Go Back  Bike Forums > The Lounge > Foo
Reload this Page >

Saying yes sir and yes maam

Notices
Foo Off-Topic chit chat with no general subject.

Saying yes sir and yes maam

Old 10-23-19, 06:37 AM
  #51  
FiftySix
I'm the anecdote.
 
FiftySix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: S.E. Texas
Posts: 1,244

Bikes: Norco CityGlide, Schwinn "Speedster" Willy

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 659 Post(s)
Liked 532 Times in 382 Posts
Well, if there's anything I've learned from this thread is I gotta watch the "sirs" and "ma'ams" I release verbally if I'm ever out of North America.

Sure, maybe I shouldn't use "sir" and "ma'am" in some parts of North America, but . . . nah. Most people I visit in other states or Canada can tell from my accent that I come from a "foreign" world.
FiftySix is offline  
Old 10-23-19, 06:40 AM
  #52  
ridelikeaturtle
Senior Member
 
ridelikeaturtle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Posts: 840

Bikes: Bianchi Ti Megatube, M Alloy Pro, Sprint 76; Amp Research B4; Colnago Crystal; Klein Pulse; Litespeed Catalyst, Fondriest Squadra Corse

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 397 Post(s)
Liked 125 Times in 81 Posts
Originally Posted by Newspaper_Nick View Post
Ok, despite the fact that English is not my mother tongue, i know that these are words used for greetings and they are not how you address someone. You either address someone with his/her name, or if you don't know their name, you address them with another "noun" of your/their choice, depending on the degree of intimacy that you have. Words like "sweetie, kid, my man, honey, dude, etc" are some examples that i have heard. What we have been taught throughout our education was that "sir and madam" are the right nouns to use for addressing people (especially elders) that we don't know. And now i am reading in this thread that it is wrong. So i am asking, if it is wrong, what is the right way?
A progressive approach is to consider what is the best way to communicate with others, consider what cultural prejudices are reinforced, and use discretion. For example, calling a woman "love" or "hon" is a reinforcement of a patriarchal hierarchy, even misogyny; whether it is intentional or not is irrelevant. Please don't do that.

(Queue the "PC gone mad!" conservative brigade.)
ridelikeaturtle is offline  
Old 10-23-19, 07:00 AM
  #53  
Lemond1985
Sophomore Member
 
Lemond1985's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 1,996
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1175 Post(s)
Liked 493 Times in 323 Posts
For example, calling a woman "love" or "hon" is a reinforcement of a patriarchal hierarchy, even misogyny; whether it is intentional or not is irrelevant.
So are you saying that as a man, if a waitress calls me "sir", she is also reinforcing this same patriarchal hierarchy, even misandry, regardless of intent, and I should get angry with her?

Or should I just sit there and let her insult me, since women are such delicate creatures that need men to protect them, and they should never be called out concerning their blatant sexism, double standards, and hypocrisy? Should men treat them as equals? Or just the benefits of equality with none of the obligations?

The simple act of ordering a cup of coffee these days requires a 4 year degree in gender studies.
Lemond1985 is offline  
Likes For Lemond1985:
Old 10-23-19, 07:08 AM
  #54  
KraneXL
 
KraneXL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: La-la Land, CA
Posts: 3,623

Bikes: Cannondale Quick SL1 Bike - 2014

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3403 Post(s)
Liked 232 Times in 179 Posts
Originally Posted by Newspaper_Nick View Post
Again, with my limited English knowledge, "excuse me" or "pardon" are interjections.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interjection


Now, correct me if i am wrong but, an interjection is not a word that can replace the person's name. Interjections are not nouns. An interjection can be used to call the attention of a person, yes, shouting "excuse me" or "hey" would probably get me a waiter. But, still, these are not answering my question. You still haven't given me a noun that can replace the name of the person that i am interacting with. You don't like sir or madam, i get that, but what other nouns can i use?
You are not incorrect. Sir and ma'am is the correct formal way to address a man or a women you do not know (Ms. can substitute for a young women). Anything else is personal preference and when dealing with a customer, client or patron you would adapt to whatever name or title they request.

For the record, "excuse me" is formal but not a contraction. "Hey" is the opposite -- casual and is a contraction.

