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Hour and 15 minute training rides for basic fitness

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Hour and 15 minute training rides for basic fitness

Old 07-30-20, 09:20 PM
  #26  
CyclingBK
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Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
Technically, this is known as "speed work." I've done these in final prep for a little extra strength on the flat, after doing a lot of FTP and climbing work I can make no sense of the T-Max interval recommendation.
Thats amazing you take that on after so much work.

For me, I do 30 minutes progressive warm up.

Then, per the quote/article I posted,

Flat out/*alls to the wall for 1 minute so Iím blasted and practically canít even pedal for a bit, then easy pedal, then that ďbigĒ hill I grind out but donít go crazy on.

Gather some steam for minute. Then, another flat out minute. Gather for a few, then establish a cadence,

Then Repeat the period above.

So, really, Iím just doing 4 flat out minute intervals wit about 6-8 minutes of easy pedaling, and another 12 minutes of sustained effort mixed in.

Then, my final stint is about 10 minutes of pushing as big a gear as I can as at fast a reasonable, sustained, cadence as I can, then couple minutes cool down.

The biggest issue right now is the heat. Itís 90 degrees and 65-70 dew point and Iím just not interested in riding in that.

So, been hitting some 45 minute kick boxing workouts for the past 2 weeks every other day, strength training on the other days.

i feel good. The kickboxing is great because thereís a lot of lateral motion and upper body action. But I can tell Iím losing some riding power.

One day maybe Iíll endeavor to understand cycling from the perspective that you guys do. But for now, thatís a long way off. Nonetheless, you guys sharing your knowledge is much appreciated and very motivating ; )

Last edited by CyclingBK; 07-30-20 at 09:41 PM.
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Old 07-31-20, 05:07 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
Not really. Zone boundaries as commonly defined by various authorities intentionally don't fall on AeT or AnT (VT1 and VT2). That's a reason that coach advice is, when trying to ride in a a particular zone, not to ride at the upper end of it. Both those zone boundaries are best measured by breathing rather than HR. After one get the feel of them by breathing, it is possible to develop fairly but not entirely reliable HR measures for those boundaries.

AeT is the point where one's deep breathing rate rather suddenly accelerates. You have to breathe faster. AnT is the point where one begins panting, deep breathing no longer being possible. There was a guy on here a while back who rode with a blood lactate meter and would stop and do a test to be absolutely sure of where he was. He was trying to do a lot of riding below AeT.
I tried to listen to my breathing today and look at pulse and increase wattage every 20 minutes. VT1 is definitely somewhere in Zone 2 for me. 63% of FTP which I guess is right in the middle I definitely still had a low pulse and could talk easily. No issue at all, easy. 66% pulse was higher of course but still comfortably in zone 2 for pulse, and I could still talk easily and breathing was not labored at all yet. I would say at about 70% FTP my pulse was starting to edge towards zone 3 for pulse and breathing was getting heavier though I could still talk without having to gasp in between words. 74% was most likely above it. Though of course I was increasing the wattage all the time, so by the time I got to 70% I had gone 80 minutes already and 2 hours for 74% and it was getting warmer and warmer.
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Old 07-31-20, 12:19 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by ZHVelo View Post
I tried to listen to my breathing today and look at pulse and increase wattage every 20 minutes. VT1 is definitely somewhere in Zone 2 for me. 63% of FTP which I guess is right in the middle I definitely still had a low pulse and could talk easily. No issue at all, easy. 66% pulse was higher of course but still comfortably in zone 2 for pulse, and I could still talk easily and breathing was not labored at all yet. I would say at about 70% FTP my pulse was starting to edge towards zone 3 for pulse and breathing was getting heavier though I could still talk without having to gasp in between words. 74% was most likely above it. Though of course I was increasing the wattage all the time, so by the time I got to 70% I had gone 80 minutes already and 2 hours for 74% and it was getting warmer and warmer.
My upper limit is 70%, though I try to ride just below that when I do AeT rides. But I suppose everyone's different. I notice the change when I definitely feel that I need to breathe faster. A common test for being below AeT is to recite the alphabet at a normal speaking rate in one breath.
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Old 08-01-20, 04:47 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by CyclingBK View Post
So, been hitting some 45 minute kick boxing workouts for the past 2 weeks every other day, strength training on the other days.

i feel good. The kickboxing is great because there’s a lot of lateral motion and upper body action. But I can tell I’m losing some riding power.
Pro cyclists have minimal upperbody mass. Very petite on the upper body and arms (they WON'T be turning heads on the beach I tell you that!). They only workout the leg muscles, cardio, flexibility, and core muscles.

