Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Wheel build advice

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Wheel build advice

Old 01-04-20, 02:29 PM
  #26  
SurferRosa
Senior Member
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 1,627

Bikes: old school 531c & campy

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 715 Post(s)
Liked 309 Times in 206 Posts
Originally Posted by Drillium Dude View Post
... try to get it as close to trued as I can before having the pros at my LBS finish it off.
Which one is your lbs?
SurferRosa is offline  
Old 01-04-20, 03:03 PM
  #27  
repechage
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 14,039
Mentioned: 88 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1199 Post(s)
Liked 228 Times in 179 Posts
Originally Posted by Bianchigirll View Post
If you rebuld then or build new wheels go for 'Crow's Foot' lacing. Very unique


I have seen this done various ways, I think OK on a high flange hub. I am not liking the radial spokes' path on the imaged wheel.
repechage is offline  
Old 01-04-20, 04:39 PM
  #28  
Drillium Dude 
NNNN
Thread Starter
 
Drillium Dude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Bothell, WA
Posts: 10,041

Bikes: 1973 Colnago Super, 1973 Colnago Super concept, 1979 Medici Pro Strada, 1979 Dennis Sparrow, 1980 Alpina, 1981 Bianchi Super Leggera, 1983 Colnago Mexico, 1985 Casati Perfection, 1985 Somec Super Corsa, 2002 Bill Davidson custom

Mentioned: 183 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1405 Post(s)
Liked 474 Times in 280 Posts
Originally Posted by SurferRosa View Post
Which one is your lbs?
Bothell Ski & Bike (which is actually located in Kenmore these days). They have a couple older guys wrenching there that appreciate - and know how to look after - the old stuff.

DD
__________________
My Flickr pics: http://www.flickr.com/photos/30331021@N08/

Drillium Dude is offline  
Likes For Drillium Dude:
Old 01-04-20, 05:00 PM
  #29  
norcalmike
Senior Member
 
norcalmike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Salinas
Posts: 428
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 157 Post(s)
Liked 98 Times in 59 Posts
I've been watching a bunch of YouTube videos on wheel building. It's something I've always wanted to try. I end up with mismatched wheels buying bikes a lot and if I switch things around I can make a couple matching sets for zero dollars. I think it would be fun too.
norcalmike is offline  
Old 01-04-20, 05:19 PM
  #30  
Mad Honk 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Bloomington, IN
Posts: 596

Bikes: Trek 770, Trek 760, Schwinn Peloton, Patelli Professional, Othon Ochsner

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 251 Post(s)
Liked 136 Times in 109 Posts
DD, Too bad you are so far away from me or I would offer you a four hour course on wheel building that would have you proficient in the art. It is not that bad, but there are some basics involved. If wanted contact me by PM and I can talk you through the process by phone. Smiles, MH
Mad Honk is offline  
Likes For Mad Honk:
Old 01-04-20, 06:05 PM
  #31  
Drillium Dude 
NNNN
Thread Starter
 
Drillium Dude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Bothell, WA
Posts: 10,041

Bikes: 1973 Colnago Super, 1973 Colnago Super concept, 1979 Medici Pro Strada, 1979 Dennis Sparrow, 1980 Alpina, 1981 Bianchi Super Leggera, 1983 Colnago Mexico, 1985 Casati Perfection, 1985 Somec Super Corsa, 2002 Bill Davidson custom

Mentioned: 183 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1405 Post(s)
Liked 474 Times in 280 Posts
Originally Posted by Prowler View Post
Here, I'll discourage you. Releasing two at a time to just cross one over the other is not onerous. Replacing two at a time is getting onerous as you have to deal with getting the old spokes out and the new'ens fed in. Remember that the spokes must flow out of the hub holes and across the hub. Then the new'ens fed back in. Not trivial. I had to do several spokes on my Fuji due to rust. Fussy job and I know what I'm doing, used to it, don'it plenty (at home and at LBS).

I vote replacing them all, one at a time, is not a good way to start. Too much frustration and you'll probably scratch the rims a couple times.

However if you want to try a few on a scrap wheel, that would learn ya something. Your LBS may have scrap wheels.
The more I read and talk to people locally, the more it seems the prudent approach would be to leave them be. Well, they still need truing, but not worry about the weaving. This is for my experimentation bike anyway.

