Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Suggestions for doing my own Frankenbike?

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Suggestions for doing my own Frankenbike?

Old 06-26-19, 10:39 PM
  #1  
BookFinder 
Lifelong wheel gazer ...
Thread Starter
 
BookFinder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Lower US 48
Posts: 287

Bikes: 4 good ones, 1 junker

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
Liked 17 Times in 12 Posts
Suggestions for doing my own Frankenbike?

Been thinking I want a new bike, but something inside of me is resisting going to the store and just picking something.

Iíve long done my own motorcycle and (very basic) bicycle maintenance, but Iíve never built a bike. Looking at my harem I have a mid 1980ís Cannondale police bike that is worn out. The frame is in good shape, but the rest of it needs a do-over.

Then I have the Giant TCR1 that I rarely ride anymore. The components are ultegra, and could be moved to the Cannondale frame.

My questions are several:
1. What tools would I need to do this chore?
2. Can any of you steer me to a well-produced YouTube series on bike mechanicking?
3. What other suggestions might be hidden in the resident brain trust?

Thanks in advance,

Rick
__________________
Current bikes: '80's era Cannondale police bike; '03 Schwinn mongrel MTB; '03 Specialized Hard Rock (the wife's)
Past bikes: '97 Giant ATX 840 project bike; '01 Giant TCR1 SL; and a truckload of miscellaneous bikes used up by the kids and grand-kids

Status quo is the mental bastion of the intellectually lethargic...
BookFinder is offline  
Old 06-26-19, 11:20 PM
  #2  
Retro Grouch 
Senior Member
 
Retro Grouch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: St Peters, Missouri
Posts: 29,386

Bikes: Catrike 559 I own some others but they don't get ridden very much.

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1214 Post(s)
Liked 67 Times in 52 Posts
Just do it! Learn and tool up as you go.

(Hint: Before doing anything else, measure the distance between the dropouts of your two bikes. Everything on a bike works together so mixing and matching parts can lead to some interesting problems for you to solve.)

I think you are embarking on a fun project.
__________________
My greatest fear is all of my kids standing around my coffin and talking about "how sensible" dad was.
Retro Grouch is offline  
Old 06-27-19, 04:24 AM
  #3  
frankenmike 
mechanically sound
 
frankenmike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Dover, NH
Posts: 1,496

Bikes: Indy Fab steel deluxe, Aventon cordoba, S-works stumpy fsr, Masi vincere, 92 Hardrock commuter, Dahon mu uno, Outcast 29

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 44 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 7 Posts
I’d advise doing some reading of Sheldon Brown’s articles. Lots of good info there for diy bike stuff.
__________________
frankenmike is offline  
Likes For frankenmike:
Old 06-27-19, 05:20 AM
  #4  
GrainBrain
Senior Member
 
GrainBrain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Central Io-way
Posts: 1,321

Bikes: LeMond Zurich, Giant Talon 29er

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 687 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 54 Times in 38 Posts
Look for a co-op nearby. The one I go to has multiple workbenches all stocked with specialty tools, plus other specialty tools you'd use once and awhile. You can rent a bench by the hour or purchase a years membership for something like $40-$60. The volunteers and employees that staff it are knowledgeable and can answer any question but you're required to do all the wrenching.
GrainBrain is offline  
Old 06-27-19, 06:32 AM
  #5  
2old
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 1,675
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 239 Post(s)
Liked 20 Times in 19 Posts
IMO, the tools, basic allen wrenches, screwdrivers and maybe wrenches are neither esoteric nor expensive, so the only "bike-specific" items you need are for crank & bottom bracket removal (Park, about $10 each), a chain whip and cassette tool ($25 for the pair), possibly cable cutters (Park $25 or so) and you can continue to service your bike(s) from now on. Maybe, eventually you'll procure a bike stand, but you don't need one immediately.
2old is online now  
Old 06-27-19, 07:30 AM
  #6  
BookFinder 
Lifelong wheel gazer ...
Thread Starter
 
BookFinder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Lower US 48
Posts: 287

Bikes: 4 good ones, 1 junker

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
Liked 17 Times in 12 Posts
Thanks to all for the feedback. I'm starting to formulate a plan, and will look into the co-op thing.

