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Music The Standards AKA Great American Songbook

Old 11-16-19, 07:57 AM
  #76  
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The Song: The Way You Look Tonight

"The Way You Look Tonight" is a song from the film Swing Time that was performed by Fred Astaire and written by Dorothy Fields and Jerome Kern. It won the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1936.

Fields remarked, "The first time Jerry played that melody for me I went out and started to cry. The release absolutely killed me. I couldn't stop, it was so beautiful."

In the movie, Astaire sang "The Way You Look Tonight" to Ginger Rogers while she was washing her hair in an adjacent room. His recording reached the top of the charts in 1936.

Fred Astaire version


Chris Botti version


Michael Buble version

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Old 11-18-19, 05:29 AM
  #77  
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The Song: Bewitched, Bothered, Bewildered

"Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered"is a show tune and popular song from the 1940Rodgers and HartmusicalPal Joey. It is part of the Great American Songbook. The song was introduced by Vivienne Segal on December 25, 1940, in the Broadway production during Act I, Scene 6, and again in Act II, Scene 4, as a reprise. Segal also sang the song on both the 1950 hit record and in the 1952 Broadway revival. It was performed by Carol Bruce in the 1954 London production.

The Rod Stewart & Cher version


The Linda Ronstadt version


The Ella Fitzgerald version

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Old 11-20-19, 06:03 AM
  #78  
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The Song: Unforgettable
"Unforgettable" is a popular song written by Irving Gordon and produced by Lee Gillette. The song's original working title was "Uncomparable"; however, the music publishing company asked Gordon to change it to "Unforgettable". The song was published in 1951.

The most popular version of the song was recorded by Nat King Cole in 1951 from his album Unforgettable (1952), with an arrangement written by Nelson Riddle. A non-orchestrated version of the song recorded in 1952 is featured as one of the seven bonus tracks on Cole's 1998 CD reissue of 1955's otherwise completely instrumental album, Penthouse Serenade. Cole recorded the tune anew in a stereo version of the Riddle arrangement, for the album The Nat King Cole Story (1961).

Nat King Cole version


But here's the Dinah Washington version with her distinct vocal style


Then there's the famous duet with Natalie Cole

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Old 11-21-19, 07:12 AM
  #79  
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The Song: Lullaby of Birdland
George Shearing wrote "Lullaby of Birdland" in 1952 for Morris Levy, the owner of the New York jazz club Birdland. Levy had got in touch with Shearing and explained that he'd started a regular Birdland-sponsored disk jockey show, and he wanted Shearing to record a theme which was "to be played every hour on the hour." Levy originally wanted his own music to be recorded, but Shearing insisted he couldn't relate very well with it and wanted to compose his own music. They compromised by sharing the rights of the song; the composer's rights went to Shearing, and the publishing rights went to Levy.

Shearing stated in his autobiography that he had composed "the whole thing [...] within ten minutes."

Jean Constantin composed the lyrics to a French version, "Lola ou La légende du pays aux oiseaux".

Sarah Vaughan with Clifford Brown version


The Earl Palmer Trio (from the movie soundtrack Fabulous Baker Boys)


French vocal version Jean Constantin

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Old 11-21-19, 07:29 AM
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The Song: Take Five
"Take Five" is a jazz standard composed by Paul Desmond and originally recorded by the Dave Brubeck Quartet at Columbia Records' 30th Street Studio in New York City on July 1, 1959 for their album Time Out. Two years later it became a hit
[a] and the biggest-selling jazz single ever. Revived since in numerous movie and television soundtracks, the piece still receives significant radio airplay.

Dave Brubeck Quartet version


Al Jarreau version: It begins with a warm up because of his "vocalese" style. Then begins the singing.

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Old 11-22-19, 08:03 AM
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The Song: Things Ain't What They Used To Be
"Things Ain't What They Used to Be" is a 1942 jazz standard with music by Mercer Ellington and lyrics by Ted Persons.