DD
__________________
My Flickr pics: http://www.flickr.com/photos/30331021@N08/

Drillium Dude is offline  
Old 01-04-20, 06:08 PM
  #32  
Drillium Dude 
NNNN
Thread Starter
 
Drillium Dude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Bothell, WA
Posts: 10,041

Bikes: 1973 Colnago Super, 1973 Colnago Super concept, 1979 Medici Pro Strada, 1979 Dennis Sparrow, 1980 Alpina, 1981 Bianchi Super Leggera, 1983 Colnago Mexico, 1985 Casati Perfection, 1985 Somec Super Corsa, 2002 Bill Davidson custom

Mentioned: 183 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1405 Post(s)
Liked 474 Times in 280 Posts
Originally Posted by daviddavieboy View Post
I goofed like this on a set before. It was fine on the front but on the rear when standing on a hill I got the occasional spoke rub on the derailleur. The front is still true after 2000+. FWIW I used straight gauge spokes on high flange hubs with Ambrosio Olympic tubular rims.
Because I intend to use this wheelset on big-climbing days, this gives me concern. While I was thinking to leave well enough alone (since many seem to be saying they will be strong enough as-is), it sounds practical to at least weave the driveside spokes to avoid derailleur rub. The climbs I want to ride this on will require going to the basement reliably.

DD
__________________
My Flickr pics: http://www.flickr.com/photos/30331021@N08/

Drillium Dude is offline  
Old 01-05-20, 07:01 AM
  #33  
ironwood
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Boston area
Posts: 1,896

Bikes: 1984 Bridgestone 400 1985Univega nouevo sport 650b conversion 1993b'stone RBT 1985 Schwinn Tempo

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 468 Post(s)
Liked 64 Times in 45 Posts
It's too bad that you feel you're too old to learn new tricks, but it is a useful skill, and isn't that complicated. I think a lot of bike boom bikes were thrown together an assembled rapidly. Your wheel may have been partially machine spoked and not inspected, but it definately would be stronger if the spokes were properly woven.
ironwood is offline  
Old 01-05-20, 07:54 AM
  #34  
jimmuller 
What??? Only 2 wheels?
 
jimmuller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Boston-ish, MA
Posts: 13,194

Bikes: 73 Raleigh Carlton Gran Sport, 72 Peugeot UO-8, 82 Peugeot TH8, 87 Bianchi Brava, 76? Masi Grand Criterium, 87 Centurion Ironman Expert, 74 Motobecane Champion Team, 86 & 77 Gazelle champion mondial, 81? Grandis, 82? Tommasini, 83 Peugeot PFN10

Mentioned: 175 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1108 Post(s)
Liked 72 Times in 55 Posts
DD, first an editorial comment. Wheelbuilding is relaxing but not hard! Worth a sipping beer. Or two.

A few technical observations. Jobst Brandt's book describes the spoke and rim behavior of a wheel in use. The spokes are under elongation from tension. At the bottom where the tire contacts the ground the rim flattens from the pressure. This momentarily shortens the spoke and reduces its tension. This reduction and subsequent restoration of tension causes repeated flexion of the elbow at the flange, eventually leading to fatigue failure. That's where most breaks occur, and usually on spokes at the bottom of rotation, not at the top or around the rest of the rim. So anything you can do to distribute the changes in tension, and therefore changes in displacement, away from the elbow is desired. Thinner multi-gauge spokes last longer because they stretch and shrink more along the length of the spoke rather than concentrating the displacement at the elbow.

When a spoke is laced around another it has some lateral displacement in the middle instead of being a straight line from rim to hub. So when the rim deforms upward the tension of other spoke will pull that portion of the spoke sideways and take up some of the displacement. Essentially it helps maintain a more constant tension in the spoke and reduces the flexion at the elbow. It makes the other spoke shorten a little but better to have two spokes flex a little than each flex more one at a time. So in principle it will make the spoke last longer before it breaks from fatigue.

Inotherwords, your wheel should last longer if it is strung right.

