Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Winter Cycling
Reload this Page >

is there a line for you?

Notices
Winter Cycling Don't let snow and ice discourage you this winter. The key element to year-round cycling is proper attire! Check out this winter cycling forum to chat with other ice bike fanatics.

is there a line for you?

Old 01-05-16, 09:39 AM
  #1  
ericmerg1
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 123
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
is there a line for you?

So yesterday I rode at 16 degrees and was fine for ~25 miles before my toes chilled, today it's -3 and I decided that it's going to be too danged cold (took a few riding friends to talk me out of it). so is there a line where you guys just say it's too danged cold.

edit: I went out riding anyway, only did 9 miles though

Last edited by ericmerg1; 01-05-16 at 11:37 AM.
ericmerg1 is offline  
Old 01-05-16, 09:41 AM
  #2  
corrado33
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Bozeman
Posts: 4,094

Bikes: 199? Landshark Roadshark, 198? Mondonico Diamond, 1987 Panasonic DX-5000, 1987 Bianchi Limited, Univega... Chrome..., 1989 Schwinn Woodlands, Motobecane USA Record, Raleigh Tokul 2

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1126 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
No. I commute on my bike. My bike and I do better in the extreme cold than my cars do.
corrado33 is offline  
Old 01-05-16, 10:25 AM
  #3  
FrozenK
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 1,036
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 174 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Anything colder than -10F and it is hard to have fun. Other than to say "I rode in -15F" weather.
FrozenK is offline  
Old 01-05-16, 11:11 AM
  #4  
Leebo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: North of Boston
Posts: 5,617

Bikes: Kona Dawg, Surly 1x1, Karate Monkey, Rockhopper, Crosscheck , Burley Runabout,

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 823 Post(s)
Liked 58 Times in 41 Posts
Below 20 F becomes less fun for me with way more prep. Not That I haven't pedaled colder. I don't want stupid cold to become dangerous. But then again, I mt bike year round too.
Leebo is offline  
Old 01-05-16, 11:27 AM
  #5  
nripin
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 68
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
i rode in this morning at 5f and had to break icicles from the balaclava (chuckle)!
nripin is offline  
Old 01-05-16, 02:27 PM
  #6  
PaulRivers
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 6,286
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 444 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Colder than...0f I think? There's a point where any exposed skin can get frostbike in a few minutes - keep in mind that you're biking into the wind so assume at least a 15mph wind. Can you get around that? Definitely - but it requires more planning and clothing to make sure everything is always covered. The face area around the mask is the biggest potential problem area. Also annoying is how bike jacket manufacturers like to make bike jackets short in the front.

I get hesitant to bike below about 15f, it just gets so cold it's not as much fun. I've done it, but since I have a car anyways I mostly just take the car.

We've had some amazing weather here in Minnesota so far this winter, but it look like on Sunday we have a 4 days of deep freeze (high of 0f, low of -5f). Just planning on driving for that stretch.
PaulRivers is offline  
Old 01-05-16, 02:29 PM
  #7  
Daniel4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,355

Bikes: Sekini 1979 ten speed racer

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 884 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 114 Times in 82 Posts
These first two days back to work were a little harder, not because of the cold but because I was loading my pack with clothing and towels for the office for a start of another year. Makes it easier for me to rotate my clothes if some of it is there already.

The only line for me is if we get a dump of fresh snow overnight that is too high to pedal through. Last winter it was 5inches. But this fall I got a new fat bike, I am ordering new studded tires and will see how high of fresh snow it can do. Plowing through snow works up a sweat so low temperatures won't be a concern unless there's mechanical failures due to the temperature.
Daniel4 is offline  
Old 01-05-16, 03:12 PM
  #8  
TriDanny47
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 237
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Fresh snow deeper than 5-6 inches, temp below -10F, or glare ice from a major freezing rain event.
TriDanny47 is offline  
Old 01-05-16, 03:16 PM
  #9  
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 16,501

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 135 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4264 Post(s)
Liked 542 Times in 398 Posts
Cold doesn't stop me but my commute to work is only 3 miles each way. Ice may stop me. My city doesn't believe in plowing the streets too often (no doubt we don't pay enough in property taxes or something) and some winters my route to work becomes a sheet of gnarly ice. At that point, I start to drive.
bikemig is offline  
Old 01-05-16, 04:00 PM
  #10  
Miele Man
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 3,124

Bikes: Miele Latina, Miele Suprema, Miele Uno SL, Miele MTB, Bianchi Model Unknown, Fiori Venezia, VeloSport Adamas AX

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 757 Post(s)
Liked 329 Times in 228 Posts
I commuted year round in Toronto Canada and that often meant riding when it was snowing or the roads were icy. Even without studded tires where I am now I can ride my MTB up a hill when most cars get stopped about halfway up and start sliding back down. You should see the looks the drivers give me when I ride past them.