In 1941 there was a strike against the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, of which Duke Ellington was a member. Because of the strike he could not air his songs on the radio. Instead, he used songs written by his son Mercer and pianist Billy Strayhorn. Strayhorn's compositions of this time include "Take the 'A' Train", "Chelsea Bridge" and "Day Dream". Mercer wrote "Things Ain't What They Used to Be", "Blue Serge" and "Moon Mist".

Jazz musician and historian Chris Tyle argues that most likely Mercer Ellington came up with the melody and his father then arranged the song for the band. The song is most often played as an instrumental. Lyrics were written by Ted Persons. Johnny Hodges played it first, in Hollywood on July 3, 1941. Duke Ellington played it for the film Cabin in the Sky (1943).

An instrumental version was frequently played as the closing music for The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson by The Tonight Show Band under the direction of Doc Severinsen.

Duke Ellington version


Ella Fitzgerald version


Dave Grusin version

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Old 11-22-19, 10:32 AM
  #82  
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Garfield, you're keeping this thread alive! Looks like the list you had ready to go is way longer than the list I have for my self-referential songs thread
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Old 11-22-19, 12:48 PM
  #83  
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Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
Garfield, you're keeping this thread alive! Looks like the list you had ready to go is way longer than the list I have for my self-referential songs thread
Most of the songs, if not all, are "Standards" and it's a piece of Americana. I go to restaurants and some of the music is just an after thought. Sort of what was once described as elevator music.

These, on the other hand, have a sense of that musicality that artists, lyricists, composers, arrangers, hold out as an extension and restatement of that central tradition. Will Swift's compositions ever reach that level?
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Old 11-22-19, 12:53 PM
  #84  
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Agreed. pop/rock/r&b etc doesn't have 'composers' in the same sense. As I understand it, the role of 'producer' is much like 'arranger', taking the basic melody and filling it out with 'orchestration', etc, so that usually a solo artist is just one piece of the cumulative sound that the producer creates.
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Old 11-24-19, 05:42 AM
  #85  
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The song: It's Been A Long Time
The music was written by Jule Styne and the lyrics were written by Sammy Cahn. 1945
The Harry James/Kitty Kallen recording of the song was used in two films in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, notably as a tragically ironic piece of music representing Steve Rogers/Captain America (Chris Evans) and love interest Peggy Carter (Hayley Atwell) being torn apart by time. It is first used in Captain America: The Winter Soldier, when Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) is hiding in Steve's apartment after an assassination attempt by HYDRA agents in the streets of Washington DC, before he is shot by the Winter Soldier. It is later used at the end of Avengers: Endgame when Steve travels back in time and chooses to live out his life with Peggy. The two share a slow dance set to the song, a reference to the dance date Rogers promised Carter right before he was lost in ice for 70 years in Captain America: The First Avenger.

Harry James version


Frank Sinatra version


Les Paul & Chet Atkins version


Keely Smith version

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Old 11-24-19, 07:25 AM
  #86  
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I'm only familiar with Blues standards and for sure they're American. Here's a song written by Texan Hank Thompson that Should be an American standard. Performed by A.J. Croce (Jim's son). https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=seH-JzZVud4
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Old 11-24-19, 07:48 AM
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Nothing more American song wise than Blues. Here's a great example of a Blues standard. You can't call yourself a blues player and not know this, Texan Freddie King.

SRVs version https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=VlME7kkNflA
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Old 11-25-19, 09:20 AM
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The song: Tell Mama (perhaps the Southern Soul) but covered by a few artists
"Tell Mama" is a song written by Clarence Carter, Marcus Daniel and Wilbur Terrell (though some recordings give the sole songwriting credit to Carter). It is best known in its 1967 recording by Etta James. An earlier version of the song was first recorded in 1966 by Carter, as "Tell Daddy".