If it was mine I'd change them. I'd go around the rim reducing each spoke little by little until they are all pretty soft. Only then would I loosen each by very much at a time. That way it minimize deforming the rim either laterally or radially. Then I could go around the rim and restring each spoke. Re-tightening them is an exercise you'll need to do, so if you do this you might as well restring with better spokes. If that seems too much, then keep the wheel tensioned so you don't have to do the full re-tightening exercise.
__________________
Real cyclists use toe clips.
With great bikes comes great responsibility.
jimmuller

Last edited by jimmuller; 01-05-20 at 08:12 AM.
jimmuller is offline  
Likes For jimmuller:
Old 01-05-20, 08:06 AM
  #35  
Classtime 
Senior Member
 
Classtime's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,849

Bikes: 81 Medici, 84 Turbo, 86 IM, 2010 Milwaukee Road, 2011 RS

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 677 Post(s)
Liked 78 Times in 60 Posts
DD, it is about time you started tuning/rebuilding your wheels. The bikes that you post are testament to the top shelf handiwork you are capable of. With out the weave, that broken spoke will flop around. But you probably wont break one. I suggest that you put that wheelset on your Casati and use new rims, spokes and nipples on Record hubs to build wheels for your Bianchi. Then you can go back and play with that 4X wheelset.
__________________
I don't do: disks, tubeless, e-shifting, or bead head nymphs.
Classtime is offline  
Likes For Classtime:
Old 01-05-20, 06:37 PM
  #36  
repechage
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 14,039
Mentioned: 88 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1199 Post(s)
Liked 228 Times in 179 Posts
Originally Posted by Drillium Dude View Post
Thanks for that suggestion. Is there a rule of thumb when de-tensioning? I was thinking a couple turns every other spoke until around once, then reverse the order for the skipped spokes.

DD

If I intend to save the rim and or spokes, 1/2 turn per spoke on ONE side at a time. Until loose, I make sure I segregate drive and non drive side spokes on the rear wheel, the drive side should be 1-2 mm shorter on a rear wheel.
FIRST- check the spoke engagement all around the wheel, note with a sharpie spokes that are long, on the spoke and at the rim.
Reason is to check for weird corrections and or non common length spokes.
I have found enough built in errors over the years, to make me wary. Unless I built the wheel.
I am not against reusing rims. Or spokes, not for "Show" bikes but for "training wheels"
I had one set of wheels built with used rim and spoke in front, used rim and cad spokes for the rear, and They would not die. Finally retired them after 40 years. (there was 10 years worth of total storage in that time frame)
Upon reflection, I should have built with stainless steel spokes in the rear wheel. It was corrosion of the spokes that called the end.
Using new nipples wherever possible. The front were Robergel... not a chance there.
repechage is offline  
Likes For repechage:
Old 01-05-20, 11:12 PM
  #37  
desconhecido
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,600
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 317 Post(s)
Liked 29 Times in 24 Posts
Originally Posted by norcalmike View Post
I've been watching a bunch of YouTube videos on wheel building. It's something I've always wanted to try. I end up with mismatched wheels buying bikes a lot and if I switch things around I can make a couple matching sets for zero dollars. I think it would be fun too.
It's a worthwhile exercise, in my opinion, but if you are replacing spokes (going 4x to 2x or replacing galvanized with ss) you will spend some change. Even if not replacing spokes, good rim strips and replacing nipples won't be free, though not very much with used spokes.
desconhecido is offline  
Likes For desconhecido:
Old 01-05-20, 11:28 PM
  #38  
desconhecido
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,600
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 317 Post(s)
Liked 29 Times in 24 Posts
Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
Lots of low-end Raleighs came with wheels built this way. I agree it was likely a labor/cost saving design. While the OP's wheel is probably just fine to ride, I was surprised that non-laced spokes would be used on what appears to be a fairly high-end wheel (Campagnolo Record skewer, sealed bearing hub).
I just went and checked a wheel from a 74 Sprite -- pretty much the same bike as a Record only with upright bars and fenders, and the spokes are not interlaced. Of course, the spokes on the Sports never were either.
desconhecido is offline  
Old 01-05-20, 11:59 PM
  #39  
Drillium Dude 
NNNN
Thread Starter
 
Drillium Dude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Bothell, WA
Posts: 10,041

Bikes: 1973 Colnago Super, 1973 Colnago Super concept, 1979 Medici Pro Strada, 1979 Dennis Sparrow, 1980 Alpina, 1981 Bianchi Super Leggera, 1983 Colnago Mexico, 1985 Casati Perfection, 1985 Somec Super Corsa, 2002 Bill Davidson custom

