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Stroke survivor biking?

Old 01-24-19, 08:03 PM
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Woodsman Rick
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Stroke survivor biking?

My adult son had a stroke a couple of years back. Hes no longer in a wheelchair and gets around pretty well with a walking stick. His left arm and leg do not have full function. Not much at all really.

Any ideas for him to be able to cycle? Maybe a trike? If possible Im sure it could be a wonderful thing for him! Any other stroke survivor cyclists out there?

Thanks for any ideas!
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Old 01-24-19, 08:54 PM
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Kent T
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A trike or handcycle is a possible solution. There is adaptive equipment out there, and ways to get him cycling. It's great exercise (PT in a more fun way). Seeing scenery is also good.
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Old 01-25-19, 09:55 PM
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Rowan
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Sorry if this seems pain in the ass, but the medical people and his current heart and brain conditions are OK with the exercise?*

The trike idea seems logical and appropriate for him. There is the ability to sit and stand from a quite low position, but if he is determined, I cannot of anything getting him defeated by this.

The trike idea seems best at initially because it overcomes the issues related to balance,manouvrability, and protection against any further medical issues should be fall and hit his head. And while there are differences in people's thoughts on this, having him wear a safety helmet irrespective of whether it's one a trike, is remains an important think.

* Go see the thread about me titled "Rowan" in the 50 Plus Forum if you don't think I could offer any knowledge about this sort of subject. The thread does show that I am also a recovered cyclist, who is back on his ordinary bicycles and covered up to 40km in one ride.
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Old 01-25-19, 10:28 PM
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A friend of my son's is similarly situated. He is recovering from a stroke, but it has impaired his balance and coordination. For that reason, a recumbent tricycle (I think Catrike) was the best solution. It is worth getting a good one, and being able to try before you buy. It might also be something an insurance plan would be willing to contribute to. Good luck to your son.
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Old 01-26-19, 12:29 AM
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Rowan
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Originally Posted by wgscott View Post
A friend of my son's is similarly situated. He is recovering from a stroke, but it has impaired his balance and coordination. For that reason, a recumbent tricycle (I think Catrike) was the best solution. It is worth getting a good one, and being able to try before you buy. It might also be something an insurance plan would be willing to contribute to. Good luck to your son.
My father-in-law has a Catrike, and it's one of the best of its type I have ridden. And indeed, it is all about getting a good one, irrespective of whether Catrike or another similar-quality brand..
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Old 01-27-19, 05:59 AM
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I don't have much advice to offer, but wanted to say that I occasionally ride with a guy who had a stroke. He's about 39 or so, and had a stroke when he was 32. I've never talked with him much about how he was able to get back on a bike, but he was - both road and mountain. Prior to his stroke he was apparently an extremely competitive racer. I believe it took him years to be able to ride again but he was determined.

He has difficulty clipping into his pedals - yes he still uses clipless for both road and mtb - and he sometimes has trouble shifting on his bad side. Things like changing a flat are challenging for him as well. Not much else I can offer, just an example of someone who was able to get back to riding a traditional bicycle. Obviously every person is different - best of luck.
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Old 01-27-19, 09:01 AM
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Kent T
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I have Cerebral Palsy, which has many of the same issues as stroke people deal with, my right leg is weaker than the left. I ride a normal Mountain Bike, a Trek 800 series singletrack. I do fine on it. But my situation is different but has some things in common, spasticity is a big issue with stroke and CP.
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Old 01-28-19, 03:34 PM
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There are higher seating recumbent trikes like the Catrike Villager that don't require the rider to get out of a very low seat. The Villager isn't cheap but is of decent quality and good reliability. Be wary of entry level recumbent trikes. While cheaper than a Catrike they are also a lot heavier and often equipped with dismal gear ranges and the lowest quality components. You don't get the amazing stability of a very low trike but the handling is still very good. There are many stories on Bentrideronline (bentrideronline.com) from handicapped riders including stroke recoveries and the ways they got around the impediments. Special pedals that keep the weaker foot on the pedal comes to mind as one of the accommodations. You need some way to keep your feet on the pedals while moving to avoid "foot suck" where the foot drops to the ground and your leg gets caught by the frame.
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Old 02-03-19, 06:58 PM
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Thank You!

Thank you all for your replies. It sounds like a trike will be what is needed. We will explore and look for hands-on opportunities when the weather is more favorable. Thanks again!
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