The biggest boogaboo in winter riding is dressing TOO WARMLY before heading out. Old military Arctic Warfare Training adage = "SWEATING KILLS!" Avoid sweating, wear layers and breathable jacket or windshell that can be EASILY unzipped with your gloved or mittened hands. You do not want to bare your hands if you don't have to especially with gloves as it takes a long time for the fingers to warm up again. I wear wool inner and a windproof shell on my hands. i also drss my lower bodfy in layers with a wind pants over everything when it's really cold.

Your area low temperature plus windchill PLUS RIDING SPEED INTO THE WIND can lead to very dangerous windchill temperatures wherein frostbite can occur in mere minutes or LESS. If you do ride in such extremes then every bit of exposed skin should be covered. I use a blaclava and a face mask.

Sunglasses or TINTED goggles with UVA and UVB protection are a good idea on sunny days but also on cloudy or overcast days. This is really important if you ride when there is little contrast. That's when you can get snowblindness which is VERY painful.

Snowblindness is actually a sunburn inside the eye. In low contrast but bright conditions like an overcast day with snow the iris in the pupil EXPANDS to let in more light in an effort to make out details. What's actually needed is less light. If you ever get caught out in such conditions without sunglasses or tinted goggles a piece of cardboard with a slit in it can be used to prevent snowblindness.

If you are out riding and yoy start to get too cold if you can find any kind of newspaper you can put sheets of it under a layer of clothing where the cold part of your body is -,except your hands.

If you ever start shivering pay VERY close attention to it. When you stop shivering make ABSOLUTELY SURE it's because you have warmed up. Getting cold, not warming andf then stopping shivering is a WARNING SIGN THAT YOU'RE SLIPPING INTO SEVERE HYPOTHERMIA and it can kill you very quickly after that.

I keep a saddle bag on my bicycle in winter with an extra layer of clothing in it that is large enough to go whatever I'm wearing. Even the extra socks are WAY oversize so than go on OVER my shoes. Two plastic bags are carried for emergency shoe covers to keep those extra socks dry on the shoes as well as to block the wind. You can carry another 2 bags to go over your hands but remember they can be a bit slippery on the brake levers.

Happy riding, take precautions, no the limits, stay safe but enjoy your winter riding.

BTW, if you ever get caught in deep snow, if you let most of the air out of your MTB tires (pressure around 15psi) you'll get amazing grip in that snow.

The ONLY deep snow I have a hard time with is that sticky 'packing snow' that snowballs and snowmen get made from.

A couple of times I undid the center bolt on my fromt fender and slif the fender down UNDER my front tire and securted it there so it was like a ski. That let me get through some surprisingle deep snow. i've considered building a detachable ski for the front wheel.

Cheers
Miele Man is offline  
Old 01-05-16, 06:07 PM
  #11  
BobbyG
Senior Member
 
BobbyG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Posts: 4,734

Bikes: 2015 Charge Plug, 1997 Nishiki Blazer, 1984 Nishiki International

Mentioned: 49 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 988 Post(s)
Liked 448 Times in 231 Posts
After missing out on too much winter commuting the previous two years due to having only road tires and wetter winters, last winter I pushed my cold threshold back down to -12F from -23 where it had crept up to over the years. This winter I had an extra bike and bought studded snow tires and have been riding consistently (and LOVING the snow and ice) until last week when the temps hit single digits. Also 3 or 4 inches of snow would be my limit, I think. My problem is fingers below 15F. Actually, just my thumbs. I went to mittens and that has been working, but my thumbs still get cold, I think due to the pressure on my hands limiting circulation.
BobbyG is offline  
Old 01-05-16, 09:54 PM
  #12  
dh024
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Posts: 311
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 96 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 4 Posts
Snowy roads will force me to find another way to commute to work, but the cold usually doesn't stop me. It rarely gets colder than -30C here in Calgary, and that's my rough limit. Anything colder than that, and I find I have to bundle up in too many layers to enjoy the ride. There is definitely an art to finding the right clothing to enjoy being outside in the cold, so it may be that I just don't have that experience yet on those really cold days.
dh024 is offline  
Old 01-06-16, 07:39 AM
  #13  
Daniel4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,355

Bikes: Sekini 1979 ten speed racer

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 884 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 114 Times in 82 Posts
Originally Posted by Miele Man View Post
I commuted year round in Toronto Canada and that often meant riding when it was snowing or the roads were icy. Even without studded tires where I am now I can ride my MTB up a hill when most cars get stopped about halfway up and start sliding back down. You should see the looks the drivers give me when I ride past them....