Mentioned: 183 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1405 Post(s)
Liked 474 Times in 280 Posts
Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
Lots of low-end Raleighs came with wheels built this way. I agree it was likely a labor/cost saving design. While the OP's wheel is probably just fine to ride, I was surprised that non-laced spokes would be used on what appears to be a fairly high-end wheel (Campagnolo Record skewer, sealed bearing hub).
I missed this post, but it answers a lot. One, it does suggest that the wheel is safe and reliable to ride as-is. Two, I was not wrong to be surprised at the lack of lacing; the wheel in question, btw, has early stainless steel barrel/alloy flange Phil Wood hubs and spokes with unmarked heads which are possibly chromed or galvanized - I can't tell what kind of patina it is. Rims are Ambrosio Synthesis Durex Super Professional tubulars. So yeah, the spokes are the only bit that appears somewhat cheap, but they are also hefty and may well have been the answer to the question why they weren't weaved: it was easier, and somewhat cheaper, to do it that way.

I'm going to clean off the old glue myself and have my LBS re-tension both wheels. I took a good look at the wheel in the Casati's rear triangle today during unrelated preparatory maintenance and noticed the dish is out a bit, which makes sense: this wheelset came from the Bianchi which had been off a bit. I'll then tape up the tires and take it for a test ride as soon as I get a dry afternoon.

Kind of in a hurry to try out tubulars again, I guess! But the wheel-building stuff will have to wait just a little while longer, unless the test ride results tell me I need to make changes.

DD
__________________
My Flickr pics: http://www.flickr.com/photos/30331021@N08/

Drillium Dude is offline  
Old 01-06-20, 12:20 AM
  #40  
Last ride 76 
Senior Member
 
Last ride 76's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Just moved...1 km S. Now above the "Bike Path" ( River Road, Piermont, NY)
Posts: 1,383

Bikes: Old Bikes: '74 Ron Cooper, Crashed and repaired '76, restored 2015!!! need restoration '74 Witcomb track bike (bought in '75) '75 Carlsbad Masi, bought in '76 New bikes: 84-85 Gios torino "Professional" '76 Olmo Competition C Titiano

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 322 Post(s)
Liked 120 Times in 101 Posts
Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
Tie and solder
There's an easy middle ground fix!
Last ride 76 is offline  
Old 01-06-20, 12:22 AM
  #41  
mechanicmatt
Hoards Thumbshifters
 
mechanicmatt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Signal Mountain, TN
Posts: 749

Bikes: '87 Bruce Gordon Chinook, '08 Jamis Aurora, '86 Trek 560, '97 Mongoose Rockadile, & '07 Stumpjumper

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 98 Post(s)
Liked 81 Times in 53 Posts
Originally Posted by Drillium Dude View Post
I missed this post, but it answers a lot. One, it does suggest that the wheel is safe and reliable to ride as-is. Two, I was not wrong to be surprised at the lack of lacing; the wheel in question, btw, has early stainless steel barrel/alloy flange Phil Wood hubs and spokes with unmarked heads which are possibly chromed or galvanized - I can't tell what kind of patina it is. Rims are Ambrosio Synthesis Durex Super Professional tubulars. So yeah, the spokes are the only bit that appears somewhat cheap, but they are also hefty and may well have been the answer to the question why they weren't weaved: it was easier, and somewhat cheaper, to do it that way.

I'm going to clean off the old glue myself and have my LBS re-tension both wheels. I took a good look at the wheel in the Casati's rear triangle today during unrelated preparatory maintenance and noticed the dish is out a bit, which makes sense: this wheelset came from the Bianchi which had been off a bit. I'll then tape up the tires and take it for a test ride as soon as I get a dry afternoon.

Kind of in a hurry to try out tubulars again, I guess! But the wheel-building stuff will have to wait just a little while longer, unless the test ride results tell me I need to make changes.

DD
Someone correct me if I'm wrong but a magnet would tell you if they are stainless or not.
mechanicmatt is offline  
Old 01-06-20, 12:28 AM
  #42  
Last ride 76 
Senior Member
 
Last ride 76's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Just moved...1 km S. Now above the "Bike Path" ( River Road, Piermont, NY)
Posts: 1,383

Bikes: Old Bikes: '74 Ron Cooper, Crashed and repaired '76, restored 2015!!! need restoration '74 Witcomb track bike (bought in '75) '75 Carlsbad Masi, bought in '76 New bikes: 84-85 Gios torino "Professional" '76 Olmo Competition C Titiano

