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The Ultimate Bike

Old 10-19-13, 04:24 AM
  #76  
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Originally Posted by vijinho View Post
The Charge Plug 5 2014 is a great all-round bike, steel for longevity, disc brakes and with an SRAM groupset. http://www.chargebikes.com/bicycle-collection/plug-5
I like the looks of that, and I know its silly, but I like their graphics. I watched on of the videos (girl with cat) and it's great to see someone ride somewhat off road with the road looking bike (really looked like a cross bike). Will watch the rest later.
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Old 10-19-13, 04:27 AM
  #77  
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Originally Posted by mconlonx View Post
This is true of BB7 mtn brakes, but BB7R (road) do suck.
Hmmmmmmm.....I put them on my Vaya (adjusted them then), I squeeze the little brake levers when I need to stop, and I stop (or slow as needed), and have done so for 2 years now.

Edit-My bad - I didn't see that you were referring to the road version.
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Old 10-19-13, 05:04 PM
  #78  
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Originally Posted by ninevictor View Post
Ridefreemc, I like your taste in ultimate bikes!

Here's my ultimate commuter:

KVA MS2 stainless steel frame
Gates Carbon Drive
Shimano Alfine 11 Di2
BB7 S Road disc brakes
Stan's ZTR Alpha 340 Disc tubeless rims
Hutchison Secteur 28c tubeless tires

This may end up as a double post and if so sorry.

If you don't mind sharing, what made you go for the KVA? I like the bike and it appears as though the ss is well thought out for use as bicycle frame material. I love the Seven, but if one can get a great quality frame for a reasonable price why not? $3,600 for the Seven frame is hard for me to justify - even for an "ultimate" bike.

I had a Litespeed and although they did a nice clean job on the frame I went back to a full carbon Trek and loved the difference (road bike - 5200).
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Old 10-19-13, 05:11 PM
  #79  
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Tt_sr_gt

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Old 10-19-13, 05:15 PM
  #80  
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Originally Posted by spare_wheel View Post
the only reason bb7s have a following is because at one time they were the only functional disc brake with brifter compatibility. while i am sure crappy no-name hydraulics exist, imo, even bottom end shimano, avid, or hayes hydraulics are simply on another level. heck, the new shimano slx is far better than my old 765s.
OHH, I get it -- because other brakes are better, BB7's are crap, and are resting on old laurels. Bullpucky.

Avid's Elixir line has shown some serious issues with reliability; some have been traced to a bad rotor, but others are simply erratic quality. I've looked hard at the Codes, Code R's, Saints, and Hope M4's, but I'm still on BB7's. Near-effortless 1- OR 2-finger stopping, rare maintenance needs, even rarer noises. Right now, the only shortfall I have with them is the absence of ceramic pads, since I wore the last set out. But I have a line on more.

Like what you like, use what you use, have whatever OPINION you like; just keep it real.
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Old 10-19-13, 07:33 PM
  #81  
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Originally Posted by acidfast7 View Post
Tt_sr_gt

NICE! What is it? I cannot enlarge it enough to read the frame.
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Old 10-19-13, 10:46 PM
  #82  
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That's a Tout Terrain Silk Road GT. Despite the French name ("tout terrain" means "all terrain"), it's actually a German bike. Very good quality, innovative, durable, and on the high end of the cost spectrum. As you can see, the rear rack is an extension of the frame. For touring, these bikes are on the same level as, say, a Co-Motion or a Thorn.

http://www.en.tout-terrain.de/bicycl...d-silkroad-gt/
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Old 10-19-13, 11:06 PM
  #83  
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For commuting my Moulton hits all the right buttons... it is the perfect all rounder and is fast, comfortable, and rides beautifully.



If I was to tour on it I'd be looking at using a wider range hub but I built my P20 for that... it will soon be getting a new 8 speed wheelset and hub generator.



But it is a good thing that one does not have to limit oneself to one, or two, or twenty bikes as tomorrow we are going to go and hit the trails and for that you need different tools.
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Old 10-20-13, 04:29 PM
  #84  
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Originally Posted by DX-MAN View Post
OHH, I get it -- because other brakes are better, BB7's are crap, and are resting on old laurels. Bullpucky.

Avid's Elixir line has shown some serious issues with reliability; some have been traced to a bad rotor, but others are simply erratic quality. I've looked hard at the Codes, Code R's, Saints, and Hope M4's, but I'm still on BB7's. Near-effortless 1- OR 2-finger stopping, rare maintenance needs, even rarer noises. Right now, the only shortfall I have with them is the absence of ceramic pads, since I wore the last set out. But I have a line on more.

