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Titanium for a gravel/road bike?

Cyclocross and Gravelbiking (Recreational) This has to be the most physically intense sport ever invented. It's high speed bicycle racing on a short off road course or riding the off pavement rides on gravel like :The Dirty Kanza". We also have a dedicated Racing forum for the Cyclocross Hard Core Racers.

Titanium for a gravel/road bike?

Old 07-06-18, 09:59 AM
  #26  
Seattle Forrest
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Originally Posted by Banzai View Post
Steel. Ti is marginally lighter than good steel. If it's a lot lighter, it's a lot flexier, typically, due to tube diameters. The biggest benefit of Ti (and it's a big one) is that Ti doesn't rust. Depending on your ride conditions, that counts for something.
The Pacific Northwest region seconds this comment.
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Old 07-06-18, 08:27 PM
  #27  
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Something that rides a lot like steel, can be designed a bit lighter and doesn't corrode as easily sounds great. I doubt I'll ever be able to pick a geometry and set of features I know I'll like long enough to have it made in Ti, but the appeal is clear to me.

I wouldn't kick one out of bed, but if I had a new one handed to me I'd be as likely to sell it as ride it.
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Old 07-08-18, 04:40 PM
  #28  
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I skimmed the rest of the posts but the title got my attention as it was something I'd been looking at ... there's a slightly older and absolutely lovely guy I've known for a few years and has been into his cycling forever ... way before I became serious about it.

I bumped into him the other day and asked what he rode and he said gravel bike not expecting me to know what it was and I reeled off the list I was looking at with a view to buying, he's an expensive Ti and also a 600 Boardman CX and his advice was don't waste your money .... the 600 is just as good.

Now I'm sure there are differences but at the end of the day if you just want it to do a job ... that said we all know how addictive this hobby can be and unless you've tried it you'll never be content much as he obviously did.
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Old 07-10-18, 01:49 PM
  #29  
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Y'all know this thread is over a year old, right?

The big negative on Ti is the difficulty in finding one for test riding.

I do chuckle at the comments “my TI rides better than…”

Its hard to compare Ti to carbon, as you can make carbon anything you want. Plenty of post say that “my TI is more comfortable than my carbon” yet until recently the fad in carbon was to make them super stiff. Now the fad is to make Carbon comfortable (thank goodness). And yes, there are TI bikes out there that are way too stiff. There is so much more to bike design than just material.

I would like to see a TI bike that is more comfortable than something like a carbon Niner RLT RDO.

I’m tempted by a “frame for a lifetime” claim but I have plenty of really nice older frames that are just obsolete (due to component requirements) even though they are in great shape.
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Old 07-10-18, 02:51 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by chas58 View Post

I would like to see a TI bike that is more comfortable than something like a carbon Niner RLT RDO.
after riding the same wheels, same group, same tires back to back RLT RDO and the RLT 853..... the 853 is far more comfortable.

imo the argument should be Ti vs 853 rather than carbon. Both frames will be obsolete before the 853 frame rust out. I had no interest in steel until I rode the 853 RLT.
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Old 07-10-18, 03:05 PM
  #31  
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Titanium for Cycling | Steve Tilford
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Old 07-14-18, 12:47 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by Metieval View Post
after riding the same wheels, same group, same tires back to back RLT RDO and the RLT 853..... the 853 is far more comfortable.

imo the argument should be Ti vs 853 rather than carbon. Both frames will be obsolete before the 853 frame rust out. I had no interest in steel until I rode the 853 RLT.
Might as well throw 631, 520 and heck even 4130 in the mix as all steel alloys ride the same given the geo, wall thickness and tube diameter is the same. You can get the RLT Steel frameset for around 1200 on Backcountry/competitive cyclist. It is a sweet bike for sure, but I would have a hard time not going for a custom geometry Gunnar at that price. For $850 you can get a Jamis Renegade 631 frameset with VERY similar geometry to the Niner.

Also, Ti made it's name in the bike scene when the material was produced exclusively for aerospace. As such, tolerances were very strict. Nowadays, tubes are made specifically for bike frames and the need for 100 percent accurate composition has gone down brought quality with it. Pretty important when considering Ti. Ti isn't forgiving of less than ideal frame building techniques, tools and environments. These are some reasons why we see cracked titanium frames all over the forums. Ti is only a lifetime frame when built with proper tooling, environment, welding etc. Otherwise a mass produced steel frame will outlast it and probably even the owner given proper maintenance (frame saver every year). If I had less than 3-4 grand to spend on a frame, Ti would not be not be it. Perhaps a Waterford Reynolds Stainless would be nice at that price point. For me when it comes to Ti, its top end (Seven, Moots, Firefly etc) or nothing.
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Old 07-14-18, 10:12 PM
  #33  
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Anyone ridden the LightSpeed Gravel?
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Old 07-15-18, 09:24 AM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by Sully151 View Post
Anyone ridden the LightSpeed Gravel?
I've got the Litespeed gravel and can't say enough good things about this bike. I've ridden the bike since last summer and it performs great.

Feel free to pm if you have any questions.
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