Big muscular arms and heavy upperbody is only deadweight to pro cyclists since only the leg muscles first and foremost and core muscles are used in cycling (mostly). You only need to have arms strong enough to support yourself while standing on the pedals (off the saddle) and employing them to leverage pedaling while standing during sprints or steep uphill sections and to keep yourself from flying over the handlbar while braking hard. And you don't need to have strong arms for those.

The closer you get to Pro cyclist physique, the better your peformance will be. Whole lot of science behind it.

Definitely not a head turner on the beach!
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Old 08-01-20, 06:23 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by cubewheels View Post
Pro cyclists have minimal upperbody mass. Very petite on the upper body and arms (they WON'T be turning heads on the beach I tell you that!). They only workout the leg muscles, cardio, flexibility, and core muscles.

Big muscular arms and heavy upperbody is only deadweight to pro cyclists since only the leg muscles first and foremost and core muscles are used in cycling (mostly). You only need to have arms strong enough to support yourself while standing on the pedals (off the saddle) and employing them to leverage pedaling while standing during sprints or steep uphill sections and to keep yourself from flying over the handlbar while braking hard. And you don't need to have strong arms for those.

The closer you get to Pro cyclist physique, the better your peformance will be. Whole lot of science behind it.

Definitely not a head turner on the beach!

Yes, and it makes sense they wouldnít expend time and much energy on anything that wouldnít yield results for their sport.

There was this cool documentary on Amazon Prime called Moon Rider that followed Rasmus Quaade. Showed the insane dedication and training these guys do. At one point the coach doesnít even want the cyclists walking any more than absolutely necessary. Like even walking a few steps within the training camp!

I like these cardio workouts that incorporate moving laterally with speed and in all different ďplanesĒ since cycling is strictly moving linear and pretty much a completely repetitive motion.
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Old 08-01-20, 06:46 AM
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Originally Posted by CyclingBK View Post
Yes, and it makes sense they wouldn’t expend time and much energy on anything that wouldn’t yield results for their sport.

There was this cool documentary on Amazon Prime called Moon Rider that followed Rasmus Quaade. Showed the insane dedication and training these guys do. At one point the coach doesn’t even want the cyclists walking any more than absolutely necessary. Like even walking a few steps within the training camp!

I like these cardio workouts that incorporate moving laterally with speed and in all different “planes” since cycling is strictly moving linear and pretty much a completely repetitive motion.
Cool one! Yes, walking uses different muscles than cycling.

Pro cycling don't want you growing muscles you don't need (or more than you'll need to train). It's basically weight added to your body that doesn't improve your performance on the bike and worse since it's added weight, will slow you down a bit in accelerations and climbing uphill.
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Old 08-01-20, 06:52 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by cubewheels View Post
Pro cyclists have minimal upperbody mass. Very petite on the upper body and arms (they WON'T be turning heads on the beach I tell you that!). They only workout the leg muscles, cardio, flexibility, and core muscles.


Big muscular arms and heavy upperbody is only deadweight to pro cyclists since only the leg muscles first and foremost and core muscles are used in cycling (mostly). You only need to have arms strong enough to support yourself while standing on the pedals (off the saddle) and employing them to leverage pedaling while standing during sprints or steep uphill sections and to keep yourself from flying over the handlbar while braking hard. And you don't need to have strong arms for those.


The closer you get to Pro cyclist physique, the better your peformance will be. Whole lot of science behind it.


Definitely not a head turner on the beach!