Last edited by KraneXL; 10-23-19 at 07:14 AM.
KraneXL is offline  
Old 10-23-19, 07:17 AM
  #55  
Machka 
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,808

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 138 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3092 Post(s)
Liked 277 Times in 176 Posts
Originally Posted by Newspaper_Nick View Post
Again, with my limited English knowledge, "excuse me" or "pardon" are interjections.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interjection

Now, correct me if i am wrong but, an interjection is not a word that can replace the person's name. Interjections are not nouns. An interjection can be used to call the attention of a person, yes, shouting "excuse me" or "hey" would probably get me a waiter. But, still, these are not answering my question. You still haven't given me a noun that can replace the name of the person that i am interacting with. You don't like sir or madam, i get that, but what other nouns can i use?
If you must use a noun ... personally, I don't ... how about the person's name?

And I don't shout to get the attention of a waiter or waitress ... that would be very rude. I either go to the counter or when they come by, I'll quietly say, "excuse me ... ". Or maybe they'll drop by the table to ask if everything is all right, and I'll say, "It's lovely thank you, but we wondered if we could get some water."
Machka is offline  
Likes For Machka:
Old 10-23-19, 07:19 AM
  #56  
eja_ bottecchia
Senior Member
 
eja_ bottecchia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 5,665
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 944 Post(s)
Liked 345 Times in 229 Posts
Originally Posted by ahsposo View Post
"No problem"

Of course...
eja_ bottecchia is offline  
Old 10-23-19, 07:26 AM
  #57  
Machka 
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,808

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 138 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3092 Post(s)
Liked 277 Times in 176 Posts
Originally Posted by KraneXL View Post
Sir and ma'am is the correct formal way to address a man or a women you do not know
In who's culture?


Originally Posted by Lemond1985 View Post
So are you saying that as a man, if a waitress calls me "sir",
As a woman, I have a great deal of difficulty calling a man "sir". In fact, I don't think I've ever done it. There has never been a situation where it was appropriate.
Machka is offline  
Old 10-23-19, 07:27 AM
  #58  
Machka 
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,808

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 138 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3092 Post(s)
Liked 277 Times in 176 Posts
Originally Posted by ahsposo View Post
"No problem"
"No worries!"

And if people feel they must add a noun, the appropriate noun to use with that phrase is "mate". It applies to male or female equally.
Machka is offline  
Old 10-23-19, 07:40 AM
  #59  
DrIsotope
Non omnino gravis
 
DrIsotope's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: SoCal, USA!
Posts: 7,731

Bikes: Nekobasu, Pandicorn

Mentioned: 116 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4303 Post(s)
Liked 814 Times in 492 Posts
The idea that calling a waiter/waitress by their first name is somehow preferable to sir or ma'am is a clear indicator that things work differently in different places. Calling out to the wait staff by their first name (unless you know that person in a capacity above and beyond server/served) is using that person's name as an exhibition of power-- at least in my limited experience here, where I've lived my entire life. You know their name but they don't know yours. Do you introduce yourself like you're at a formal to-do every time you slide into a both at the Denny's? Because I can tell you from direct experience, wait staff don't give a crap. They serve hundreds of people every day. Round here, no waiter or waitress is going to be insulted by sir or ma'am or miss.

As to the folks who seem to get upset by what other people call them,

No one can make you feel inferior without your consent. -- Eleanor Roosevelt
__________________
DrIsotope is offline  
Likes For DrIsotope:
Old 10-23-19, 07:46 AM
  #60  
FiftySix
I'm the anecdote.
 
FiftySix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: S.E. Texas
Posts: 1,244

Bikes: Norco CityGlide, Schwinn "Speedster" Willy

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 659 Post(s)
Liked 532 Times in 382 Posts
Originally Posted by Machka View Post
In who's culture?


FiftySix is offline  
Likes For FiftySix:
Old 10-23-19, 07:49 AM
  #61  
Newspaper_Nick
Senior Member
 
Newspaper_Nick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 152
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 130 Post(s)
Liked 71 Times in 44 Posts
Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
The idea that calling a waiter/waitress by their first name is somehow preferable to sir or ma'am is a clear indicator that things work differently in different places. Calling out to the wait staff by their first name (unless you know that person in a capacity above and beyond server/served) is using that person's name as an exhibition of power-- at least in my limited experience here, where I've lived my entire life. You know their name but they don't know yours. Do you introduce yourself like you're at a formal to-do every time you slide into a both at the Denny's? Because I can tell you from direct experience, wait staff don't give a crap. They serve hundreds of people every day. Round here, no waiter or waitress is going to be insulted by sir or ma'am or miss.