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 322 Post(s)
Liked 120 Times in 101 Posts
Originally Posted by repechage View Post
If I intend to save the rim and or spokes, 1/2 turn per spoke on ONE side at a time. Until loose, I make sure I segregate drive and non drive side spokes on the rear wheel, the drive side should be 1-2 mm shorter on a rear wheel.
FIRST- check the spoke engagement all around the wheel, note with a sharpie spokes that are long, on the spoke and at the rim.
Reason is to check for weird corrections and or non common length spokes.
I have found enough built in errors over the years, to make me wary. Unless I built the wheel.
I am not against reusing rims. Or spokes, not for "Show" bikes but for "training wheels"
I had one set of wheels built with used rim and spoke in front, used rim and cad spokes for the rear, and They would not die. Finally retired them after 40 years. (there was 10 years worth of total storage in that time frame)
Upon reflection, I should have built with stainless steel spokes in the rear wheel. It was corrosion of the spokes that called the end.
Using new nipples wherever possible. The front were Robergel... not a chance there.
+1 Absolutely 1/2 turn- same side all the way around and then flip, don't get too hasty. once the tension is off go all the way off one after the other.
Last ride 76 is offline  
Old 01-06-20, 12:34 AM
  #43  
Kuromori
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 497
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 211 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 70 Times in 54 Posts
Originally Posted by mechanicmatt View Post
Someone correct me if I'm wrong but a magnet would tell you if they are stainless or not.
Only kind of. While 304 or 18/8 usually used in stainless spokes is non-magnetic when annealed, when cold worked it is somewhat magnetic, although not as magnetic as a chrome or galvanized spoke.
Kuromori is offline  
Old 01-06-20, 07:23 AM
  #44  
USAZorro
Señor Member
 
USAZorro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Hardy, VA
Posts: 16,491

Bikes: Mostly English - predominantly Raleighs

Mentioned: 53 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 801 Post(s)
Liked 88 Times in 66 Posts
Originally Posted by jimmuller View Post
DD, first an editorial comment. Wheelbuilding is relaxing but not hard! Worth a sipping beer. Or two.

A few technical observations. Jobst Brandt's book describes the spoke and rim behavior of a wheel in use. The spokes are under elongation from tension. At the bottom where the tire contacts the ground the rim flattens from the pressure. This momentarily shortens the spoke and reduces its tension. This reduction and subsequent restoration of tension causes repeated flexion of the elbow at the flange, eventually leading to fatigue failure. That's where most breaks occur, and usually on spokes at the bottom of rotation, not at the top or around the rest of the rim. So anything you can do to distribute the changes in tension, and therefore changes in displacement, away from the elbow is desired. Thinner multi-gauge spokes last longer because they stretch and shrink more along the length of the spoke rather than concentrating the displacement at the elbow.

When a spoke is laced around another it has some lateral displacement in the middle instead of being a straight line from rim to hub. So when the rim deforms upward the tension of other spoke will pull that portion of the spoke sideways and take up some of the displacement. Essentially it helps maintain a more constant tension in the spoke and reduces the flexion at the elbow. It makes the other spoke shorten a little but better to have two spokes flex a little than each flex more one at a time. So in principle it will make the spoke last longer before it breaks from fatigue.

Inotherwords, your wheel should last longer if it is strung right.

If it was mine I'd change them. I'd go around the rim reducing each spoke little by little until they are all pretty soft. Only then would I loosen each by very much at a time. That way it minimize deforming the rim either laterally or radially. Then I could go around the rim and restring each spoke. Re-tightening them is an exercise you'll need to do, so if you do this you might as well restring with better spokes. If that seems too much, then keep the wheel tensioned so you don't have to do the full re-tightening exercise.

Thanks for the very informative explanation of the dynamics. The only thing I see a problematic is the reference to new spokes. I have built enough wheels to know the horrors of trying to lace spokes with their heads on the outside of the hub while the spokes that have their heads on the inside are present. This can quickly lead to scratched rims, frustration, swearing and drinking while trying to make this take place.

If going the route of relacing the wheel with new spokes, I advise reducing the tension to just about zero, removing all the spokes with their heads on the inside of the hub, and then set about to replacing them one at a time.
__________________
In search of what to search for.
USAZorro is offline  
Old 01-06-20, 01:13 PM
  #45  
ThermionicScott 
7-speed cultist
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 19,775

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers)

Mentioned: 83 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2627 Post(s)
Liked 507 Times in 365 Posts
My English 3-speed didn't have interlaced spokes, and that's a bike that's been ridden since the Beatles appeared on Ed Sullivan. Lots of bikes throughout history were made that way, and I think the merits of interlaced spokes may be overstated by those of us who obsess about best practices.