Building muscle and strength has nothing to do with looking good on the beach, at least not for me,... There are many health benefits and practical benefits associated with strength training. As we get older we loose lean muscle tissue which can lead to sarcopenia, that's why it's extremely important to lift weights and do strength training especially as we get older.

I am not a pro cyclists and have no desire to be one or look like one. What's the point of only being fit on a bike and useless in everything else ??...Cross training is important not only for maintaining overall fitness but it's also fun and makes life more interesting and there are many functional benefits associated with cross training, it can even improve your cycling if programmed correctly. OP is doing the right thing....Not all cyclists are skinny and petite, have you seen some of the track sprinters and how muscular they are ??Ö.I can tell you for sure it's not all dead weight, it's functional.

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Old 08-01-20, 08:24 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by CyclingBK View Post
At one point the coach doesnít even want the cyclists walking any more than absolutely necessary. Like even walking a few steps within the training camp!
Way too restrictive for my liking , I can't imagine living a lifestyle that limits me to doing only one thing...and for what ??..just to pump out few extra watts ??

Originally Posted by CyclingBK View Post
I like these cardio workouts that incorporate moving laterally with speed and in all different ďplanesĒ since cycling is strictly moving linear and pretty much a completely repetitive motion.
You're doing the right thing, keep doing what you're doing...My own training also involves doing all kinds of different things that allow me to train the whole body in many different ways.
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Old 08-01-20, 08:45 AM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
Way too restrictive for my liking , I can't imagine living a lifestyle that limits me to doing only one thing...and for what ??..just to pump out few extra watts ??



You're doing the right thing, keep doing what you're doing...My own training also involves doing all kinds of different things that allow me to train the whole body in many different ways.
Thank you, I tried to make the distinction in the subject by saying, ďfor basics fitnessĒ since relative to the training that more serious cyclists engage in, Iím clearly not in that arena.

Even doing and hour and fifteen minutes on the bike is far more cardio than I thought I would ever do. I was miserable going ďgym cardioĒ. Step machine, treadmill, Iíd get so bored in 30 minutes.

So, itís a huge win to have a low impact but high intensity workout on the bike.

From what I gather, a big goal of getting to being a ďlegitĒ cyclist is getting to 20mph for over 20 miles. I think that requires a very strong commitment for most beginners. You need to do over 100 miles a week and ideally have some training plans and gear to measure power etc.

Maybe one day, but for now, I am happy to get over 60 miles a week and feel like I got a nice workout in.

But Iím also interested in, as you say, in the benefits of all around athleticism. How many wide grip pull-ups I can do. Doing Bulgarian Split Squats with a weighted vest. How fast can I move not just forward but side to side and do movements the require complete upper and lower body pivoting and coordination. And, yeah, Some muscle mass is a great thing to have and progressive resistance training is very satisfying. Amazing for your joint health as well.

This is a fantastic forum and I really welcome all the views and guidance and encouragement from the members.
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Old 08-01-20, 09:07 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
Way too restrictive for my liking , I can't imagine living a lifestyle that limits me to doing only one thing...and for what ??..just to pump out few extra watts ??
Not exactly for extra watts but to maintain power output at less body weight and also less "fuel" demand. To improve power to weight ratio and "fuel" efficiency so to speak.

Damn, I'd rather be in PRO racing and have walking restrictions than my 1hr riding limit! When you like cycling so much!

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Old 08-02-20, 02:32 PM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by Drew Eckhardt View Post

Figure out your aerobic (AeT, VT1) and anaerobic (AnT, Critical Power, FTP, LT4, LTHR, VT2) thresholds.

One day a week, ride 7–10 minute intervals as hard as possible, stopping when you can’t exceed your anaerobic threshold. Stephen Seiler’s research into polarized training with Olympic and other endurance athletes is very relevant.
It's really not that relevant. Hardly any cyclists actually train like that, and trying to train like that, especially with limited time, means eschewing that time in between AeT and AnT that delivers the most bang-for-the-buck work possible (which actually pushes AeT up!)


