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Flying 200s

Old 12-29-19, 05:08 PM
  #126  
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Originally Posted by Super D View Post
I recall seeing a wind-up path discussion here at one point, but can't find it now. Anyone got a link? (Thank you)

My home track is a 333m, and I'm experimenting with different wind-up paths, and would like to learn more about this important aspect.
Hit YouTube and search for some videos. Moscow videos would be a good one as some proper fast guys ride that track
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Old 12-29-19, 08:30 PM
  #127  
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Originally Posted by brawlo View Post
Hit YouTube and search for some videos. Moscow videos would be a good one as some proper fast guys ride that track
Thank you, have also been looking for a 333m track diagram with wind-up lines, measurements, etc, have you ever come across something like that? Iíve seen this for 250m only so far. Iím basically trying to figure out an energy-efficient wind-up with longer than normal drive for a rider who has less peak power but more endurance.
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Old 12-30-19, 12:03 AM
  #128  
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Originally Posted by Clythio View Post
UpUpUp has a good advice for 250m tracks - but its principles can be applied to any place - accumulate potential energy without saturating muscles, making the climb progressive, accelerate to an intermediate speed in advance but keep it fresh for the final acceleration.
Flying 200 ? Up! Up! Up! An introduction to track sprint cycling

More:
https://www.trackcyclingacademy.com/...00m-time-trial

And more..
200m track..
https://analyticcycling.com/Fly200_Page.html
https://analyticcycling.com/genmodel...unExample.html
Good stuff, thank you! Been looking at these over the past few months off and on (not surprisingly, seems there isn't much out there for sprinting), good principles overall just as you said. Very interesting learning about all of this.

Sidenote: I wasn't planning on getting a power meter for track (I've used them for years on road and TT), but now I'm thinking it's probably very useful here, as you can try different wind-ups, entry points, lines, etc and see power, speed and time together retrospectively and see how the guesses for best energy efficiency really played out. I've got an Omnium crank, too bad Stages doesn't make a PM for this.
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Old 12-30-19, 06:01 AM
  #129  
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^you don't want a stages anyways, definitely not for sprinting.
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Old 12-30-19, 11:43 PM
  #130  
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Originally Posted by Morelock View Post
^you don't want a stages anyways, definitely not for sprinting.
Please elaborate, are they problematic? I had stages on my last few road bikes, and a Pioneer on my TT bike, didn't see much difference in terms of accuracy or reliability.
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Old 12-31-19, 05:01 AM
  #131  
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Originally Posted by Super D View Post
Please elaborate, are they problematic? I had stages on my last few road bikes, and a Pioneer on my TT bike, didn't see much difference in terms of accuracy or reliability.
So, I won't cover a full range of issues with stages reliability in data (i think the internet has done a sufficient job over the years) but something a bit more focused to track and sprinting.

In general the problems with track sprinting and power data (and the reason wired SRM's are still used) is "wakeup" and lag. Wakeup applies to your standing starts... the time from when you start applying force to when the power meter actually "wakes up" and decides to start recording. This is very important for timed events but for a sprinter in particular actually not "all" that important outside of a team sprint. Lag on the other hand is very problematic. Say you're winding up for a flying 200... applying constant(ly increasing) power for your wind up laps, which is something the Stages does handle fairly well... then as you start your sprint "proper" you suddenly go to 2-3x (+) the watts as you dive. The power meter takes some amount of time to figure out "oh hey, something different" and in those moments you're going to find the difference between a stages and a more "powerful" power meter.

In very short, violent efforts you need consistent, reliable data, perhaps even moreso than other forms of cycling. Stages do a passably good job for "most" cycling/cyclists... that is, averaging long stretches of relatively consistent power output. (most forms of cycling) The cracks show up in things like track sprinting, bmx, mountain biking where power shifts quickly and violently and often the spikes are so short that the average it spits out is flawed heavily by a misreading.

Somewhere in one of the threads on here (maybe the power meters for track thread) there is a stages rep who responds to some questions a few years back. He point blank says it's not really made for sprinters.
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Old 12-31-19, 08:37 AM
  #132  
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I think Stages is covered here: https://www.bikeforums.net/track-cyc...computers.html

Basically, Stages is designed for long road rides where what happens with one leg can safely be extrapolated to happen with the other...on average. Also, the sampling rate and wake up time are issues with track sprint efforts.

Yes, it's a power meter, but not one that's ideal for for recording Track Sprint efforts. Like when one needs to cut a steak and reach for a butter knife because you used it daily to cut butter and it was good at that.

It will be able to cut the steak. But, it's not the best knife for the job.