Like what you like, use what you use, have whatever OPINION you like; just keep it real.
my 775s are better than my 765s which were better than my deore lxs. bb7s, on the other hand, have not seen anything other than cosmetic updates for almost a decade.
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Old 10-21-13, 11:52 PM
  #85  
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Originally Posted by Ridefreemc View Post
This may end up as a double post and if so sorry.

If you don't mind sharing, what made you go for the KVA? I like the bike and it appears as though the ss is well thought out for use as bicycle frame material. I love the Seven, but if one can get a great quality frame for a reasonable price why not? $3,600 for the Seven frame is hard for me to justify - even for an "ultimate" bike.

I had a Litespeed and although they did a nice clean job on the frame I went back to a full carbon Trek and loved the difference (road bike - 5200).
I decided on the KVA because I already have a Seven Ti frame. I knew I wanted a corrosion resistant material and I liked what the builder had to say about the KVA's hardness, stiffness and weight compared to a comparably equipped 3.5AL-2.5V Ti frame so that is what made me decide on the KVA SS.
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Old 10-22-13, 06:31 AM
  #86  
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Originally Posted by ninevictor View Post
I decided on the KVA because I already have a Seven Ti frame. I knew I wanted a corrosion resistant material and I liked what the builder had to say about the KVA's hardness, stiffness and weight compared to a comparably equipped 3.5AL-2.5V Ti frame so that is what made me decide on the KVA SS.
Ooohhhh, now you have really peaked my interest in this "Ultimate Bike" thread! Or, maybe you can help me narrow my ideas. (I got your PM so no need to go into too much detail unless you want to keep others up to speed).

I like the idea of a Seven Ti because of the care in putting the bike together. It feels good to ride something that is put together well - - not sure why, but it does. That is somewhat like when you clean and wax your car if seems to run better I liked that about my Litespeed (although the Seven is much higher on that scale), but I didn't like the way the bike felt when I rode it - just didn't feel good to me (hard to describe). I much preferred my carbon Trek.

I don't have a "road" specific bike anymore and ride my Vaya mostly, which I would consider much more versatile. If I go with a new bike it will have similar versatility - that is, the ability to go touring (not fully loaded), do some trail riding, some longer recreational rides, and take me back and forth to work - all in a comfortably, but lively fashion. When I found a KVA SS and Reynolds 953 SS builder that said their "all-round" bike was popular I saved his website. However, his prices are similar to the Seven prices - ouch!

I like the idea of larger tires as I run 40mm wide Schwalbe Supremes now and would probably go with 35s next, even though that might hurt my riding in light sand. Therefore, the bike would need to be a little more robust than the typical touring bike (that usually only allows up to about 32 or 28mm). I guess much like my Vaya, but only nicer
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Old 10-22-13, 06:33 AM
  #87  
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Originally Posted by Ridefreemc View Post
NICE! What is it? I cannot enlarge it enough to read the frame.
tout terrain

http://www.tout-terrain.de/
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Old 10-22-13, 08:47 AM
  #88  
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Originally Posted by spare_wheel View Post
Avid BB7s are bottom of the barrel disc brakes. Now that road hydro options are readily available I have no idea why someone would consider them part of an "ultimate" build.
Right off the bat, don't have bb7's myself.
Do run AP Racing hydraulics, Juicy7's, and Magura hydraulic rim brakes, though.
The advantage to the bb7's ?
Two points to adjust the tow/set. Very adjustable, in mechanical disc brake world.
Cable pull. No hydraulics or lines to deal with. Sticky pistons, etc.
More than enough stopping power for the real world.
Pads are cheap and easy to find at any LBS.
My most expensive disc brakes, AP Racing, are the least adjustable and most prone to drag.
Thought of switching them to bb7's, actually.
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Old 10-22-13, 09:14 AM
  #89  
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Originally Posted by AusTexMurf View Post
Right off the bat, don't have bb7's myself.
Do run AP Racing hydraulics, Juicy7's, and Magura hydraulic rim brakes, though.
The advantage to the bb7's ?
Two points to adjust the tow/set. Very adjustable, in mechanical disc brake world.
Cable pull. No hydraulics or lines to deal with. Sticky pistons, etc.
More than enough stopping power for the real world.
Pads are cheap and easy to find at any LBS.
My most expensive disc brakes, AP Racing, are the least adjustable and most prone to drag.
Thought of switching them to bb7's, actually.
I owned a juicy and it had the same pads as my now retired bb7. And I did a little happy dance when I retired those pieces of junk.