Otherwise riding between the two thresholds won’t do much for speed once you have a bit of fitness - it engages your fast twitch fibers and glycolytic energy system so you’re no longer stressing your aerobic fitness to force improvement, is not hard enough to stress your anaerobic fitness, and adds more fatigue than riding with lower effort.
In the words of one of the most prolific master's racers in the country (with multiple national championships and records), riding in between those two thresholds is "the **** that will kill them". He'd do it five days a week during the winter...


Your aerobic threshold is where breathing becomes rhythmic, conversation doesn't flow, and lactate/hydrogen ions start to accumulate. It's an intensity you could sustain for 3-5 hours with an even split between halves.

Mark Allen set his 2:40 Ironman marathon split record which stood for twenty-five years after training below his aerobic threshold, initially dropping his pace to 8:15 miles with performance improving over a year to 5:20 at the same 155 bpm heart rate.

Not coincidentally, the aerobic threshold heart rate is often close to that predicted by Phil Maffetone’s formula. He coached Mark Allen.
Elite marathoners (those of the sub 2:06 variety) focus on increasing AeT to as close as possible to AnT, specifically due to fuel consumption needs. This isn't done by running heinously slow, but by extending the duration of running very fast. Renato Canova has detailed this really well in various posts on letsrun.


With a decent aerobic base, you can probably manage up to 4 hours riding without food which is a half a pound of fat. Eating 1/3 of your energy on long rides can be sufficient, with a 200 mile ride using up a pound. Accounting for metabolic efficiency, assume 1 kilojoule out is 1 kcal in.
Only riding at a snail's pace. 277 watts ~ 1 megajoule an hour. Burning 1750 calories in four hours is around a 139 watt average. That's like 13-15 mph for people 170 lbs+.

If you plan on fleeing for your life or something with little to no available food consumption, such training may be useful.

Otherwise, doing the opposite works pretty well. I worked up to 3 hours of 90% AnT by specifically targeting work in between AeT and AnT. Absolutely monster fitness after doing that. Could ride fast all day long, seemingly. But yes, I needed food. Riding fast (the point for many people doing structured training) requires calories.
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Old 08-02-20, 08:21 PM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by rubiksoval View Post
It's really not that relevant. Hardly any cyclists actually train like that, and trying to train like that, especially with limited time, means eschewing that time in between AeT and AnT that delivers the most bang-for-the-buck work possible (which actually pushes AeT up!)

In the words of one of the most prolific master's racers in the country (with multiple national championships and records), riding in between those two thresholds is "the **** that will kill them". He'd do it five days a week during the winter...

Elite marathoners (those of the sub 2:06 variety) focus on increasing AeT to as close as possible to AnT, specifically due to fuel consumption needs. This isn't done by running heinously slow, but by extending the duration of running very fast. Renato Canova has detailed this really well in various posts on letsrun.

Only riding at a snail's pace. 277 watts ~ 1 megajoule an hour. Burning 1750 calories in four hours is around a 139 watt average. That's like 13-15 mph for people 170 lbs+.

If you plan on fleeing for your life or something with little to no available food consumption, such training may be useful.

Otherwise, doing the opposite works pretty well. I worked up to 3 hours of 90% AnT by specifically targeting work in between AeT and AnT. Absolutely monster fitness after doing that. Could ride fast all day long, seemingly. But yes, I needed food. Riding fast (the point for many people doing structured training) requires calories.
That's basically how I train with my very limited 1 hr daily riding window.

Ironically, if I take it easy for one day and take it hard again the next day, I'll feel pain. Hard training 7 days a week, no intervals, is what works for me.
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Old 08-03-20, 05:05 AM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by cubewheels View Post
That's basically how I train with my very limited 1 hr daily riding window.

Ironically, if I take it easy for one day and take it hard again the next day, I'll feel pain. Hard training 7 days a week, no intervals, is what works for me.
That's pretty much the opposite of what I said.

What you're doing is not sustainable training in any way.
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Old 08-03-20, 06:16 AM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by rubiksoval View Post
That's pretty much the opposite of what I said.

