Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Petrol instead of degreaser

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Petrol instead of degreaser

Old 03-03-21, 11:42 PM
  #26  
MarcusT
Senior Member
 
MarcusT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: NE Italy
Posts: 1,029
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 472 Post(s)
Liked 212 Times in 123 Posts
Seems like a tragedy screaming for a lawsuit waiting to happen
MarcusT is offline  
Old 03-04-21, 01:48 AM
  #27  
Geepig
Senior Member
 
Geepig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Eastern Poland
Posts: 558

Bikes: Romet Jubilat x 4, Wigry x 1, Turing x 1

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 158 Post(s)
Liked 134 Times in 105 Posts
But gasoline was so much fun: pour some down inside a long single piece exhaust pipe (such as from an old Mini), then light with a match and listen as the flame front travelled down the pipe and then came right back.

Later I became an R&D engineer specialising in fuels and oils in suspension in gases moving through complex spaces. It was so much fun.

But using it today as a cleaner in the workplace?

Um... no...
Geepig is offline  
Old 03-04-21, 03:06 AM
  #28  
Amt0571
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Catalonia
Posts: 883

Bikes: Canyon Grand Canyon AL SL 8.0, Btwin Ultra 520 AF GF, Dahon Mu P27, Triban Road 7, Benotto 850

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 373 Post(s)
Liked 167 Times in 112 Posts
Gasoline is "easily" flammable. Diesel fuel is much better and safer, and can accomplish the same thing.
Amt0571 is online now  
Old 03-04-21, 04:23 AM
  #29  
Seb1987
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2021
Posts: 17
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by andrewclaus View Post
Your shop manager should know better. You may want to review other safety procedures at the shop--first aid kit clearly marked, fire extinguishers at each exit and clearly mounted and marked, safe oily rag storage, safe egress routes, use of PPE, etc.

And why is petrol available there anyway? Is it stored safely?
Well since it's a non profit organization I'm guessing maybe petrol is cheaper than degreaser. They really try to re-use as much as possible too. It's stored on a shelf in a 40m² room which actually has a closed fireplace/furnace on the other side of the room. I'm going to check the other safety measures as you mentioned.

To everyone else here: Thank you for your answers, in conclusion of what I have read from all of you is that petrol/gasoline can be used as a degreaser BUT is still considered very dangerous and unhealthy so it should not be used.
Seb1987 is offline  
Old 03-04-21, 09:35 AM
  #30  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 23,748

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 120 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3982 Post(s)
Liked 1,416 Times in 874 Posts
Originally Posted by spelger View Post
Had to bring jelly doughnuts into this, huh?
I used to use Wonder bread but jelly donuts are more relatable. Admit it, you want one now
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 03-04-21, 03:04 PM
  #31  
andrewclaus
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Golden, CO
Posts: 2,031

Bikes: 2016 Fuji Tread

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Liked 146 Times in 113 Posts
I calculated years ago that gasoline's calories are cheaper than food calories. About ten years ago, when gas prices rose to over $4/gal, a motorist pulled up beside me at a light and said, "You must be saving a lot on gas!" I shook my head and replied, "You should see my grocery bills."
andrewclaus is offline  
Old 03-04-21, 10:47 PM
  #32  
Jeff Wills
Insane Bicycle Mechanic
 
Jeff Wills's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: other Vancouver
Posts: 9,501
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 660 Post(s)
Liked 293 Times in 191 Posts
I was going to recount tales of the burn unit at the hospital where I work but then y'all started talking about donuts and now my brain has wandered off and got lost...
__________________
Jeff Wills

Comcast nuked my web page. It will return soon..
Jeff Wills is offline  
Old 03-05-21, 11:14 AM
  #33  
geeteeiii
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Estonia
Posts: 70

Bikes: HVZ Meteor 1979, HVZ Champion 1962, HVZ SS Moskva80 1981, Dürkopp 1936

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Liked 111 Times in 29 Posts
I use it to clean chains personally, put the chain in a sealed container, let it soak, agitate the dirt with a brush and now you have a clean chain. Most effective metal cleaners are flammable from my experience. Keeping a open container of it inside might not be a good idea yeah.
geeteeiii is offline  
Likes For geeteeiii:
Old 03-05-21, 10:15 PM
  #34  
rickpaulos
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: middle of the Great Corn Desert
Posts: 227
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 48 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 30 Times in 25 Posts
forbidden donut, aggggggh.