It may be after Labor Day before I get started, but I'll take photos and update this once I get under way.

Thanks again, and best to all!
__________________
Current bikes: '80's era Cannondale police bike; '03 Schwinn mongrel MTB; '03 Specialized Hard Rock (the wife's)
Past bikes: '97 Giant ATX 840 project bike; '01 Giant TCR1 SL; and a truckload of miscellaneous bikes used up by the kids and grand-kids

Status quo is the mental bastion of the intellectually lethargic...
BookFinder is offline  
Old 06-27-19, 08:07 AM
  #7  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 9,600

Bikes: Centurion Ironman, Trek 5900, Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel

Mentioned: 171 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2949 Post(s)
Liked 289 Times in 216 Posts
RJ the Bike Guy on YouTube. Lots of complete bike rebuilds, repurposing and makeovers.
canklecat is offline  
Likes For canklecat:
Old 06-27-19, 03:48 PM
  #8  
Last ride 76 
Senior Member
 
Last ride 76's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Just moved...1 km S. Now above the "Bike Path" ( River Road, Piermont, NY)
Posts: 1,206

Bikes: Old Bikes: '74 Ron Cooper, Crashed and repaired '76, restored 2015!!! need restoration '74 Witcomb track bike (bought in '75) '75 Carlsbad Masi, bought in '76 New bikes: 84-85 Gios torino "Professional" '76 Olmo Competition C Titiano

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 245 Post(s)
Liked 92 Times in 74 Posts
Originally Posted by frankenmike View Post
Iíd advise doing some reading of Sheldon Brownís articles. Lots of good info there for diy bike stuff.
+1 for older bikes, you can probably find what you need to know.
I've built 2 frankenbikes, and really enjoyed it.
Last ride 76 is offline  
Old 06-28-19, 12:46 AM
  #9  
jimc101
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: West Yorkshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 5,496
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 311 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Before doing anything, would be taking some basic measurements of dropouts on the Cannondale & Giant, if it's 126mm at the back, then you're going to run into issues (cold setting Aluminium, your choice, but many don't like the idea), 130mm will be fine, also the seat tube, and brake specs, may not be compatible between the 2 frames.
jimc101 is offline  
Likes For jimc101:
Old 06-28-19, 12:55 AM
  #10  
cpach
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Mt Shasta, CA, USA
Posts: 1,267

Bikes: Too many. Cannondale SuperSix, Trek Remedy 8, Trek Crossrip+ get the most ride time.

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 255 Post(s)
Liked 29 Times in 26 Posts
You do you, but that seems like a strange choice. The TCR is a nice bike, why cannibalize it?

A lot can be accomplished with metric hex wrenches, a screwdriver, and some metric open wrenches, but you'll probably need appropriate bottom bracket tools, a chain tool, and cassette tool and chain whip.

You won't be able to put a modern cassette on the original Cannondale wheels probably. Getting a modern drivetrain on that bike may be a challenge. It is likely that the rear hub spacing is 130mm, which is the 6/7 mtb standard and the current road standard. Since the frame is aluminum it cannot be respaced. You may need to build a 26" rim to a road hub, or find a 135 spaced 26" wheel and remove 5mm of spacers and redish the wheel.