What you're doing is not sustainable training in any way.
Structured workout plans used to work really well for me but my muscles have adapted and now healing completely in just 12 hours even if was in a lot of pain for few hours after the ride.

I'm simply taking advantage of the changes. My biggest improvement are in uphills. Seeing daily increase in climbing speeds, particulary in long uphills.
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Old 08-03-20, 10:10 AM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by rubiksoval View Post
It's really not that relevant. Hardly any cyclists actually train like that, and trying to train like that, especially with limited time, means eschewing that time in between AeT and AnT that delivers the most bang-for-the-buck work possible (which actually pushes AeT up!)



In the words of one of the most prolific master's racers in the country (with multiple national championships and records), riding in between those two thresholds is "the **** that will kill them". He'd do it five days a week during the winter...



Elite marathoners (those of the sub 2:06 variety) focus on increasing AeT to as close as possible to AnT, specifically due to fuel consumption needs. This isn't done by running heinously slow, but by extending the duration of running very fast. Renato Canova has detailed this really well in various posts on letsrun.



Only riding at a snail's pace. 277 watts ~ 1 megajoule an hour. Burning 1750 calories in four hours is around a 139 watt average. That's like 13-15 mph for people 170 lbs+.

If you plan on fleeing for your life or something with little to no available food consumption, such training may be useful.

Otherwise, doing the opposite works pretty well. I worked up to 3 hours of 90% AnT by specifically targeting work in between AeT and AnT. Absolutely monster fitness after doing that. Could ride fast all day long, seemingly. But yes, I needed food. Riding fast (the point for many people doing structured training) requires calories.
Iím the OP. I appreciate your insight and, while I have a long way to go to understand it all, Iíd like to ask what you think of this type of workout (summary below) in the context of someone who has been: cycling for one year, has 1.25-1.5 hours to train every other day, is balancing cycling as a primary component of cardio work in an overall fitness plan that values both strength training and cardio.

Workout summary with a pic of the loop I ride below:

15 minutes of warmup to establish cadence and loosen up.

15 minutes of 60-80% effort to warm up even more.

15 minutes of: 3 minutes easy pedaling followed by: 1 minute maxed out to aerobic ďfailureĒ, 1 minute total easy pedaling, 5 minutes at 60-75% including the hill in the graphic below, 30 second easy pedaling, 1 minute maxed out to ďfailureĒ, 5 minutes moderate effort.

15 minutes repeat of the 15 minutes above

10 minutes of 70-80% effort

5 minutes easy pedaling.

If you could let me know if you think itís good, or not bad but could use improvement, or if it should be majorly changed up. Iíd appreciate it.

Here is the loop:



Last edited by CyclingBK; 08-03-20 at 11:01 AM.
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Old 08-03-20, 11:41 AM
  #41  
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I will let Rubik comment on your question to him. My observation is that you have way too much warmup.

Let me explain. Old school conventional wisdom coupled with dogma had sprinters warming up forever. They would go out an roll around and then slowly increase their effort maybe for an hour. The theory was the shorter the race effort, the longer the warmup. Endurance riders, warmed up long and went faster for more of the time.

When I started sprint training, my coach gave me a protocol that lasted 12 minutes on the rollers. I was to sit around for 20 minutes with my legs covered and then race.

I am in my 7th decade and my legs would not feel great at the end of the warmup and my brain wanted more. It was all mental. 12 minutes is plenty of time to get all the systems operational. The goal is to show up at the starting line with fresh legs versus fatigued legs from too much warmup. This was the protocol that the British track team used for their sprinters. They turned dogma and legacy upside down. The Brits had the hot pants that they sat around in prior to racing.

So with a limited amount of time, you are spending 30 minutes for warmup and 5 minutes for cool down.

I would limit the warmup to 15 minutes and embed in the routine a couple of 10 second accelerations and one max effort seated start. Now you have the aerobic, glycolytic and ATP PC systems warmed up and primed.