Last edited by rickpaulos; 03-05-21 at 10:26 PM.
rickpaulos is offline  
Likes For rickpaulos:
Old 03-05-21, 10:28 PM
  #35  
Jeff Wills
Insane Bicycle Mechanic
 
Jeff Wills's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: other Vancouver
Posts: 9,501
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 660 Post(s)
Liked 293 Times in 191 Posts
Originally Posted by geeteeiii View Post
I use it to clean chains personally, put the chain in a sealed container, let it soak, agitate the dirt with a brush and now you have a clean chain. Most effective metal cleaners are flammable from my experience. Keeping a open container of it inside might not be a good idea yeah.
No matter what, petrol/gasoline will vaporize when you open the container to put in or take out the chain.

I've used kerosene in the same fashion and it works pretty darn well. Plus it's easy to filter the kerosene and reuse it. A gallon of kerosene is a couple bucks and it will last for many years of enthusiastic chain cleaning.
__________________
Jeff Wills

Comcast nuked my web page. It will return soon..
Jeff Wills is offline  
Old 03-05-21, 11:32 PM
  #36  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 23,748

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 120 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3982 Post(s)
Liked 1,416 Times in 874 Posts
Originally Posted by geeteeiii View Post
I use it to clean chains personally, put the chain in a sealed container, let it soak, agitate the dirt with a brush and now you have a clean chain. Most effective metal cleaners are flammable from my experience. Keeping a open container of it inside might not be a good idea yeah.
Yes but some are more flammable than others. Gasoline has a flash point of -40°F. Mineral spirits, on the other hand, has a flash point of from 70°F to 130°F, depending on formulation. Odorless mineral spirits have a flashpoint of around 100°F. It will burn but it takes a lot more to get it to burn. Mineral spirits works just as well without the whole “burning down the house” thing.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 03-06-21, 10:19 PM
  #37  
Jeff Wills
Insane Bicycle Mechanic
 
Jeff Wills's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: other Vancouver
Posts: 9,501
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 660 Post(s)
Liked 293 Times in 191 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Yes but some are more flammable than others. Gasoline has a flash point of -40°F. Mineral spirits, on the other hand, has a flash point of from 70°F to 130°F, depending on formulation. Odorless mineral spirits have a flashpoint of around 100°F. It will burn but it takes a lot more to get it to burn. Mineral spirits works just as well without the whole “burning down the house” thing.
Dammit, now I'm having Talking Heads flashbacks to go with the donuts.

__________________
Jeff Wills

Comcast nuked my web page. It will return soon..
Jeff Wills is offline  
Likes For Jeff Wills:
Old 03-08-21, 12:08 PM
  #38  
afm199
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 30
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Liked 12 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by davidad View Post
I cup of gasoline vapor is equal to at least a stick of dynamite.
Well, strictly speaking, no, it's more like one ounce of gasoline has about the same energy equivalent as one ounce of dynamite, but it is indeed very dangerous.
afm199 is offline  
Old 03-08-21, 01:14 PM
  #39  
pfaustus
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 117

Bikes: 1980 Motobecane Super Touring, 1980? Trek 620, 1964 Dunelt, 1991 Specialized Hardrock Comp, 80's Peugeot Vagabond, '74 Raleigh Super Course

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
A decade or three ago, using gas to degrease wouldn't have raised an eyebrow. That is what we were taught as kids to use to clean our chains. Wearing gloves wasn't even something we had heard of. As you can see, attitudes have changed. I see it as sort of a desperation move now.
pfaustus is offline  
Likes For pfaustus:
Old 03-08-21, 02:13 PM
  #40  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 23,748