I recommend Sheldon Brown for general information and for reference, and Park tool for specific procedure instruction. The park site is nice because they have video as well as good, written descriptions with pictures.
cpach is offline  
Old 06-28-19, 08:27 AM
  #11  
Litespud
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Chapel Hill NC
Posts: 404

Bikes: 2000 Litespeed Vortex Chorus 10, 1995 DeBernardi Cromor fixie

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 149 Post(s)
Liked 50 Times in 31 Posts
When I read the title, I thought you were planning to build some weird cross-genre machine, like a fat-bike with Chorus 11, or a full-suspension road fixie. As it turns out, you're just building a bike. I did this for the first time back when friction shifting meant that component compatibility wasn't really an issue. and I have built every one of my bikes since. Ask questions, watch youtube, and don't spend money on any tool or component until you're absolutely sure it's right for its intended purpose.
Litespud is offline  
Old 06-28-19, 10:23 PM
  #12  
Litespud
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Chapel Hill NC
Posts: 404

Bikes: 2000 Litespeed Vortex Chorus 10, 1995 DeBernardi Cromor fixie

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 149 Post(s)
Liked 50 Times in 31 Posts
Originally Posted by Last ride 76 View Post
Excuse me?
1) Component comparability has ALWAYS been an issue. An aesthetic issue. One does not just throw random vintage parts on a frame from the days of toe clips just because they can function together. DA does not go on Italian bikes from the '70s. That is the very definition of a "Frankenbike" in it's most negative aspect.

2) Don't spend money on any tool or component until you're absolutely sure it's right for its intended purpose? Say Whaaat? How is one ever going to make progress on N+1, if not by impulsively buying frames, calipers, cranks, derailleurs, and even bottom brackets, just because they might be wanted someday. And that leaves out whole bicycles and WHEELS, my God, how could you leave out wheels???

I bought my Litespeed Blade, a bare frame, because it was there. It went from having Spinergy wheels (off a Kestrel), to Zipp 400s, to a rear disc, to specialized tri-spoke wheels (now on that KKestrel) and currently sporting Corima carbon clinchers. Imagine it with a pair of Mad Fibers...

My point is, if I had not been infatuated with the beauty of these wheels, etc. I never would have put together or ridden (for a time) three very different world-class (in their day) TT bikes. I feel richer, and lucky for having done so.

Of course not all builds are as rewarding, but one adjusts and moves on. I bought a magnesium stem for the Litespeed, that was totally wrong. Beautiful as an object, but way to chunky. It found a home with someone else... That's the beauty of Frankenbikes.

Stay tubular, Eric
Fully concur wrt aesthetic compatibility - my first build was a Hetchins with full Campagnolo, assembled from parts boxes - not a Shimano part in sight. But there was no issue about whether the brake levers would work with the calipers, no concerns whether the shifters would work with the Nuovo Record RD would work with the Regina freewheel. That was back in the 70s - Iím pretty sure the Hetchins with my build is still there somewhere in the UK
Litespud is offline  
Old 06-28-19, 11:44 PM
  #13  
southpier
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 366
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 119 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Home - Rat Rod Bikes
southpier is offline  
Old 06-29-19, 05:06 AM
  #14  
BookFinder 
Lifelong wheel gazer ...
Thread Starter
 
BookFinder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Lower US 48
Posts: 287

Bikes: 4 good ones, 1 junker

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
Liked 17 Times in 12 Posts
Hmm. I've begun the reading to fill in the gaps in my Swiss cheese body of knowledge - which at this point is more gaps than solid stuff...

@cpach, the motive in cannibalizing the TCR is to use what I have instead of laying out cash on something else.

@Litespud, thinking back on Thursday stop at an LBS, and after reading your comment, I realize I could have done better with the title! While at that shop I looked at a honest to goodness, no denying it "frankenbike" that the shop owner had assembled from the parts boxes in his store. The frame is a women's Trek; the seat came off of a Haro, and the mismatched wheels are of questionable lineage (but the new tires match). The cassette is a shiny silver and the triple up front is black. Dang, that thing personifies ugliness and beauty all in one glance. Point taken on the hyperbole.

The idea is evolving for me, but my interest is increasing daily. Speaking metaphorically, I know where I want to end up with the Cannondale, but getting there is the active question of the trip.