IMO, the 1’ efforts roll around and then another are not that effective for you current situation. I think VO2 work after the warmup done in sets with rest between efforts and rest between sets for the entire period would give you more bang for the time slot. Then on other days you can do an hour of power with sprints every 10 minutes with power set at 85 -90%

You can do 1’ efforts on a particular day but do like 8 of them and that is the workout.

You have framed this thread about fitness. So just riding your bike doing whatever fancies you will generate fitness. If you do it consistently, coupled with your gym work, you will be in great shape. However, as soon as the discussion gets more granular and how is this workout compared to another, then the long knives can come out and start to slice up different protocols and debate what is best.

Last edited by Hermes; 08-03-20 at 11:46 AM.
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Old 08-03-20, 12:47 PM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by Hermes View Post
I will let Rubik comment on your question to him. My observation is that you have way too much warmup.

Let me explain. Old school conventional wisdom coupled with dogma had sprinters warming up forever. They would go out an roll around and then slowly increase their effort maybe for an hour. The theory was the shorter the race effort, the longer the warmup. Endurance riders, warmed up long and went faster for more of the time.

When I started sprint training, my coach gave me a protocol that lasted 12 minutes on the rollers. I was to sit around for 20 minutes with my legs covered and then race.

I am in my 7th decade and my legs would not feel great at the end of the warmup and my brain wanted more. It was all mental. 12 minutes is plenty of time to get all the systems operational. The goal is to show up at the starting line with fresh legs versus fatigued legs from too much warmup. This was the protocol that the British track team used for their sprinters. They turned dogma and legacy upside down. The Brits had the hot pants that they sat around in prior to racing.

So with a limited amount of time, you are spending 30 minutes for warmup and 5 minutes for cool down.

I would limit the warmup to 15 minutes and embed in the routine a couple of 10 second accelerations and one max effort seated start. Now you have the aerobic, glycolytic and ATP PC systems warmed up and primed.

IMO, the 1í efforts roll around and then another are not that effective for you current situation. I think VO2 work after the warmup done in sets with rest between efforts and rest between sets for the entire period would give you more bang for the time slot. Then on other days you can do an hour of power with sprints every 10 minutes with power set at 85 -90%

You can do 1í efforts on a particular day but do like 8 of them and that is the workout.

You have framed this thread about fitness. So just riding your bike doing whatever fancies you will generate fitness. If you do it consistently, coupled with your gym work, you will be in great shape. However, as soon as the discussion gets more granular and how is this workout compared to another, then the long knives can come out and start to slice up different protocols and debate what is best.
This is exactly what I was looking for, thank you. My thanks to the other knowledgeable members as well, but honestly, I couldnít grasp the terminology and you laid it out in more laymanís language.

Alas..it sounds like I need to step it up and really get in gear (no pun intended ; )

Yes, warm up more seriously and do real interval sets as you describe. That actually sounds like a cool workout, thanks.

Ok, Iím going to kick it up a notch. I was probably getting in the mood to switch things up and feel like Iím ready.

Iíll still do that workout I described here and there because itís enjoyable. But, as you say, time is limited so why not make the most of it.

Last edited by CyclingBK; 08-03-20 at 12:53 PM.
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Old 08-03-20, 06:13 PM
  #43  
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You are welcome. Here is a link to the bike forum racing forum workout recipe stickie. https://www.bikeforums.net/33-road-b...cipe-book.html. You may get some ideas for workouts from there.
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Old 08-03-20, 07:43 PM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by cubewheels View Post
Structured workout plans used to work really well for me but my muscles have adapted and now healing completely in just 12 hours even if was in a lot of pain for few hours after the ride.

I'm simply taking advantage of the changes. My biggest improvement are in uphills. Seeing daily increase in climbing speeds, particulary in long uphills.
That still has absolutely nothing to do with my post which was about training in between AeT and AnT.

And say what you want now, but you can't go as hard as you can every day for very long.
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Old 08-03-20, 07:51 PM
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Originally Posted by CyclingBK View Post
I’m the OP. I appreciate your insight and, while I have a long way to go to understand it all, I’d like to ask what you think of this type of workout (summary below) in the context of someone who has been: cycling for one year, has 1.25-1.5 hours to train every other day, is balancing cycling as a primary component of cardio work in an overall fitness plan that values both strength training and cardio.

