tires I've used, and I will have to see how the Panaracers work out. The Panaracers came highly recommended and are relatively inexpensive - $19 each.
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Old 06-15-19, 02:40 PM
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I see I'm late to this, as I usually am. But if you're still shopping I wanted to offer my choice.
I'm a bit unusual I guess having once been a Cat. 2 Roadie, hardcore commuter and tourer. That was a previous lifetime ago though.

Anyhoo, I did all my racing and commuting and even some light touring on tubulars (aka sew-ups, glue-ons, etc). I still ride them and when I bought my Domane 5.2 I got to work building a new set of tub wheels. But before I actually had them built, I put a couple thousand miles on the original Bontragers and use them occasionally still if I blow a tub (rarely) and have to wait for the glue to set up.

For the Bontragers I won't use anything other than Veloflex Master 25s. I'm pushing 240 now and no other clincher I've tried comes as close the the "tubular experience" than these (I ride Veloflex Roubaixs for tubs). They are very durable as well although I admittedly only ride on good quality rural roads. I'm very impressed with Veloflex tires.

Hth
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