Last edited by carleton; 12-31-19 at 08:41 AM.
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Old 12-31-19, 09:04 AM
  #133  
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Originally Posted by Super D View Post
Thank you, have also been looking for a 333m track diagram with wind-up lines, measurements, etc, have you ever come across something like that? Iíve seen this for 250m only so far. Iím basically trying to figure out an energy-efficient wind-up with longer than normal drive for a rider who has less peak power but more endurance.
On a 250, you've got 3.5 laps in a flying 200, which means you go through 7 sets of turns; 5 of them are in your windup and 2 are in the effort. On a 333, you've got 2.5 laps, which means you've got 5: 4 in your windup, 1 is in effort.

In the classic 250 corkscrew, as you're coming out of turn 2 before you get your bell, you're on the pedals, gathering speed, using the exit bank to get back up the 3/4 turn nearly full steam from which to launch your final sprint acceleration from speed.

To do the same thing on a 333, you've got to be at full height in 3/4 before your bell, regain that height in 1/2, and use the full drop-off from turn 2 in your sprint acceleration. This means that you've got 1.5 laps to gain the rail. Personally I'd get most of the way there by turn 2, using a bit of bank coming out of it for speed to get up it in 3/4 before the bell.

But overall, unless you're racing in Moscow, you're dealing with a lot less height and there's a lot more room for flexibility - with fewer turns, too, there are fewer options to tire yourself by gaining altitude only to lose it. Especially if you're a "less peak, more endurance," it seems a very forgiving environment for a flying 200. Just make sure you're at the rail by turn 2 in your bell lap and come down off of it, don't cross that line too high.
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Old 01-01-20, 01:09 AM
  #134  
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Originally Posted by queerpunk View Post
On a 250, you've got 3.5 laps in a flying 200, which means you go through 7 sets of turns; 5 of them are in your windup and 2 are in the effort. On a 333, you've got 2.5 laps, which means you've got 5: 4 in your windup, 1 is in effort.

In the classic 250 corkscrew, as you're coming out of turn 2 before you get your bell, you're on the pedals, gathering speed, using the exit bank to get back up the 3/4 turn nearly full steam from which to launch your final sprint acceleration from speed.

To do the same thing on a 333, you've got to be at full height in 3/4 before your bell, regain that height in 1/2, and use the full drop-off from turn 2 in your sprint acceleration. This means that you've got 1.5 laps to gain the rail. Personally I'd get most of the way there by turn 2, using a bit of bank coming out of it for speed to get up it in 3/4 before the bell.

But overall, unless you're racing in Moscow, you're dealing with a lot less height and there's a lot more room for flexibility - with fewer turns, too, there are fewer options to tire yourself by gaining altitude only to lose it. Especially if you're a "less peak, more endurance," it seems a very forgiving environment for a flying 200. Just make sure you're at the rail by turn 2 in your bell lap and come down off of it, don't cross that line too high.
Thank you, good and helpful summary. Iíve been experimenting a bit with my windup, will report back, maybe get some video. This is fun.
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Old 01-01-20, 02:59 PM
  #135  
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Originally Posted by Super D View Post
Thank you, good and helpful summary. Iíve been experimenting a bit with my windup, will report back, maybe get some video. This is fun.
Testing is the key.

Experiment with different windups like the gradual acceleration or the "rolling standing start" that has not much windup, just a jump from low speed from high on the track.

I've found that the latter works better for me. I found out by analyzing my SRM speed and cadence data from Man1 efforts in Team Sprint. I found that my final 200M of a Man1 effort had the exact same split as a full-windup Flying 200 on the same day using the same gear. Basically, the F200 windup didn't really help me much at all.

This also helped me understand that I has hitting a terminal velocity based on my frontal area. This means that I needed to work on becoming more aero if I wanted to be faster. Getting a smaller position was more important than gaining more strength or power.
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Old 01-03-20, 08:16 AM
  #136  
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Actually with the gears people run these days most people I see going fast start their jump in (or even before) T1 on a 333. And most stay at the rail all the way through 1 and 2 which means you jump and accelerate at the rail for something like 50-60m before you see any help from the banking. This is tricky to get right.

Last edited by Baby Puke; 01-03-20 at 08:17 AM. Reason: *on a 333
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Old 01-04-20, 02:12 PM
  #137  
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Originally Posted by Morelock View Post
So, I won't cover a full range of issues with stages reliability in data (i think the internet has done a sufficient job over the years) but something a bit more focused to track and sprinting.

In general the problems with track sprinting and power data (and the reason wired SRM's are still used) is "wakeup" and lag. Wakeup applies to your standing starts... the time from when you start applying force to when the power meter actually "wakes up" and decides to start recording. This is very important for timed events but for a sprinter in particular actually not "all" that important outside of a team sprint. Lag on the other hand is very problematic. Say you're winding up for a flying 200... applying constant(ly increasing) power for your wind up laps, which is something the Stages does handle fairly well... then as you start your sprint "proper" you suddenly go to 2-3x (+) the watts as you dive. The power meter takes some amount of time to figure out "oh hey, something different" and in those moments you're going to find the difference between a stages and a more "powerful" power meter.

