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Chain length help

Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

Chain length help

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Old 02-11-19, 06:44 PM
  #26  
CliffordK
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Originally Posted by PeopleAreIdiots View Post
I don't make that mistake anymore but I do notice when I take links apart and put them back together, they are always too tight. I have to pry the plates a tiny bit further apart after I drive the pin through them in order to get a nice 'wiggly' connection (am I perhaps doing it wrong? Idk)
I always used to wiggle the chain a bit to get it tight, but not too tight.

However, it was pointed out that your chain tool should have a bottom where you push the pin through, and a thinner shelf higher up.

By putting the chain on the shelf, you can spread the plates slightly.
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Old 02-11-19, 07:39 PM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
I always used to wiggle the chain a bit to get it tight, but not too tight.

However, it was pointed out that your chain tool should have a bottom where you push the pin through, and a thinner shelf higher up.

By putting the chain on the shelf, you can spread the plates slightly.



Can't quite see what you're referring to...

Although this chain tool is a roadie one handed down from my dad so idk if ones meant for track chains are any different. This one seems to work fine for all my 1/8in chains though (albeit creating a super tight connection)
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Old 02-11-19, 08:10 PM
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Hmmm... Here is the Park Mini Chain Tool. I picked one up at a neighbor's garage sale a couple of years ago, but they still make them.



And the basic chain tool.



Hmmm... it looks like that extra shelf is slowly being eliminated.
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Old 02-11-19, 08:26 PM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
Hmmm... Here is the Park Mini Chain Tool. I picked one up at a neighbor's garage sale a couple of years ago, but they still make them.



And the basic chain tool.



Hmmm... it looks like that extra shelf is slowly being eliminated.
huh... yeah I see what you mean.
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Old 02-12-19, 05:28 PM
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Nothing bad ever happened when I rode with my wheel that far back in the dropouts. As long as the whole axle nut is in contact which it looks like it is, you should be cool. I was going between a 16t and a 18t and wasn't willing to take my chain apart every time I switched.
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Old 02-12-19, 06:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Philasteve View Post
Nothing bad ever happened when I rode with my wheel that far back in the dropouts. As long as the whole axle nut is in contact which it looks like it is, you should be cool. I was going between a 16t and a 18t and wasn't willing to take my chain apart every time I switched.
ok maybe I should stop being a baby then Haha
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Old 02-14-19, 01:16 PM
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Originally Posted by PeopleAreIdiots View Post
ok maybe I should stop being a baby then Haha
Yeah if your wheel has never shifted forwards or backwards when it was 10mm further into the dropouts. Why would it start shifting when it's just a little further back, it shouldn't be any different. I think someone suggested a half link in this thread which you could do, but if it were me I wouldn't even bother. I thought it may be dangerous when I had it that far back, then 3 months went by and the winter was over. And I didn't think about it until I was taking my winter tire and cog off.
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Old 02-14-19, 03:30 PM
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A wheel won't shift backwards if tightened down. Certainly not on the drive side where the issue is pulling it forward (and the chain keeps it from falling out anyway). And, if it shifts 1/2" or so on the NDS, you should detect wheel rub on the stays.

I can't say about stress on the dropouts.

Chain wear is an issue, but for 1/2" of chain wear, you'll move the wheel back less than 1/4", and you'll be pushing the max wear pretty high.
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Old 02-14-19, 03:58 PM
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It matters absolutely zero where you are in a dropout or track end except: too far forward - the tire may touch your seattube and the bike may feel a little skittish (shortest possible wheelbase) and far back, you have less weight on the rear tire so it may skid on poor surfaces when you climb out of the saddle and the rear of the bike sits lower with dropouts (but not track ends) so pedal strike may become a factor. Also the brake pads may no longer be hitting the rim squarely (pads too low with wheel forward, too high with wheel back). As long as there is enough material on the dropout/track end to secure the wheel, the bike does not care at all where the wheel is. I suppose all the way forward could be tough on dropouts but I have done it with Campy dropouts, stock Trek 400 series (~'83) frame, Hueret dropouts (?) on a ~'89 Reynolds 501 Peugeot frame and probably others. Never thought about is and have never heard of anyone else ever breaking a dropout doing that,

Several of the factors I mentioned above I studied closely designing my custom fix gear as I wanted a very long dropout with a rear brake so I could 1) use any cog from 12 to 24 for serious mountain climbs, 2) have a good descending bike (both handling and pedal strike) and be able to use a decent size tire with fenders as I use all the cogs in winter and 3) have easy wheel removal for wheel flips and cog changes. I ended up with a dropout that allows 1 3/4" of axle travel set 11 degrees from horizontal (roughly halfway between horizontal and perpendicular to the seatstay). With a Velocity Aero rim, the pads are fully usable until I get far down into the big cogs where the pads are well below the intended braking surface but they work just fine. (And who rides long miles fast on a 42-24? Not me!)

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Old 02-16-19, 06:21 PM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
I can't say about stress on the dropouts.
Thats kindof more what I was concerned about rather than the axle somehow slipping out the back of the dropouts. Honestly though at this point Im thinking Im just being overly cautious.
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