Thanks again to all.
__________________
Current bikes: '80's era Cannondale police bike; '03 Schwinn mongrel MTB; '03 Specialized Hard Rock (the wife's)
Past bikes: '97 Giant ATX 840 project bike; '01 Giant TCR1 SL; and a truckload of miscellaneous bikes used up by the kids and grand-kids

Status quo is the mental bastion of the intellectually lethargic...
BookFinder is offline  
Old 06-30-19, 02:14 AM
  #15  
cpach
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Mt Shasta, CA, USA
Posts: 1,267

Bikes: Too many. Cannondale SuperSix, Trek Remedy 8, Trek Crossrip+ get the most ride time.

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 255 Post(s)
Liked 29 Times in 26 Posts
You could just sell the tcr and buy parts that make sense for the cannondale. Less of a hobby project, but easier for compatibility and almost certain to result in a better functioning bike.
cpach is offline  
Likes For cpach:
Old 06-30-19, 01:38 PM
  #16  
Teamprovicycle
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Providence
Posts: 733

Bikes: Specialized tarmac sl2 giant tcx zero

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 319 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
a bottom bracket tool will be needed
Teamprovicycle is offline  
Old 07-25-19, 05:58 PM
  #17  
BookFinder 
Lifelong wheel gazer ...
Thread Starter
 
BookFinder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Lower US 48
Posts: 287

Bikes: 4 good ones, 1 junker

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
Liked 17 Times in 12 Posts
Frankenbike idea is kaput. At least from the standpoint of pulling the parts off the Giant and moving them to the Cannondale frame.

The changeover would have taken more "creativity" that I wanted to deal with, and some of the mechanicking was above my pay-grade. Meanwhile, I ran up on a young man who really wanted a nice road bike. The TCR went to him, and the Cannondale has a tune up, new rubber, and several other helpful tweaks.

If the urge to tear something apart and/or build something stays with me, I'll snag a rescue case on the cheap at a garage sale and take that route.

Thanks to those who posted helpful insights and questions.
__________________
Current bikes: '80's era Cannondale police bike; '03 Schwinn mongrel MTB; '03 Specialized Hard Rock (the wife's)
Past bikes: '97 Giant ATX 840 project bike; '01 Giant TCR1 SL; and a truckload of miscellaneous bikes used up by the kids and grand-kids

Status quo is the mental bastion of the intellectually lethargic...
BookFinder is offline  
Old 07-25-19, 06:45 PM
  #18  
delbiker1 
Senior Member
 
delbiker1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Sussex County, Delaware
Posts: 1,001

Bikes: 2003 Lemond Poprad, 1991 Ochsner steel frame, 2002 Airborne Zeppelin titanium, Schwinn DBX SS aluminum, Orbea MD 40 carbon fiber

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 263 Post(s)
Liked 97 Times in 67 Posts
RJ the bike guy has some really good videos. Also Park Tools.com has a ton of info and videos. I used both of them rebuilding a bike for the first time this past winter. BikeForums members were extremely helpful and generous with knowledge on how to and tools needed. Pictures, always pictures, are a huge help to those trying to help you!
delbiker1 is offline  
Old 07-25-19, 07:50 PM
  #19  
ramzilla
Senior Member
 
ramzilla's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Fernandina Beach FL
Posts: 2,588

Bikes: Vintage Japanese Bicycles

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 429 Post(s)
Liked 26 Times in 24 Posts
Old Japanese steel is the best for frankenbike builds. Stuff built after about 1986 is the best. Look for old Fuji's or Centurions with 6 or 7 speed rear cogs and 700c wheels. Plenty of new threaded parts available. If the rear OLD is 130mm you can slap a new RD w/brifters on it.
ramzilla is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
maverickfhs
Bicycle Mechanics
16
12-09-16 01:48 PM
brushog65
Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg)
2
08-01-15 11:25 AM
mustachiomitch
Bicycle Mechanics
18
01-23-14 11:38 AM
damme
Bicycle Mechanics
31
06-11-13 12:17 PM
KendraA
Bicycle Mechanics
11
05-07-13 12:23 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.