In very short, violent efforts you need consistent, reliable data, perhaps even moreso than other forms of cycling. Stages do a passably good job for "most" cycling/cyclists... that is, averaging long stretches of relatively consistent power output. (most forms of cycling) The cracks show up in things like track sprinting, bmx, mountain biking where power shifts quickly and violently and often the spikes are so short that the average it spits out is flawed heavily by a misreading.

Somewhere in one of the threads on here (maybe the power meters for track thread) there is a stages rep who responds to some questions a few years back. He point blank says it's not really made for sprinters.
I found that thread, interesting discussion. Wonder if there have been any advancements at Stages since. It's a shame, I've had good luck (and service experiences) with Stages on the road bikes. Nice that they're affordable as well. (Granted, accurate is the most important factor, as carleton rightly points out.)

Originally Posted by carleton View Post
I think Stages is covered here: https://www.bikeforums.net/track-cyc...computers.html

Basically, Stages is designed for long road rides where what happens with one leg can safely be extrapolated to happen with the other...on average. Also, the sampling rate and wake up time are issues with track sprint efforts.

Yes, it's a power meter, but not one that's ideal for for recording Track Sprint efforts. Like when one needs to cut a steak and reach for a butter knife because you used it daily to cut butter and it was good at that.

It will be able to cut the steak. But, it's not the best knife for the job.
I planned a circuit road race finish using my power graph with Stages data for 45s and 30s power as a reference a few years ago, and while it wasn't as accurate as an SRM, it, along with analyzing the course shape and elevation changes, contributed to a solid finishing strategy. Not disputing what you've pointed out, rather matching an example of where it was helpful for longer sprint efforts, 400m+, in this case, unusually long. Decent tool for the job in that scenario.

The more I'm learning about gearing and cadence connected to speed objectives, the more I realize that those are my true must-have factors. If I'm not hitting the required cadence in the given gear combo, the speed simply will not be there.
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Old 01-04-20, 03:05 PM
  #138  
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Originally Posted by carleton View Post
Testing is the key.

Experiment with different windups like the gradual acceleration or the "rolling standing start" that has not much windup, just a jump from low speed from high on the track.

I've found that the latter works better for me. I found out by analyzing my SRM speed and cadence data from Man1 efforts in Team Sprint. I found that my final 200M of a Man1 effort had the exact same split as a full-windup Flying 200 on the same day using the same gear. Basically, the F200 windup didn't really help me much at all.

This also helped me understand that I has hitting a terminal velocity based on my frontal area. This means that I needed to work on becoming more aero if I wanted to be faster. Getting a smaller position was more important than gaining more strength or power.
This is pretty fascinating. Aero is so important. Add optimized/maximized energy output in the given gearing from the start line which can be sustained to the finish, and that seems to me the whole equation for each individual.

I've started testing a seated, earlier long drive with higher speed starting from T4 versus a standing, later short drive starting from T1 with a slower roll into it, to see how aero would affect the outcome (of course, the energy used for standing VS seated is also a factor, and it was interesting to see in the seated example an HR of 137bpm at start line to 155 at finish, and for the standing option a 150bmp at start line and 158bmp at finish). The seated version has been marginally faster so far. Guessing, I would attribute this to aero. Both were well under my threshold HR of 170 (that's a TT HR for me, not a true sprint max HR which is more up in the 190-200bpm range from road racing).

Gearing choice is so important here. I'm not built like a sprinter, and not a high cadence spinner, so if I try to rely on power to bring the given gearing up to required cadence with a short ramp-up, I can't see how I wouldn't come up short. My initial approach is to build up the ability to endure a longer ramp-up with higher speed starting at T4 (seated, aero as possible).

I feel like my standing, shorter ramp up around T1 and T2 are not as smooth with tire path. Rocking the bike slightly introduces more rolling resistance, whereas seated, without rocking, the tires are following a more consistent path with most likely lower resistance. That was in my mind while testing, trying to keep the bike stable as can be while out of the saddle.

I've really just begun testing, and with little experience and only basic data, certainly no conclusions yet, just guesses. Tracking the testing results over time, to kick out variance for fitness level, health, recovery time between efforts, etc will also be helpful no doubt.

Originally Posted by Baby Puke View Post
Actually with the gears people run these days most people I see going fast start their jump in (or even before) T1 on a 333. And most stay at the rail all the way through 1 and 2 which means you jump and accelerate at the rail for something like 50-60m before you see any help from the banking. This is tricky to get right.
It really is tricky. I don't like sounding like I'm saying this over and over, but I'm really appreciating more and more how technical sprinting is. So much more than just power. Being a long-lanky guy, I'll have to find ways to make up for lack of brute strength, kind of like learning how to race a momentum car on track versus higher horsepower cars (which I've done, really fun).
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