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 120 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3982 Post(s)
Liked 1,416 Times in 874 Posts
Originally Posted by pfaustus View Post
A decade or three ago, using gas to degrease wouldn't have raised an eyebrow. That is what we were taught as kids to use to clean our chains. Wearing gloves wasn't even something we had heard of. As you can see, attitudes have changed. I see it as sort of a desperation move now.
I started getting my chemistry degree in 1977. Using gasoline to wash parts was frowned on 44 years ago for obvious reasons. It hasn’t changed in since then. It’s was a dumb idea then and it is now.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 03-08-21, 03:40 PM
  #41  
easyupbug 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,585

Bikes: too many sparkly Italians, some sweet Americans and a couple interesting Japanese

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 259 Post(s)
Liked 122 Times in 92 Posts
I was stationed near Fairbanks AK in 1969 and remember as a GI using TCE to clean my Hodaka Super Rat chain and dumping the goop out back of the shop. Then I got stationed in Tucson, AZ and learned about the massive issue with TCE dumped at Davis Monthan AFB polluting the ground water. Today they are still fighting PFAS concentrations and shutting down Tucson water wells. We educate the public slowly.
easyupbug is online now  
Old 03-09-21, 10:56 AM
  #42  
drlogik 
Senior Member
 
drlogik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 1,225

Bikes: '87-ish Pinarello Montello; '89 Nishiki Ariel; '85 Raleigh Wyoming, '16 Wabi Special, '16 Wabi Classic, '14 Kona Cinder Cone

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 458 Post(s)
Liked 86 Times in 61 Posts
+1 Petrol/gasoline, bad, very bad for cleaning purposes.

If you must use a solvent, as has been stated before, kerosene, mineral spirits or even the parts washer "paint cans" sold at auto parts stores are much better and safer. I switched to Orange degreaser for my own use now, although once in a while I still break out the auto parts washer can.

O'Reilly auto parts sells them. Berryman Chem-Dip 96 ounce carb parts cleaner. Comes with a strainer/parts lifter. Gets it ALL off.


--

Last edited by drlogik; 03-09-21 at 11:48 AM.
drlogik is offline  
Old 03-09-21, 11:56 AM
  #43  
64Pete
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: SE Pennsylvania
Posts: 18

Bikes: 6 or 7 Raleighs, a Schwinn, a Bianchi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Just for general info, read the MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet) for the Berryman Carb cleaner in the gallon can.
Nastier than gas I think.
As they say, don't get any on ya!

https://contentinfo.autozone.com/zne...s/en/US/139313

Pete
64Pete is offline  
Old 03-09-21, 12:00 PM
  #44  
drlogik 
Senior Member
 
drlogik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 1,225

Bikes: '87-ish Pinarello Montello; '89 Nishiki Ariel; '85 Raleigh Wyoming, '16 Wabi Special, '16 Wabi Classic, '14 Kona Cinder Cone

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 458 Post(s)
Liked 86 Times in 61 Posts
As they say, don't get any on ya!
Wear nitrile gloves, and yes, it's pretty obnoxious stuff but it does get caked on crud off in a jiffy...and it's self contained. I only use it rarely otherwise it's Orange degreaser.
drlogik is offline  
Old 03-09-21, 02:59 PM
  #45  
Bike Gremlin
Mostly harmless ™
 
Bike Gremlin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Novi Sad
Posts: 4,167

Bikes: Custom made on Scott Speedster frame, Custom made on a 1996. steel MTB frame (all but frame changed at least once in the past 20 years).

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 989 Post(s)
Liked 45 Times in 30 Posts
I grew up in relative scarcity, and had to get by with what's available (getting fuel was like in Mad-Max movies ).
If I had a choice (like I do now): diesel, or mineral spirits are a cheap and very effective alternative.