Ha, ha. Good overall post but I can’t help from commenting about this. What those drivers have on their minds may not be what we may think. They’re saying to themselves how crazy that cyclist is to be riding in this weather.
Daniel4 is offline  
Old 01-06-16, 07:52 AM
  #14  
Machka 
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Posts: 51,812

Bikes: Lots

Mentioned: 138 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3092 Post(s)
Liked 277 Times in 176 Posts
When I lived in Canada (Winnipeg), I commuted down to -40C/F and cycled longer distances down to about -32C or so. I don't know if it is still up on my website (I'm slowly restructuring my website) but my coldest century (100 miles in one day) started at -32C and got up to a nice balmy -25C or so.

Now I live in Australia and find myself complaining when the temperature gets close to 0C.
Machka is offline  
Old 01-06-16, 10:52 AM
  #15  
elcruxio
Senior Member
 
elcruxio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Turku, Finland, Europe
Posts: 1,851

Bikes: 2011 Specialized crux comp, 2013 Specialized Rockhopper Pro

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 338 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 14 Times in 13 Posts
Well this is quite death and destructiony

Originally Posted by Miele Man View Post
The biggest boogaboo in winter riding is dressing TOO WARMLY before heading out. Old military Arctic Warfare Training adage = "SWEATING KILLS!" Avoid sweating, wear layers and breathable jacket or windshell that can be EASILY unzipped with your gloved or mittened hands. You do not want to bare your hands if you don't have to especially with gloves as it takes a long time for the fingers to warm up again. I wear wool inner and a windproof shell on my hands. i also drss my lower bodfy in layers with a wind pants over everything when it's really cold.
While it's true that sweating in the winter is not optimal, the more common outcome with too many clothes in the winter is going to mean that you're going to be rather wet at your destination. "Sweating kills" is only really relevant when you absolutely have no chance of getting to shelter and/or warmth for anytime soon. So we're talking about a long range scout or whatever. Staying within civilization or even within miles of civilization is fine for testing out gear.

Layering up and using a shell is the optimal choice, but what we do for basic everyday riding is we use ordinary clothes underneath (jeans, button down shirt, merino sweater etc) and downhill skiing clothes on the top (jacket, pants). Then you'll always be presentable since you can just take off the padded warm top layer. Then you'll just have to fit your speed to your sweating.

About that bare hand thing. When mountain biking I'm frequently forced to take off all gloves especially when climbing long uphills since gloves just get too hot. I usually have double layer gloves with a thin base layer and a shell glove but sometimes I need to take off even the base layer. When you're that hot it really doesn't take long for the hands to warm up again. The coldest I've taken my gloves off was -20F I think.

Your area low temperature plus windchill PLUS RIDING SPEED INTO THE WIND can lead to very dangerous windchill temperatures wherein frostbite can occur in mere minutes or LESS. If you do ride in such extremes then every bit of exposed skin should be covered. I use a blaclava and a face mask.
Weeelll.... Yeah. depending at what temps. I'd say covering your whole face and even nose comes relevant for me at maybe -40 or colder. Today was -15F and I had my mouth and nose out the whole 2.5 hour ride. And it was a road ride so the windchill was there.

Depending on what area of the skin we're talking about and how accustomed you are one can manage with exposed skin. Ears are usually very sensitive, but cheeks and nose are quite individual. But it's pretty easy to know when skin is getting too cold as it hurts before it does.

Sunglasses or TINTED goggles with UVA and UVB protection are a good idea on sunny days but also on cloudy or overcast days. This is really important if you ride when there is little contrast. That's when you can get snowblindness which is VERY painful.

Snowblindness is actually a sunburn inside the eye. In low contrast but bright conditions like an overcast day with snow the iris in the pupil EXPANDS to let in more light in an effort to make out details. What's actually needed is less light. If you ever get caught out in such conditions without sunglasses or tinted goggles a piece of cardboard with a slit in it can be used to prevent snowblindness.
These are good ideas. I mentioned in the other topic that I don't use goggles, but I converted and bought 100% enduro goggles which are clear but still have 100% UV protection.

If you are out riding and yoy start to get too cold if you can find any kind of newspaper you can put sheets of it under a layer of clothing where the cold part of your body is -,except your hands.
or just go and get a coffee or something. And then ride home and think about new clothing options.