Workout summary with a pic of the loop I ride below:

15 minutes of warmup to establish cadence and loosen up.

15 minutes of 60-80% effort to warm up even more.

15 minutes of: 3 minutes easy pedaling followed by: 1 minute maxed out to aerobic “failure”, 1 minute total easy pedaling, 5 minutes at 60-75% including the hill in the graphic below, 30 second easy pedaling, 1 minute maxed out to “failure”, 5 minutes moderate effort.

15 minutes repeat of the 15 minutes above

10 minutes of 70-80% effort

5 minutes easy pedaling.

If you could let me know if you think it’s good, or not bad but could use improvement, or if it should be majorly changed up. I’d appreciate it.

Everyone eventually figures out what works for them, but I prescribe to the simple but effective maxim.

My 45 minute ride today consisted of 7 mins of gradually increasing power, 36 minutes of sweet spot (about ~90% AnT/FTP power), 2 mins spin to the driveway. That was 709 kJ and 60 TSS, so decent enough bang for the buck for 45 minutes time, and something I can do multiple times a week. I've found it builds really good all-around fitness.

That's effective for me. I very rarely do random short duration hard/easy efforts like you describe. Especially without a powermeter, your 1 min efforts are likely starting out way too high and ending way too low, so I don't think they're a particularly efficient way to build fitness.
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Old 08-03-20, 08:19 PM
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Originally Posted by rubiksoval View Post
Everyone eventually figures out what works for them, but I prescribe to the simple but effective maxim.

My 45 minute ride today consisted of 7 mins of gradually increasing power, 36 minutes of sweet spot (about ~90% AnT/FTP power), 2 mins spin to the driveway. That was 709 kJ and 60 TSS, so decent enough bang for the buck for 45 minutes time, and something I can do multiple times a week. I've found it builds really good all-around fitness.

That's effective for me. I very rarely do random short duration hard/easy efforts like you describe. Especially without a powermeter, your 1 min efforts are likely starting out way too high and ending way too low, so I don't think they're a particularly efficient way to build fitness.
Thanks for sharing this, looks very cool, Ill try it as best I can measure and can hold out at that effort level.

As far as my 1min efforts. Itís pretty easy to gauge the progression in effort by just starting in a lower cadence at the beginning of a sprint, working to peak cadence, and then sustaining it to the finish.

Id also contend that my resting heart rate dropping from 65+ to under 50 is a clear indication of improved fitness. Along with progressing steadily to bigger gears as I increase cadence in each gear.

This said, Iím here to learn, thereís clearly a wealth of knowledge to take advantage of and I appreciate the guidance.

Last edited by CyclingBK; 08-04-20 at 07:00 AM.
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Old 08-03-20, 08:39 PM
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Originally Posted by rubiksoval View Post
And say what you want now, but you can't go as hard as you can every day for very long.
My speed of recovery keeps on improving which helps me make progress under a harsh training regime. It becomes easier to be fresh the next day to push a little harder than before. That's without using any meds nor any painkillers. I'm simply eating more meat than usual.

Won't work for everybody of course.
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Old 08-04-20, 09:19 AM
  #48  
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Originally Posted by cubewheels View Post
My speed of recovery keeps on improving which helps me make progress under a harsh training regime. It becomes easier to be fresh the next day to push a little harder than before. That's without using any meds nor any painkillers. I'm simply eating more meat than usual.

Won't work for everybody of course.
Won't work for you, either. You just don't understand that, yet.
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Old 08-04-20, 11:26 AM
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Old 08-04-20, 09:29 PM
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Originally Posted by rubiksoval View Post
Won't work for you, either. You just don't understand that, yet.
I feel great, no pain anywhere, no cardio issues, muscles are fresh every morning in the last 3 weeks, and made a huge improvement in cardio fitness and leg muscle strength. Is that bad?
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