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Modern Hub on old bike

Old 02-26-21, 01:06 PM
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eyemkeith
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Modern Hub on old bike

Hi all. I'm hoping you smart people can help me.

I'm looking at a new set of wheels for my 90s Bridgestone XO-2 - its first ever new set of shoes -- and I've found a set that I like but I'm not sure I can pull it off on my bike.
The rear is 130mm spacing, which is fine for me, but it's got a 10-speed cassette hub on it. My bike is old and runs 7-speed. My questions is: Should it matter how many speeds there are if it still has the same 130mm spacing? It'll fit regardless, right?

Thanks in advance.

Keith.
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Old 02-26-21, 01:20 PM
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Yes, it will fit if your dropout spacing is 130mm. In order to use a 7 speed cassette you will need a 4.5mm spacer installed behind the cassette
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Old 02-26-21, 01:27 PM
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Yeah, a wheel with a 130mm, 10-speed compatible cassette hub will work. Confirmed that you will need the spacer to fit a narrower 7-speed cassette.

These wheels are now selling for a song as bikes have moved on to 11-speeds (and beyond); 10-speed wheelsets will not fit most wider 11-speed cogsets.

If you have access to older parts, or a bike Co-op, then an even better solution would be a wheel with a 7-speed cassette hub with 130mm stay spacing. All things being equal, this will be superior due to less dish, and more even spoke tensions, right and left.
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Old 02-26-21, 02:21 PM
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Thanks, guys. I should have been clearer, tho. If it fits, I'd just as soon go with a 10-speed and give the old girl a little upgrade.
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Old 02-26-21, 03:19 PM
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IF you have a triple in front, you might also consider 9 speed.
Look at the cog combinations that are available in both and determine which cogs you really want.
IF you have no need for an 11T cog for example, no sense getting a cassette with one. Ditto for overly large cogs.
I run a 13-25 & 12-27 on my 9 speeds and they give me pretty much what I need for each bike without cogs I don't need.
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Old 02-26-21, 03:28 PM
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I’m assuming you are running moustache bars with thumb shifters. You can friction shift or get Microshift thumb shifters.

10 speed chain on 7 speed crank might cause the chain to float between rings.

9 speed might be a better option.

John
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Old 02-26-21, 05:04 PM
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Originally Posted by 70sSanO View Post
Iím assuming you are running moustache bars with thumb shifters. You can friction shift or get Microshift thumb shifters.

10 speed chain on 7 speed crank might cause the chain to float between rings.

9 speed might be a better option.

John
Considering the fewer # cogs, the DER cages are a little wider.
This might result in sloppier indexed shifting as the chain gets narrower.
If friction shifting, no problem.
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Old 02-26-21, 07:51 PM
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I think I am leaning toward the 9-speed cassettes, actually. Seems like that fits me best. Plus, they're about $20 cheaper.

And to answer questions: I run a triple up front and use bar ends, exclusively in friction mode. I really don't care for index much.

Should I go with the 9-speed cassette, this requires of course a spacer of some width on the hub, and a 9-speed chain. Does this then require me to swap out my 30-year old crank as well? Doesn't seem like it should.
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Old 02-26-21, 07:58 PM
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8 or 9 speed cassettes don't need a spacer on an 8-9-10 speed hub.
The "stack" is about the same width with the greater "speed" cassettes having thinner cogs & spacers.
Scroll down just a little bit-
https://www.sheldonbrown.com/cribsheet-spacing.html
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Old 02-26-21, 08:23 PM
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Oh, awesome. That's great!
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Old 02-26-21, 08:30 PM
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Originally Posted by eyemkeith View Post
Should I go with the 9-speed cassette, this requires of course a spacer of some width on the hub, and a 9-speed chain. Does this then require me to swap out my 30-year old crank as well? Doesn't seem like it should.
Once upon a time there was concern about a 9 speed chain floating in between chainrings on a 7 speed crank but I believe it was more of a Shimano concern. I don’t think there will be an issue.

If you are so inclined there was a work around from yesteryear to run 9 speed middle ring, good luck finding one today, based on the positioning of the chainring teeth. The inner ring can easily be accommodated by sanding down the inner ring spacers.

John
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