If you ever start shivering pay VERY close attention to it. When you stop shivering make ABSOLUTELY SURE it's because you have warmed up. Getting cold, not warming andf then stopping shivering is a WARNING SIGN THAT YOU'RE SLIPPING INTO SEVERE HYPOTHERMIA and it can kill you very quickly after that.
I mean, yeah... This is technically true but very unlikely to happen on a normal bike ride if you're not severely under prepared, as in wet t-shirt in the freezing temps or whatever. I've never heard of anyone getting that cold when exercising and the situation hasn't been a medical emergency of some other kind beforehand.

I keep a saddle bag on my bicycle in winter with an extra layer of clothing in it that is large enough to go whatever I'm wearing. Even the extra socks are WAY oversize so than go on OVER my shoes. Two plastic bags are carried for emergency shoe covers to keep those extra socks dry on the shoes as well as to block the wind. You can carry another 2 bags to go over your hands but remember they can be a bit slippery on the brake levers.
I usually just carry a pair of extra thick old german mittens (too warm for even -40, they're ridiculously warm) to warm up my hands if things get bad. Fingers can go bad quick, as can toes so those are the things I prepare for. I really need to get some heat packs I can fit into my shoes.


BTW, if you ever get caught in deep snow, if you let most of the air out of your MTB tires (pressure around 15psi) you'll get amazing grip in that snow.

The ONLY deep snow I have a hard time with is that sticky 'packing snow' that snowballs and snowmen get made from.
If only this worked, but sadly even 2.5" wide mtb tires cannot float on powder if it's deep enough. Actually, no, they can't float, but they can spin in the snow if the snow is not deep enough. A fatbike would be nice so I could ride snowmobile routes but even deep power is apparently too loose for a fatbike.

You'll be better walking your bike rather than trying to ride it in too deep snow.

Cold is just cold. It's not rocket science. I've lived my whole life at or near the arctic circle so for me cold is just a very casual thing. The only times I actually really think about what to wear is when going for a longer road ride in the really cold weather, or when going for a multi hour XC ski trip, or when going for a multi hour MTB ride in the extremes.

So far I haven't faced a weather too cold for riding.
elcruxio is offline  
Old 01-06-16, 07:16 PM
  #16  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: High Falls, NY, USA
Posts: 38,561

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 464 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6190 Post(s)
Liked 691 Times in 461 Posts
Everyone's limit is different, and conditioning and skill are big factors.

Last winter, my limit was about 15ºF. My commute is 14 miles long, and it takes over an hour. Exposure that long gets painful. This winter, I bought better clothes, so I hope to increase my tolerance for hour-long exposure. NYC is a very windy city, and my route is right next to the Hudson River, so whatever the weather department reports as the temperature and wind speed is not true for me.

My only incentives for pushing my limit are to have fun and to feel badass. I really don't need to do it. My other way of commuting is to walk 15 minutes to the subway, ride the subway, and then walk 5 minutes to work. And the subway works almost perfectly in bad weather, so it's really a very sensible way of travel in bad weather. But reading all these super badass Canadians and Minnesotans here about how they ride in -40º weather makes me want to push my own limit.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Old 01-06-16, 07:34 PM
  #17  
Riveting
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 556

Bikes: '13 Trek Madone 2.3, '13 Diamondback Hybrid Commuter, '17 Spec Roubaix Di2, '17 Spec Camber 29'er

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 208 Post(s)
Liked 54 Times in 38 Posts
Originally Posted by Miele Man View Post
I've considered building a detachable ski for the front wheel.
Did you ever make the ski? I imagined you holding the front brake closed with a rubber band, and attaching the ski with tie wraps (or velcro straps) around the tire/rim? Was balancing easy?
Riveting is offline  
Old 01-06-16, 07:41 PM
  #18  
Riveting
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 556

Bikes: '13 Trek Madone 2.3, '13 Diamondback Hybrid Commuter, '17 Spec Roubaix Di2, '17 Spec Camber 29'er

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 208 Post(s)
Liked 54 Times in 38 Posts
Originally Posted by Machka View Post
...my coldest century (100 miles in one day) started at -32C (-26F) and got up to a nice balmy -25C (-13F)
This made me smile since I did a century that was 50 degrees (F) warmer than your temps, and I felt like a (very cold) badass!
Riveting is offline  
Old 01-06-16, 08:53 PM
  #19  
Alligator
Senior Member
 
