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Front disc brake rubbing noise when out of the saddle

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Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Front disc brake rubbing noise when out of the saddle

Old 01-22-20, 12:44 PM
  #26  
eduskator
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Originally Posted by ajbarickman View Post
Thank you all for the quick and super useful feedback.

I think my next steps are going to be 1) Clean and check that the pistons are working properly 2) Adjust the centering by eye to provide the most tolerance 3) Swap front and read rotors to see if anything changes. 4) Increase the distance between pads so that there is more room to accommodate any movement.
Nailed it! I would try #3 first though. It the noise stops, it means time to get a new rotor or try to straighten the existing one. I wouldn't mess with #4 and #2 , you might just to more harm than good, but that's just my opinion.
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Old 01-22-20, 01:06 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by ajbarickman View Post
I don't notice any rubbing during cornering. It definitely could be another noise it is hard to tell.
What I was getting at there is the wheel can shift on a hard turn just like out of the saddle and rub against the rotor too. Same rubbing noise. Trying to adjust or move the piston around manually on hyd brakes won't solve anything, they self adjust right back to where they are going to go after using them again.
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Old 01-22-20, 01:52 PM
  #28  
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Unless I misunderstand the functionality, you can adjust the point at which the lever engages the master cylinder, but not the gap between the pads and rotor.
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Old 01-22-20, 02:29 PM
  #29  
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If the correct spacer block wasn't used during the bleeding procedure, there could be too much fluid in the system resulting in pads that are too close to the disc when the brake lever is released.
In other words, not enough gap between the pads.
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Old 01-22-20, 03:12 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by ckindt View Post
If the correct spacer block wasn't used during the bleeding procedure, there could be too much fluid in the system resulting in pads that are too close to the disc when the brake lever is released.
In other words, not enough gap between the pads.
If that were the case, it would sort itself out as the pads wear or you could simply push in the pads/pistons manually and let them self-adjust when you pump the brake levers. Doesn't seem likely, though, as it's not making noise otherwise and (that I'm aware of) the current gen levers/calipers are coming filled and pre-bled from Shimano.
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Old 01-22-20, 04:19 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
If that were the case, it would sort itself out as the pads wear or you could simply push in the pads/pistons manually and let them self-adjust when you pump the brake levers. Doesn't seem likely, though, as it's not making noise otherwise and (that I'm aware of) the current gen levers/calipers are coming filled and pre-bled from Shimano.
It would only sort itself out as the pads wore, unless you bled some fluid out it has no where to go in a sealed system.
It may not be likely, but it is possible. If the OP has the block that likely came with the bike they could check its fitment. It shouldn't require force to insert it between the pads.
I was never one to trust others' work.
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Old 01-22-20, 04:36 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by ckindt View Post
... unless you bled some fluid out it has no where to go in a sealed system.
There's a reservoir in the hoods, that reservoir is open to the system when the brake lever isn't depressed.
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Old 01-22-20, 05:27 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
There's a reservoir in the hoods, that reservoir is open to the system when the brake lever isn't depressed.
Yes, if you have an open system with a bladder separating the air from the fluid.
No, if you have a closed system with no bladder.
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Old 01-22-20, 05:58 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by ckindt View Post
Yes, if you have an open system with a bladder separating the air from the fluid.
No, if you have a closed system with no bladder.
There's air in the reservoir by design; it's why Shimano tells you not to invert the bike - it might work its way between the lever and caliper and cause sponginess. You wouldn't need to open the system up to push in the pistons and gain another half mm of gap.

Again, there's no rub unless standing - that should tell you that it's not that far off. Recommending that the OP open up the system to remove fluid when there are dozen other exceptionally common explanations is pretty... yeah, not prudent.
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Old 01-22-20, 06:33 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
There's air in the reservoir by design; it's why Shimano tells you not to invert the bike - it might work its way between the lever and caliper and cause sponginess. You wouldn't need to open the system up to push in the pistons and gain another half mm of gap.

Again, there's no rub unless standing - that should tell you that it's not that far off. Recommending that the OP open up the system to remove fluid when there are dozen other exceptionally common explanations is pretty... yeah, not prudent.
I only suggested to check the clearance with the spacer. That's easy enough.
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Old 01-22-20, 11:08 PM
  #36  
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My front rotor rubs when I stand IF I run my front tire pressure somewhere around 75psi or lower. I normally ride 85 rear and 80 front with no issues.

Trek Emonda SLR7 Disc, 58cm
Bontrager Aeolus Pro 3 TLR wheels
Conti 5000 TL tires
I weigh 170 lbs
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Old 01-23-20, 07:27 AM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by Igotdibs View Post
My front rotor rubs when I stand IF I run my front tire pressure somewhere around 75psi or lower. I normally ride 85 rear and 80 front with no issues.

