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Comfort: hybrids Vs Endurance road

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Comfort: hybrids Vs Endurance road

Old 08-04-18, 03:11 PM
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dvai
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Comfort: hybrids Vs Endurance road

I know bikes among classes varies, but as a general rule, are hybrids more comfortable than an endurance road?

Transitioning from a hybrid to an endurance road takes some time?
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Old 08-04-18, 03:29 PM
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Define All your terms with perfect precision and i might consider considering a response to this thread.
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Old 08-04-18, 04:00 PM
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Depends on what you're doing and how they're fit and what your body is like and what "hybrid" means and what "endurance road" means.
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Old 08-04-18, 04:04 PM
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Personally, I find hybrids to be less comfortable than road bikes because the upright position forces most of your weight on the saddle. But YMMV.
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Old 08-04-18, 05:25 PM
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Originally Posted by dvai View Post
I know bikes among classes varies, but as a general rule, are hybrids more comfortable than an endurance road?

Transitioning from a hybrid to an endurance road takes some time?
As a rule hybrids are not more comfortable to ride, but they often seem more comfortable to sit on.
Yes, it takes some time to get on a road bike and go for a ride in order to make the transition. It's not instantaneous, but if you're genuinely interested, that wouldn't matter, would it?
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Old 08-04-18, 06:06 PM
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hybrids are generally flat handlebars. Most of us here prefer a drop handlebar to be able to move around the bar to mitigate fatigue and change body position and cheat the wind for more speed.

All in the set up OP. One can set up an endurance drop bar bike with an upright position like that of a hybrid if that is your preference.

Biggest mistake many make without the fitness to support it is to set up a drop bar too low. An endurance bike can be set up to be more comfortable than a hybrid because of the option of getting the drop bar up high enough.
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Old 08-04-18, 06:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Campag4life View Post
hybrids are generally flat handlebars. Most of us here prefer a drop handlebar to be able to move around the bar to mitigate fatigue and change body position and cheat the wind for more speed.

All in the set up OP. One can set up an endurance drop bar bike with an upright position like that of a hybrid if that is your preference.

Biggest mistake many make without the fitness to support it is to set up a drop bar too low. An endurance bike can be set up to be more comfortable than a hybrid because of the option of getting the drop bar up high enough.
This! Go for a drop bar and get a high rise stem to start with........you'll be able to lower it over time, and get way more comfortable then a straight bar bike.
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Old 08-05-18, 12:43 PM
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Thanks all for the response.
So in summary is really playing with the fit on the road bike.
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Old 08-08-18, 02:45 PM
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Hybrids are more comfortable for people with terrible flexibility, and the fatter tire handles a riding style that just plows into stuff on the road while sitted weighted on the seat.

Endurance road bikes can be more comfortable for people with decent flexibility because it better distributes your weight between the front and rear tire so their is just less weight on your rear end, the hoods on curly bars actually are a better hand position for not pinching anything over longer rides, and they can handle anything you run into on a normal road as long as you can slightly unweight yourself and watch where you're steering the bike.

Of course the big thing is that endurance road bikes are faster and less fatiguing to ride over the same distance, because of smaller tires, a more aerodynamic position, and less weight (minor factor).
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Old 08-08-18, 03:38 PM
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As someone who just went from a Trek FX hybrid to first road bike (Domane SL 5 disc), a few observations:
- My biggest concern was my back, tons of issues over the years and lots of pain, I've held off on making the transition for years. However, I've found the Domane much easier on my back, kind of counter intuitive but especially on climbs, I find the more "aggressive" posture actually seems to help avoid a lot of back pain! I'm actually getting into the drops on climbs as I like how it stretches my back out and gives me another position to get into.
- The bike is so much more "easier" to ride, that I think it helps quite a bit with with speed and fatigue, you hardly feel all the road chatter from bad roads and paths.
- Last and not least, It is just a lot more fun to ride!
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Old 08-08-18, 04:07 PM
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Originally Posted by dvai View Post
I know bikes among classes varies, but as a general rule, are hybrids more comfortable than an endurance road?

Transitioning from a hybrid to an endurance road takes some time?
”Hybrid” is a very broad term that encompasses pretty much any bike with slick(ish) tires and a flat bar. Both of the following are often referred to as "hybrids":





Be more specific if you want a good answer.

Last edited by Kapusta; 08-09-18 at 09:18 AM.
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Old 08-08-18, 05:17 PM
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Like jaycb74, I recently transitioned from a hybrid (Trek DS) to a Trek Domane (ALR 5 Disc). My experience is similar.

I, too, am finding the Domane to be a better ride than the DS. Even without the DS's front shock, the Domane handles rough roads great. I'm not having any back problems with the road bike positioning.

Also, being 10 pounds lighter makes more of a difference than I expected, acceleration is faster and climbs are easier.
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Old 08-08-18, 08:32 PM
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Same as the Trek guys above, I recently went from a Giant Roam Hybrid to a Contend and I much prefer the Contend. I can go on much longer rides with less fatigue in my hands, butt, arms, etc. Not to mention it feels like going from a minivan to a Mustang.
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Old 08-09-18, 05:43 AM
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I think it depends on the person as well. I find road bikes to be comfortable, and I find my aero bike to be more comfortable than my endurance bike. My wife, on the other hand, much prefers her "sit up and beg" style dutch bike. I'm not terribly flexible, and my wife is an ex-professional dancer turned pilates instructor, so a bit more flexible than most.
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Old 08-09-18, 09:24 AM
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Originally Posted by caloso View Post
Personally, I find hybrids to be less comfortable than road bikes because the upright position forces most of your weight on the saddle. But YMMV.
Agreed. The after effects of a 60 mile road bike ride vs a 24mi one on my hybrid is crazy. I recover much better coming off the road bike.

Had i been exposed to drops earlier when getting back to riding, i may have opted for endurance or gravel bike.

Now at start, my core and back were not in shape, so road biking needed that first few weeks to adjust to the position, whereas its easier to get on a flat bar and ride in that sense. But over distance, road bike much more comfortable for me.
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Old 08-09-18, 09:53 AM
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I only have one flat-handle barred bike - a fat bike. I find the hand position and the inability to vary it very uncomfortable. My newest roadbike is an endurance-type frame and it is extremely comfortable.
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Old 08-09-18, 12:25 PM
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Originally Posted by gettingold View Post
I only have one flat-handle barred bike - a fat bike. I find the hand position and the inability to vary it very uncomfortable.
Woodchippers fixed the handlebar situation on my mountain bike. They may be a bit ugly, but after tweaking the position over a few rides are incredibly comfortable.

For the OP, if this is your first drop bar bike, it will probably take a bit of adjustment. I would pick a drop bar over a flat bar though.
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Old 08-09-18, 01:36 PM
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Originally Posted by dvai View Post
I know bikes among classes varies, but as a general rule, are hybrids more comfortable than an endurance road?

Transitioning from a hybrid to an endurance road takes some time?
I have one of each and my personal opinion is no.The hybrid was my first bike as an adult and taking cycling seriously for fitness. The Endurance bike for me personally was wanting something different. I still know quite a few people though that put a lot of miles in on a hybrid, so I guess its a matter of what you want personally. I keep my Hybrid to pull my grandson around in the burly and the dog loves to ride in it also. The combo is also great for running to the grocery store, but when I really want to get out and ride, its the endurance bike for me.
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