As to the folks who seem to get upset by what other people call them,

No one can make you feel inferior without your consent. -- Eleanor Roosevelt
That is exactly my point. In my culture, addressing any person who is older than you (like 10 years or more) with his/her name is disrespectful. And also, looking at the nametag of an employee and addressing him/her with that name is also considered disrespectful. I am glad that some parts of USA still cares for respect. I wouldn't dream of calling a 60 year old person with his/her name. If i am not mistaken, soldiers use sir and madam all the time. And they are considered some of the most respecful people in your country.

By the way, I have learned my English from Oxford University Press publishings
Newspaper_Nick is offline  
Likes For Newspaper_Nick:
Old 10-23-19, 07:56 AM
  #62  
Machka 
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,808

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 138 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3092 Post(s)
Liked 277 Times in 176 Posts
Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
The idea that calling a waiter/waitress by their first name is somehow preferable to sir or ma'am is a clear indicator that things work differently in different places.
You'd only do it if they had a name tag on or if you knew the person. We are somewhat "regulars" in a very small handful of restaurants/cafes and do see the same people there and sometimes do exchange names.

Most of the time, using a "noun" to refer to another person isn't important. You'll get the occasional "mate" in more casual circumstances, but other than that, I can't think of a reason to use a "noun" or a place where I would.
Machka is offline  
Old 10-23-19, 07:56 AM
  #63  
FiftySix
I'm the anecdote.
 
FiftySix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: S.E. Texas
Posts: 1,244

Bikes: Norco CityGlide, Schwinn "Speedster" Willy

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 659 Post(s)
Liked 532 Times in 382 Posts
I think if you wear a name tag because your job requires it, that means your employer wants customers to be able to call you by name.

One of my first jobs out of high school was as a car mechanic. My uniform shirts had my name embroidered on a little patch above a pocket. Most customers that I never met before would call me by name once the initial greetings had been done.

Plus, around here most wait staff introduce themselves to you as well as have a name tag. Not counting an IHOP or the like, most wait staff around here will say "Hello, I'm [Pat] and I'll be serving you today." That for sure makes their name fair game with me.

BTW, I have to be at a trade show at the end of this week. My employer saw fit to embroider our first names on our sleeves. Great.
FiftySix is offline  
Old 10-23-19, 07:56 AM
  #64  
Hondo Gravel
Viking Berserker
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Hondo,Texas
Posts: 1,317

Bikes: Too many Motobecanes

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 896 Post(s)
Liked 572 Times in 383 Posts
I was in Alabama and the older waitresses called me honey, sugar or baby. Was taken off guard but I realized I was in the Deep South. The part of Texas I’m from is more Southwest culturally. Anyways I didn’t care the eggs and grits were delicious.
Hondo Gravel is online now  
Likes For Hondo Gravel:
Old 10-23-19, 07:59 AM
  #65  
FiftySix
I'm the anecdote.
 
FiftySix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: S.E. Texas
Posts: 1,244

Bikes: Norco CityGlide, Schwinn "Speedster" Willy

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 659 Post(s)
Liked 532 Times in 382 Posts
Originally Posted by Hondo Gravel View Post
I was in Alabama and the older waitresses called me honey, sugar or baby. Was taken off guard but I realized I was in the Deep South. The part of Texas I’m from is more Southwest culturally. Anyways I didn’t care the eggs and grits were delicious.
You start some of the best threads, Hondo. I mean, sir.
FiftySix is offline  
Likes For FiftySix:
Old 10-23-19, 08:05 AM
  #66  
Newspaper_Nick
Senior Member
 
Newspaper_Nick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 152
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 130 Post(s)
Liked 71 Times in 44 Posts
Originally Posted by Hondo Gravel View Post
I was in Alabama and the older waitresses called me honey, sugar or baby. Was taken off guard but I realized I was in the Deep South. The part of Texas Im from is more Southwest culturally. Anyways I didnt care the eggs and grits were delicious.
Are you kiddin me? Being called honey or sugar by a waitress should put a huge smile on your face. Assuming that she is older than you, that is instant intimacy and it is beautiful. And i'd call her "ma'am". My respect would compliment her affection. That is the right way to do it.