But I must say that I've used petrol for years. With caution and common sense - I was fine, even as a kid.
I'd even argue it's better at cleaning. Though, again, as many others have said: it would not be my first choice. It is highly flammable and more toxic, hence requires more caution, concentration and common sense.

Love the smell, though!

Bike Gremlin is offline  
Likes For Bike Gremlin:
Old 03-09-21, 09:47 PM
  #46  
conspiratemus1
Used to be Conspiratemus
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Hamilton ON Canada
Posts: 1,494
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 285 Post(s)
Liked 235 Times in 156 Posts
Originally Posted by cbrstar View Post
Lots of Mechanic shops used to use it and there's probably some that still do. In really old timey Watchmaker books they call for using gasoline though it was much more pure back then. And the reason why it is mentioned in those books is that gasoline contains Benzene. In fact Watchmakers used to use pure benzene because it's colorless, smells sweet, and evaporates cleanly off parts. But Benzene is a huge source for causing cancer! It's even in cigarette smoke!


But benzene finds it self in many things that you have probably used without realizing like Liquid Wrench, Elmers Glue, Roundup, WD-40. etc. But just because your cleaner is "Organic" doesn't mean it's safe. Always use PPE and a well ventilated area.
Have to fact-check this.


Benzene is a serious occupational carcinogen and is particularly associated with aplastic anaemia (which typically ends in leukaemia.) Bad stuff. Eliminating benzene from ordinary consumer products that could come in contact with your skin or that could be inhaled would seem like a good idea. I don't know if Liquid Wrench formulation sold in Canada contains benzene -- I've never used it. My understanding is that there are benzene exposure lawsuits related to Liquid Wrench.


Benzene is used as a starting material for many many industrial compounds, and drugs. Including TNT. I wonder how many early organic chemists died of benzene poisoning, probably a lot. Many molecules in our bodies contain benzene rings synthesized from other simpler molecules.

Note that benzine (spelt with an i) is a term used in parts of Europe for gasoline or petrol.


Glyphosate (RoundUp) does not contain benzene. An ambulance-chasing law firm has a website BenzeneLawsuits.com. The firm is litigating glyphosate lawsuits as well, and this may have led to confusion.


Elmer's white glue for wood and paper does not contain benzene or any other poisonous substances. Children use it.. Many cements (like for making styrene plastic models) contain toluene, much loved in the past by adolescent glue-sniffers. Toluene is made from benzene but it is a different chemical. It has its own toxicity, the major one being liver injury and asphyxia when squirted into a plastic sandwich bag for deep inhalation.


WD-40 also does not contain benzene. It is labelled as poisonous on swallowing (due to petroleum distillates) but no warnings about skin contact or carcinogenicity are included on Canadian cans.


Bottom line. Yes, certainly, read labels. If you do find one that really does contain benzene, leave it on the shelf. But benzene is not found in consumer products that we use every day without thinking about it. (Except maybe Liquid Wrench.)


I never use organic solvents for cleaning my own bikes, mostly because I don't want to bother with ventilation and PPEs and the disposal issues. If you have to clean other people's bikes, that's different. A rag and elbow grease, sometimes with soapy water almost always suffice for me. The bits of steel dust and oil that build up on your derailer pulleys can be removed, if they accumulate enough that you think they are doing harm, with a small screwdriver in less time and with less mess than spraying or soaking with solvent. If you need solvents to clean anything, even a chain, you are using too much lube.
conspiratemus1 is offline  
Old 03-09-21, 09:56 PM
  #47  
conspiratemus1
Used to be Conspiratemus
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Hamilton ON Canada
Posts: 1,494
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 285 Post(s)
Liked 235 Times in 156 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
I started getting my chemistry degree in 1977. Using gasoline to wash parts was frowned on 44 years ago for obvious reasons. It hasn’t changed in since then. It’s was a dumb idea then and it is now.
One of my early utterances as a small child, faithfully recorded in my mother's cookbook, was announcing to her that "Grampa uses Esso Escra to get the blossom [balsam, local term for pitch from pine trees] off his hands." Yikes.
conspiratemus1 is offline  
Old 03-10-21, 02:12 AM
  #48  
cbrstar
BMX Connoisseur
 
cbrstar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Canada
Posts: 688

Bikes: 1988 Kuwahara Newport, 1983 Nishiki, 1984 Diamond Back Viper, 1991 Dyno Compe

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 345 Post(s)
Liked 73 Times in 47 Posts
Originally Posted by conspiratemus1 View Post
Have to fact-check this.