I never adjust my hydraulic disc brakes. Never. I simply pop out the old pads, push back the calipers, pop in a new pair of pads, and squeeze the brake levers. 2 minutes and done. When I owned bb7s I had to constantly adjust the two little knobbies. Bb7s also warped my rotors over time.

And it blows me away that someone would talk about cables as an advantage. Having to change brake cables is a pain -- especially if you have internal routing. I never change hydraulic fluid on my brakes. Mineral oil is inert, heat resistant, and I figure I'll probably upgrade in 5-7 years anyways.

I buy semi-metallic pads for $8-10 a piece online but just about every bike store carries new and old shimano deore/lx/slx/xt/xtr pads.

I've never heard of ap racing brakes for a non-motorised vehicle.
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Old 10-22-13, 09:24 AM
  #90  
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I have a lot of bikes I like for different reasons - my most versatile...and the one I'd keep if I could only keep one...is probably this one:

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Old 10-22-13, 01:53 PM
  #91  
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For all you cable "brifter" equipped disc brake lovers, check out TRP's HY/RD calipers. I upgraded to those from Avid BB7S Road calipers and absolutely love them.
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Old 10-23-13, 11:26 PM
  #92  
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Originally Posted by ninevictor View Post
For all you cable "brifter" equipped disc brake lovers, check out TRP's HY/RD calipers. I upgraded to those from Avid BB7S Road calipers and absolutely love them.
Nice!
I might try it. Maybe after the coming Holidays.
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Old 10-24-13, 12:09 AM
  #93  
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Originally Posted by KonAaron Snake View Post
I have a lot of bikes I like for different reasons - my most versatile...and the one I'd keep if I could only keep one...is probably this one:

Considering how nice a collection of bikes you have, this speaks well of the Koga and they really are some of the nicest bicycles I have ever had the pleasure to play with.

If I was going to keep one bike it would have to be Forrest (my custom P20) as I put a lot of blood, sweat, and gears into that bike and he has carried me a long ways.
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Old 10-24-13, 05:06 AM
  #94  
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Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver View Post
Considering how nice a collection of bikes you have, this speaks well of the Koga and they really are some of the nicest bicycles I have ever had the pleasure to play with.

If I was going to keep one bike it would have to be Forrest (my custom P20) as I put a lot of blood, sweat, and gears into that bike and he has carried me a long ways.
You know the rules - photo please ( though I know that bike well and love your build).

I've ridden a bike or two, and I very much love Miyatas. I could get by with just the Koga, one roadie and a tandem.
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Old 10-24-13, 06:32 AM
  #95  
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Originally Posted by jeffpoulin View Post
That's a Tout Terrain Silk Road GT. Despite the French name ("tout terrain" means "all terrain"), it's actually a German bike. Very good quality, innovative, durable, and on the high end of the cost spectrum. As you can see, the rear rack is an extension of the frame. For touring, these bikes are on the same level as, say, a Co-Motion or a Thorn.

http://www.en.tout-terrain.de/bicycl...d-silkroad-gt/
Once a car hit me and rack was busted - but the frame was OK. So this is not an extremely good idea, is it? Hmm?
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Old 10-24-13, 06:34 AM
  #96  
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I've taken my inquiries about the "Ultimate Bike" a bit further, and thanks to ninevictor I have gotten in touch with a very responsive frame builder. I love the looks of the stainless steel frame and the idea that they would be very durable (as compared to a painted frame). After talking with the builder I probably won't consider SS for me though, mainly due to the statement that it is a stiffer material and probably not what I'm looking for in ride characteristics. Great for other purposes, but not for mine.

The suggestion was to go with Ti as it has the characteristics I'm interested in, along with the durability factor. I really like my CroMo Vaya and take great care of it so it is in perfect condition. However, I do fret about it a bit and would not like to get that first big scratch on it. In fact I don't ride it certain places that don't have safe places to sit it (because of the possibilty of it getting beat up against a metal sign for example). With the larger Schwalbe tires it does not fit into certain bike racks so I have to look for other options (until I get my kickstand!, but that's another thread unto itself). It's not that I'd abuse a Ti frame, but I wouldn't worry about it quite as much.

One thing that it holding me back on going Ti (well, besides the cost) is my previous experience with a Litespeed Ti frame (road bike configuration). It was a beautiful bike, but it just didn't ride great in my opinion. This could have been due to the wheel selection or the tires or any combination of factors, but I attribute the ride to the Ti in my mind and therefore have some hesitation.

Can those of you that have Ti, or have ridden Ti chime in? Should I stick with an awesome build in steel? Maybe powder coat instead of paint?