And "mate" is the Australian way of saying "dude" or "man" if i am not mistaken. How is this even polite?
Newspaper_Nick is offline  
Old 10-23-19, 08:06 AM
  #67  
Machka 
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,808

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 138 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3092 Post(s)
Liked 277 Times in 176 Posts
Originally Posted by FiftySix View Post
BTW, I have to be at a trade show at the end of this week. My employer saw fit to embroider our first names on our sleeves. Great.
Hey Fifty! How ya goin', mate? Got plans this arvo? Best to get them in, she'll be chucking it down this weekend!

Machka is offline  
Old 10-23-19, 08:10 AM
  #68  
Machka 
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,808

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 138 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3092 Post(s)
Liked 277 Times in 176 Posts
Originally Posted by Newspaper_Nick View Post
And "mate" is the Australian way of saying "dude" or "man" if i am not mistaken. How is this even polite?
It's casual. And it refers to both males and females. I get referred to as "mate" now and then. It's often used with "cheers" like "Cheers mate!" which is quite acceptable.

You might use it if you went to a Zambreros or Banjos or similar and they handed you your order.
Machka is offline  
Old 10-23-19, 08:14 AM
  #69  
Hondo Gravel
Viking Berserker
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Hondo,Texas
Posts: 1,317

Bikes: Too many Motobecanes

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 896 Post(s)
Liked 572 Times in 383 Posts
Sometimes when conversing with people where English is not their native language they may come across as rude. But I realize that is not their intention since they are searching for the words in English. Im a National Park junky so talking to people from all over the place is interesting. Hello is fairly universal so that word sees to go over well.
Hondo Gravel is online now  
Old 10-23-19, 08:18 AM
  #70  
Hondo Gravel
Viking Berserker
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Hondo,Texas
Posts: 1,317

Bikes: Too many Motobecanes

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 896 Post(s)
Liked 572 Times in 383 Posts
Originally Posted by FiftySix View Post
You start some of the best threads, Hondo. I mean, sir.
My family refers to me a Burro. Like get over here burro and move these heavy plants and put them over there. Just wait and let the burro pick those up.
Hondo Gravel is online now  
Old 10-23-19, 08:19 AM
  #71  
Machka 
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,808

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 138 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3092 Post(s)
Liked 277 Times in 176 Posts
Originally Posted by Hondo Gravel View Post
Sometimes when conversing with people where English is not their native language they may come across as rude. But I realize that is not their intention since they are searching for the words in English. Im a National Park junky so talking to people from all over the place is interesting. Hello is fairly universal so that word sees to go over well.
I attend university, and my classes of up to about 500 students usually consist of a very few Aussies, one Canadian-Australian, and about 98.5% Asian from various parts of Asia. You're right, "hello" is a good way to begin.
Machka is offline  
Old 10-23-19, 08:21 AM
  #72  
Hondo Gravel
Viking Berserker
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Hondo,Texas
Posts: 1,317

Bikes: Too many Motobecanes

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 896 Post(s)
Liked 572 Times in 383 Posts
Originally Posted by Newspaper_Nick View Post
Are you kiddin me? Being called honey or sugar by a waitress should put a huge smile on your face. Assuming that she is older than you, that is instant intimacy and it is beautiful. And i'd call her "ma'am". My respect would compliment her affection. That is the right way to do it.

And "mate" is the Australian way of saying "dude" or "man" if i am not mistaken. How is this even polite?
I liked it I even blushed. If they were younger than me all the better
Hondo Gravel is online now  
Likes For Hondo Gravel:
Old 10-23-19, 08:26 AM
  #73  
KraneXL
 
KraneXL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: La-la Land, CA
Posts: 3,623

Bikes: Cannondale Quick SL1 Bike - 2014

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3403 Post(s)
Liked 232 Times in 179 Posts
Originally Posted by FiftySix View Post
I think if you wear a name tag because your job requires it, that means your employer wants customers to be able to call you by name.

One of my first jobs out of high school was as a car mechanic. My uniform shirts had my name embroidered on a little patch above a pocket. Most customers that I never met before would call me by name once the initial greetings had been done.

Plus, around here most wait staff introduce themselves to you as well as have a name tag. Not counting an IHOP or the like, most wait staff around here will say "Hello, I'm [Pat] and I'll be serving you today." That for sure makes their name fair game with me.

BTW, I have to be at a trade show at the end of this week. My employer saw fit to embroider our first names on our sleeves. Great.
Exactly right. But it works a little different in the workplace. The paying customer makes the requests and the employee provides the service. There is a clear hierarchy here, and the paying customer always occupy the top rung (I know, government offices).