Trek Emonda SLR7 Disc, 58cm
Bontrager Aeolus Pro 3 TLR wheels
Conti 5000 TL tires
I weigh 170 lbs
But does it rub on all the surface, or is it only on a specific area? Is the sound constant or intermittent?

The guy said his rotor was warped - this is the problem.
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Old 01-23-20, 08:13 AM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by eduskator View Post
But does it rub on all the surface, or is it only on a specific area? Is the sound constant or intermittent?

The guy said his rotor was warped - this is the problem.
Only standing and riding hard, only on the down strokes. My point in posting was to illustrate that sometimes it can be such a simple fix... I didn't see where the OP had figured out the problem.
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Old 06-21-20, 11:38 AM
  #39  
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Solved?

Originally Posted by ajbarickman View Post
Thank you all for the quick and super useful feedback.

I think my next steps are going to be 1) Clean and check that the pistons are working properly 2) Adjust the centering by eye to provide the most tolerance 3) Swap front and read rotors to see if anything changes. 4) Increase the distance between pads so that there is more room to accommodate any movement.
Did you solve your issue? I bought the same bike last year. I’ve been struggling with this issue since then and still trying to find the solution on the net... I tried: swapping rotors, re-centering the pads, increasing tyre pressure, I also tested riding without one of the rotor (alternatively). Nothing worked!
It happens when I’m pedaling out of saddle (and pushing). I can’t bear it anymore...
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Old 06-21-20, 02:34 PM
  #40  
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My new Canyon did the same thing when I stomped on the pedals out of the saddle, at first. After a few rides I finally got around to checking things over and snugged up the front through axle. No more rubbing out of the saddle. All I hear now is the drope of the hamer.
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Old 06-21-20, 04:22 PM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by SalsaShark View Post
This happens on one of my bikes, and seems to be caused by the flexing of the frame and fork when applying excess power.
I have the Canyon Ultimate CF SL 8.0 Di2 as well, and there is no brake rub standing, and I regularly put in 700-800W on hill sprints out of the saddle. (And, no, that's not even beer league peak power.)

However, I also make a point not to excessively rock the bike; it might only lean 5-10˚ back and forth, and I pay attention to riding in a straight line. This avoids side loading wheels, hubs, tires, frame, etc, and keeps the sidewalls off the pavement and away from debris. It also makes me ride in a straight line, which is the shortest path between two points, so I cover less distance while more energy is put into propelling me forward as opposed lean angle induced losses. (As a result, it'll feel a little harder. The same reason riding out of the saddle on a trainer feels harder.) And, yes, it requires pulling hard on the bars.

Last edited by sfrider; 06-21-20 at 04:26 PM.
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Old 06-23-20, 01:40 PM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by jfbaraldi View Post
Did you solve your issue? I bought the same bike last year. I’ve been struggling with this issue since then and still trying to find the solution on the net... I tried: swapping rotors, re-centering the pads, increasing tyre pressure, I also tested riding without one of the rotor (alternatively). Nothing worked!
It happens when I’m pedaling out of saddle (and pushing). I can’t bear it anymore...
Hello. Kind of... I straightened my rotors, adjusted the brakes as best I could on a stand and then just tried to ignore it. After a bit, the sound went away. I do notice that each time I put my wheel on I have to live with a similar noise for a bit of my ride until it seats itself properly again. Super frustrating for sure.
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Old 07-02-20, 05:12 PM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by Dean V View Post
I would ride it for a few weeks and see if improves with the pads bedding in.
My Domane did.
Same here. When new, the disc rubbed a bit when out of the saddle.
After 60 miles, the issue resolved. Note the rub was VERY mild
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Old 07-05-20, 12:20 PM
  #44  
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Here's an exercise: get out of the saddle on a hill, DON'T rock the bike, keep it as upright as possible, and try to ride in a straight line. If you draw a line where you tires went, it should be straight. No weaving. Yes, it will be harder than if you rock the bike, but the reason for this is you put your energy into moving the bike forward up the hill. In addition, it forces you to counteract the rocking motion with your core muscles and shoulders, engaging a wider spectrum of muscles. And indeed it will be harder initially. But you may find even dropping one gear it's sufficiently more efficient to be worthwhile, not just because you put your effort where it matters, but also because you're not trying to ride your bike tilted; even high end wheels and frames that do relatively well tilted will do better upright.
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Old 07-05-20, 02:51 PM
  #45  
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My Canyon Ultimate does this as well when standing and cranking. I would just ignore it, honestly. I stopped chasing disc brake noises a long time ago. There’s always something.
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