I'm still looking at a IGH, belt drive, and discs though - love the looks and simplicity.
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Old 10-24-13, 07:21 AM
  #97  
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At this point in time; the ultimate bike is my Brompton. Mostly because it doesn't give me an excuse not to ride anymore. I can take it inside stores, ride to work, do longer rides when I feel like it and most importantly, transport it very easily when I have to.
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Old 10-24-13, 07:32 AM
  #98  
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Originally Posted by Ridefreemc View Post
I've taken my inquiries about the "Ultimate Bike" a bit further, and thanks to ninevictor I have gotten in touch with a very responsive frame builder. I love the looks of the stainless steel frame and the idea that they would be very durable (as compared to a painted frame). After talking with the builder I probably won't consider SS for me though, mainly due to the statement that it is a stiffer material and probably not what I'm looking for in ride characteristics. Great for other purposes, but not for mine.

The suggestion was to go with Ti as it has the characteristics I'm interested in, along with the durability factor. I really like my CroMo Vaya and take great care of it so it is in perfect condition. However, I do fret about it a bit and would not like to get that first big scratch on it. In fact I don't ride it certain places that don't have safe places to sit it (because of the possibilty of it getting beat up against a metal sign for example). With the larger Schwalbe tires it does not fit into certain bike racks so I have to look for other options (until I get my kickstand!, but that's another thread unto itself). It's not that I'd abuse a Ti frame, but I wouldn't worry about it quite as much.

One thing that it holding me back on going Ti (well, besides the cost) is my previous experience with a Litespeed Ti frame (road bike configuration). It was a beautiful bike, but it just didn't ride great in my opinion. This could have been due to the wheel selection or the tires or any combination of factors, but I attribute the ride to the Ti in my mind and therefore have some hesitation.

Can those of you that have Ti, or have ridden Ti chime in? Should I stick with an awesome build in steel? Maybe powder coat instead of paint?

I'm still looking at a IGH, belt drive, and discs though - love the looks and simplicity.
I've owned 5 ti bikes and currently own three...my two Litespeed built ti road frames were total dogs and very flexie (both sold). My Merlin is an absolute joy. The De Rosa Titanio is somehere in between. It's the builder, not the material.

Which era of Litespeed was this? Lynskey or post-Lynskey? People make too much out of materials - it's all about the builder matching a tool to your preferences. You can undoubtedly get a fine bicycle from steel or ti.

The advantages to ti are:

No paint chips - no worry about leaning it and parking it.
Slight weight savings - not significant to me.
Great as rain/winter bikes because they're totally immune to oxidation.

The disadvantages are:

Cost.
Harder to cold set (though some steels also can't be cold set).
I prefer the aesthetics of lugs.
Fewer builders working in it.

I think because ti is newer, and because it can be more difficult to work with (and less forgiving of errors) I'd be very limited with who I bought a ti frame from. I'd really stick to the big names - Moots, Firefly, IF, Seven, Spectrum...and that's about it. I know that I left one or two off.

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Old 10-24-13, 07:44 AM
  #99  
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Originally Posted by aadhils View Post
At this point in time; the ultimate bike is my Brompton. Mostly because it doesn't give me an excuse not to ride anymore. I can take it inside stores, ride to work, do longer rides when I feel like it and most importantly, transport it very easily when I have to.
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Old 10-24-13, 07:45 AM
  #100  
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Originally Posted by KonAaron Snake View Post
I've owned 5 ti bikes and currently own three...my two Litespeed built ti road frames were total dogs and very flexie (both sold). Which era of Litespeed was this? Lynskey or post-Lynskey? People make too much out of materials - it's all about the builder matching a tool to your preferences. You can undoubtedly get a fine bicycle from steel or ti.

The advantages to ti are:

No paint chips - no worry about leaning it and parking it.
Slight weight savings - not significant to me.
Great as rain/winter bikes because they're totally immune to oxidation.

The disadvantages are:

Cost.
Harder to cold set (though some steels also can't be cold set).
I prefer the aesthetics of lugs.
Fewer builders working in it.

I think because ti is newer, and because it can be more difficult to work with (and less forgiving of errors) I'd be very limited with who I bought a ti frame from. I'd really stick to the big names - Moots, Firefly, IF, Seven, Spectrum...and that's about it. I know that I left one or two off.
Not sure which build the Litespeed was, but the year was probably about late-2005. I guess I'm glad to hear you say that though and now I probably don't need to discount the material because of my experience with the Litespeed.
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Last edited by Ridefreemc; 10-24-13 at 08:02 AM.
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