Anyway, when you represent a business your employer gets to dictate the terms of social engagement which is something you agree to when you accept the job. The name tag makes sure you represent the company appropriately and are identifiable should there be any issues.

Most companies ask you how you'd like to be refereed as for name tags, but typically that's your first name. Some employers will allow nick names depending on the type of establishment. Unfortunately formal titles are rarely ever used anymore except maybe in government.


Originally Posted by Hondo Gravel View Post
Sometimes when conversing with people where English is not their native language they may come across as rude. But I realize that is not their intention since they are searching for the words in English. Im a National Park junky so talking to people from all over the place is interesting. Hello is fairly universal so that word sees to go over well.
Hello is pretty much global.

Funny story: I was taking to a coworker who's first language wasn't English and he thanked me for some task I had performed. I said "don't mention it" and he began to get upset because he believe I was telling him not to talk to me. I tried to explain the phrase but he still walked away confused and never spoke to me again.
KraneXL is offline  
Old 10-23-19, 09:37 AM
  #74  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 8,868

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Moto Fantom29 ProSL hardtail

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Liked 368 Times in 280 Posts
Originally Posted by Newspaper_Nick View Post
Ok, despite the fact that English is not my mother tongue, i know that these are words used for greetings and they are not how you address someone. You either address someone with his/her name, or if you don't know their name, you address them with another "noun" of your/their choice, depending on the degree of intimacy that you have. Words like "sweetie, kid, my man, honey, dude, etc" are some examples that i have heard. What we have been taught throughout our education was that "sir and madam" are the right nouns to use for addressing people (especially elders) that we don't know. And now i am reading in this thread that it is wrong. So i am asking, if it is wrong, what is the right way?
It's not wrong, and nobody would be confused by it, but it's getting outmoded (except mostly for military seepage).

I also would say 'hi' or 'hello', or 'excuse me' to catch the attention of a passing waitperson.* Also, if they are wearing a nametag (and moving slow enough that you can read it), presumably they are ok with being addressed by that name. Certainly after they introduce themselves ("Hi, I'm xx and I'll be your server today...") you are thereby invited to address them by that name, and I think making an effort to remember that name and use it, shows that you consider them a fellow person, rather than an anonymous food delivery system that might as well be a robot.

*I would NOT snap my fingers and shout 'boy'. I wouldn't say 'sir' or 'mrs' or 'mz', but could conceivably say 'miss' for a girl or woman. Maybe 'ma'am' if she's really old.
RubeRad is offline  
Likes For RubeRad:
Old 10-23-19, 09:42 AM
  #75  
Jim from Boston
Senior Member
 
Jim from Boston's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 7,214
Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 761 Post(s)
Liked 139 Times in 115 Posts
Saying yes sir and yes ma’am

Originally Posted by ridelikeaturtle View Post
I view the use of "yes sir" etc to be demeaning /to the person who uses it/; and if you demand or require it's use, you're trying to assert your perception of authority or class hierarchy onto others.

My worldview incorporates and applies equality to everyone, and so the deferential use of "sir" doesn't apply to anyone. It's not disrespectful. It's more respectful to everyone, including yourself.

Culturally and historically, it is an interesting topic, the use and meaning of language over time.
Originally Posted by Moe Zhoost View Post
Odd opinions, indeed. Nobody is diminished by displaying courteous respect to others. Quite the opposite, I'd say.
As a Fifty-Plus subscriber, I am a yes sir and yes ma’am advocate, in agreement with @Moe Zhoost above. I’m a Radio Talk Show fan, and I was particularly imprinted with that usage by a legendary Boston Host, Jerry Williams who would often reply with an emphatic one word “Yessir.” Sometimes I even reply "yes sir" accidentally to a (presumed self-identified) lady though not in the reverse.

I was trying to think of some more “collegial” rather than deferential perfunctory replies to stranger, e.g. “Yes, my good fellow,” or "Yes, honey.” A colleague quickly corrected me of that notion; to be politically correct in these Modern Times, one should not even reply by Gender, just an impersonal Yes or No.

Furthermore, she then reminded me of the TV series “Married with Children," where Al Bundy and his buddies would hold meetings in Al's garage of their Club, NO MA’AM: National Organization of Men Against Amazonian Masterhood.

Last edited by Jim from Boston; 10-23-19 at 09:55 AM.
Jim from Boston is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.