Benzene is a serious occupational carcinogen and is particularly associated with aplastic anaemia (which typically ends in leukaemia.) Bad stuff. Eliminating benzene from ordinary consumer products that could come in contact with your skin or that could be inhaled would seem like a good idea. I don't know if Liquid Wrench formulation sold in Canada contains benzene -- I've never used it. My understanding is that there are benzene exposure lawsuits related to Liquid Wrench.



Benzene is used as a starting material for many many industrial compounds, and drugs. Including TNT. I wonder how many early organic chemists died of benzene poisoning, probably a lot. Many molecules in our bodies contain benzene rings synthesized from other simpler molecules.


Note that benzine (spelt with an i) is a term used in parts of Europe for gasoline or petrol.



Glyphosate (RoundUp) does not contain benzene. An ambulance-chasing law firm has a website BenzeneLawsuits.com. The firm is litigating glyphosate lawsuits as well, and this may have led to confusion.



Elmer's white glue for wood and paper does not contain benzene or any other poisonous substances. Children use it.. Many cements (like for making styrene plastic models) contain toluene, much loved in the past by adolescent glue-sniffers. Toluene is made from benzene but it is a different chemical. It has its own toxicity, the major one being liver injury and asphyxia when squirted into a plastic sandwich bag for deep inhalation.



WD-40 also does not contain benzene. It is labelled as poisonous on swallowing (due to petroleum distillates) but no warnings about skin contact or carcinogenicity are included on Canadian cans.



Bottom line. Yes, certainly, read labels. If you do find one that really does contain benzene, leave it on the shelf. But benzene is not found in consumer products that we use every day without thinking about it. (Except maybe Liquid Wrench.)



I never use organic solvents for cleaning my own bikes, mostly because I don't want to bother with ventilation and PPEs and the disposal issues. If you have to clean other people's bikes, that's different. A rag and elbow grease, sometimes with soapy water almost always suffice for me. The bits of steel dust and oil that build up on your derailer pulleys can be removed, if they accumulate enough that you think they are doing harm, with a small screwdriver in less time and with less mess than spraying or soaking with solvent. If you need solvents to clean anything, even a chain, you are using too much lube.

"WD-40 also does not contain benzene. It is labelled as poisonous on swallowing (due to petroleum distillates) but no warnings about skin contact or carcinogenicity are included on Canadian cans."


This is a lawsuit site Benzene – Toxicology Litigation Support – Consultox but it does mention WD-40. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WD-40 the Australian version has benzene
cbrstar is offline  
Old 03-10-21, 09:13 AM
  #49  
conspiratemus1
Used to be Conspiratemus
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Hamilton ON Canada
Posts: 1,494
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 285 Post(s)
Liked 235 Times in 156 Posts
Originally Posted by cbrstar View Post
"WD-40 also does not contain benzene. It is labelled as poisonous on swallowing (due to petroleum distillates) but no warnings about skin contact or carcinogenicity are included on Canadian cans."


This is a lawsuit site Benzene – Toxicology Litigation Support – Consultox but it does mention WD-40. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WD-40 the Australian version has benzene
I didn’t want to get into products used in foreign countries I know nothing about, but since you brought it up, ....
Australian WD-40 as described in that Wikipedia entry contains tri-methyl benzene. That is not benzene, any more than toluene (“methyl benzene”), TNT, or cholesterol are benzene.
conspiratemus1 is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.