Helping the rear derailleur cage clear the spokes is one solid argument for doing it on rear wheels. But arguments for wheel strength involve the boundary condition where spokes are momentarily losing ALL their tension. That just shouldn't happen (well, hardly ever) on a wheel with proper tension.

If you do decide to interlace the spokes, I will contradict most of the advice here. I would NOT completely loosen the wheels first. Just do it one spoke at a time -- loosen the crossing spoke completely, lace it through, pull it back up to tension. You'll know it's right when that spot come back into true with the rest of the wheel.
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498
ThermionicScott is online now  
Likes For ThermionicScott:
Old 01-06-20, 01:28 PM
  #46  
Kuromori
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 497
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 211 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 70 Times in 54 Posts
3 speeds have the advantage of not having dish. Derailer equipped bicycles, especially later ones that are less C&V have the unfortunate problem of not having proper tension on the rear NDS except when there's some asymmetry like 2:1 lacing or offset rims to compensate.
Kuromori is offline  
Old 01-06-20, 01:34 PM
  #47  
79pmooney
A Roadie Forever
 
79pmooney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 7,526

Bikes: (2) ti TiCycles, 2007 w/ triple and 2011 fixed, 1979 Peter Mooney, ~1983 Trek 420 now fixed and ~1973 Raleigh Carlton Competition gravel grinder

Mentioned: 97 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1908 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 281 Times in 206 Posts
I'd de-tension the rim and cross the spokes. De-tensioned enough, the order you do the crosses in won't matter. But ... this is a full wheel build except for the seating of the spokes and thist is a nice wheel. I'd do my learning elsewhere.

Wheel building is a great skill. I"m surprised you haven't mastered it yet. Grab a hub and rim, go to a calculator or trusted bike shop, get the right length spokes and build your first. Do another. (It gets more fun every wheel.) Then take this one on. And you'll find this is much easier than new spokes you have to bend and seat.

Now, you could buy new, lighter, double butted spokes. That wold be a full build. But, you have the lengths you need already done for you, Hub flange holes are seated. Spoke directions are defined. End result would be a really sweet wheel.

Too old to learn - naw! Just do it!

Ben
79pmooney is online now  
Old 01-07-20, 05:16 PM
  #48  
Drillium Dude 
NNNN
Thread Starter
 
Drillium Dude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Bothell, WA
Posts: 10,041

Bikes: 1973 Colnago Super, 1973 Colnago Super concept, 1979 Medici Pro Strada, 1979 Dennis Sparrow, 1980 Alpina, 1981 Bianchi Super Leggera, 1983 Colnago Mexico, 1985 Casati Perfection, 1985 Somec Super Corsa, 2002 Bill Davidson custom

Mentioned: 183 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1405 Post(s)
Liked 474 Times in 280 Posts
Originally Posted by desconhecido View Post
It's a worthwhile exercise, in my opinion, but if you are replacing spokes (going 4x to 2x or replacing galvanized with ss) you will spend some change. Even if not replacing spokes, good rim strips and replacing nipples won't be free, though not very much with used spokes.
And this is why I will wait to do my first wheel-build another time. If this wheelset is generally understood to be fine, if a little aesthetically lacking, I would rather leave it alone and just ride it - but not invest in new spokes, nipples, perhaps have to unlace the entire wheel...no.

It sure is funny the way threads seem to go way out into left field in the winter months! All I wanted to know at the outset of this thread was whether or not the wheels were safe to ride without the weave

DD
__________________
My Flickr pics: http://www.flickr.com/photos/30331021@N08/

Drillium Dude is offline  
Old 01-07-20, 05:27 PM
  #49  
Mad Honk 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Bloomington, IN
Posts: 596

Bikes: Trek 770, Trek 760, Schwinn Peloton, Patelli Professional, Othon Ochsner

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 251 Post(s)
Liked 136 Times in 109 Posts
Originally Posted by Mad Honk View Post
Drillium Dude,
Why mess with something that is working? Lacing on wheels is kind of over-rated, just like is it three or four cross? The lacing thing does very little in the bigger picture of tensions to hub and rim. I build my wheels differently than Jobst-Brant, but they have withstood Race Across America just fine. JMHO, MH
Bump
Mad Honk is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.