Etta James version


Clarence Carter Version


Janis Joplin version


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Old 11-26-19, 09:05 AM
  #89  
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The song: I Remember You
"I Remember You" is a popularsong about nostalgiawith music by Victor Schertzinger and words by Johnny Mercer, and first released by Jimmy Dorsey in December 1941.

In 1941, shortly after the death of his father, Mercer began an affair with 19-year-old
Judy Garland while she was engaged to composer David Rose. Garland married Rose to stop the affair, but the effect on Mercer lingered, adding to the emotional depth of his lyrics. Their affair revived later. Mercer stated that his song "I Remember You" was the most direct expression of his feelings for Garland.

Frank Ifield version



Ella Fitzgerald version


Jazzmeir Horn version


Diana Krall version

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Old 11-26-19, 11:07 AM
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I think I posted Sarah Vaughn doing I Remember You away up there, probably one of her famous young versions I was familiar with. Here's a terrible recording of a live concert in Brasil. She slows it down even more and with ever so much of her legendary control, coaxes every last drop of juice out of every note. Amazing!


Of those versions you post, Ella is great of course, never heard of Jazzmeia, her pepped up scatty version is really cool!

But country yodeling? Just no. That belongs in the novelty bin. Ruins a great song

Last edited by RubeRad; 11-26-19 at 11:13 AM.
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Old 11-28-19, 08:50 AM
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The song: Midnight Sun
"Midnight Sun" (1954) was originally an instrumental composed by Lionel Hampton and Sonny Burke in 1947 and is now considered a jazz standard. Subsequently, Johnny Mercer wrote the words to the song. One famous recording of the song with the Mercer lyrics is by Ella Fitzgerald on her 1957 album Like Someone in Love. Fitzgerald recorded the song again for her 1964 album Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Johnny Mercer Songbook. She recorded it for a third time in 1975 with jazz pianist Oscar Peterson on the Pablo release Ella and Oscar.

According to Philip Furia,
Johnny Mercer was driving along the freeway from Palm Springs to Hollywood, California, when he heard the instrumental on his car radio and started to set words to the song as he drove.

Lionel Hampton orchestra version



Ella Fitzgerald version


Tony Bennett version


Nancy Wilson version


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Old 12-03-19, 06:50 AM
  #92  
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The song: Lil' Darlin and the adaptation "Don't Dream of Anybody But Me" Neal Hefti and lyrics Bart Howard
An adaptation is a musical work which uses most of the music or lyrics of another musical work.

"Li'l Darlin'" (copyrighted ©1958 as "Lil' Darlin'") is a jazz standard, composed and arranged in 1957 by Neal Hefti for the Count Basie Orchestra[2] and first recorded on the 1957 album, The Atomic Mr. Basie (Roulette Records). Quoting the New York Times in a 1984 obituary for Basie by jazz critic John Wilson (1913–2002), "Among his band's best-known numbers were "One O'Clock Jump," "Jumpin' at the Woodside," "Li'l Darlin'" and "April in Paris."

Count Basie version


Bobby Darin version


Jackie DeShannon version


Mel Torme & Meltones version


Oscar Peterson trio version


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Old 12-03-19, 07:09 AM
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The song: You Don't Know me
"You Don't Know Me" is a song written by Cindy Walker based on a title and storyline given to her by Eddy Arnold in 1955. "You Don't Know Me" was first recorded by Arnold that year and released as a single on April 21, 1956 on RCA Victor. The first version of the song to make the Billboard charts was by Jerry Vale in 1956, peaking at #14 on the pop chart. Arnold's version charted two months later, released as an RCA Victor single, 47-6502, backed with "The Rockin' Mockin' Bird", which reached #10 on the Billboard country chart. Cash Box magazine, which combined all best-selling versions at one position, included a version by Carmen McRae that never appeared in the Billboard Top 100 Sides listing.

Emmylou Harris version



Ray Charles with Diana Krall version


Israel Kamakawiwo'ole version

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