Alligator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 140
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I'll ride in any temperature, but when it's below -10 F I'll limit the distance. It starts to get a little hard at that temperature.
Alligator is offline  
Old 01-06-16, 09:43 PM
  #20  
Arcanum
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 903

Bikes: 2010 Kona Dr. Dew, Moose Bicycle XXL (fat bike), Yuba Mundo V3

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Not in terms of temperature. I can bundle up to be reasonably comfortable at -15F, and generally need to at least a few times every year. What happens more is that the distance I'm willing to go for nonessential activities (I don't have a car) tends to shrink with snow and darkness.
Arcanum is offline  
Old 01-06-16, 11:55 PM
  #21  
V73
Menior Sember
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Farmington Hills, MI
Posts: 104

Bikes: 1995 Trek Mountain Track 800 Sport, 2005 Diamondback Sorrento

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I haven't hit a temp limit yet, but last year I had to take a number of days off due to deep snow or mechanical failure. That was also my very first year winter cycling, so I hope to do better this winter. Of course, it hasn't gotten below 20ºF yet and there's no snow on the ground, so I'm assuming I'll eventually get a winter...
V73 is offline  
Old 01-06-16, 11:59 PM
  #22  
jfowler85
Senior Member
 
jfowler85's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Zinj
Posts: 1,828

Bikes: '93 911 Turbo 3.6

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 109 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The only time I do not ride, this year at least, is when there is standing water on the roads. Primarily because I haven't installed fenders yet on the newest bike and cleaning the consequent grit out of every part gets old. Otherwise, I rode all of last winter which routinely saw temperatures below 0f. This year is much more mild, hence the comment about water on the roads. In fact, it is supposed to pour all day tomorrow...again...so it looks like I'll be in the car.
jfowler85 is offline  
Old 01-07-16, 02:09 AM
  #23  
Plimogz
Global Warming Witness
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Mtl.Qc.Can
Posts: 321
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Yeah, the unplowed line by the side of road, under the ice and snow, forcing me to ride too far into the lane, constantly worrying about jerks who will pass with an impatient acceleration and less than 2 foots' clearance... That keeps me local, more than anything else.

Otherwise I have clothes and boots and gloves good enough for down to about -25° C. And while I do not feel like I could currently manage prolonged -30° C (before wind chill), that would be remedied, easily enough, by nicer pair of boots. It is all down to the clothes, I think.

The funny bit, however, is that because I own decent enough face and hand wind protection, and plenty of woolen hats, shirts, tights and socks, with good studded tires to boot, but do not own any proper rain gear, I would much rather do sunny and snowy -20°C than near-freezing rainy.
Plimogz is offline  
Old 01-07-16, 05:06 AM
  #24  
Jim from Boston
Senior Member
 
Jim from Boston's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 7,214
Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 761 Post(s)
Liked 139 Times in 115 Posts
Originally Posted by Daniel4 View Post
Ha, ha. Good overall post but I can’t help from commenting about this. What those drivers have on their minds may not be what we may think. They’re saying to themselves how crazy that cyclist is to be riding in this weather.
The most strident objections about winter cycling I receive from people who know me are the concerns for the driver themselves, not only because we delay them, but particularly for fear they might hit me.

Most comments though are, "You didn't ride your bike today, did you?" Anticipation of that question is for me a motivation to ride. On a couple of occasions, including yesterday at 8° F, my wife (a former cyclist herself) has chided me, "You just want to ride today so you can write about it on Bike Forums."
Jim from Boston is online now  
Old 01-07-16, 05:14 AM
  #25  
Jim from Boston
Senior Member
 
Jim from Boston's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 7,214
Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 761 Post(s)
Liked 139 Times in 115 Posts
Originally Posted by Leebo View Post
Below 20 F becomes less fun for me with way more prep. Not That I haven't pedaled colder. I don't want stupid cold to become dangerous. But then again, I mt bike year round too.
A favorite post of mine about winter cycling was this reply to "When does Hardcore become Stupid?"

Originally Posted by StephenH View Post
Hardcore becomes stupid when it becomes dangerous.

Hardcore becomes stupid when anything going wrong becomes a safety problem instead of an inconvenience…

Hardcore becomes stupid when minor errors in judgment become safety issues...

Hardcore has clearly become completely stupid when you lose any fingers or toes to frostbite...

In each case, it's not just the weather that makes it hardcore or stupid, it's the degree of preparation and knowledge used in dealing with the weather.
So when I get ribbed about winter riding, my best reply is that "I'm hardcore, but not stupid."
Jim from Boston is online now  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.