Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

I want to build a vintage-style CX bike - suggestions please!

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

I want to build a vintage-style CX bike - suggestions please!

Old 07-23-19, 12:50 PM
  #1  
ddeand 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ddeand's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Twin Cities
Posts: 731
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 134 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 10 Posts
I want to build a vintage-style CX bike - suggestions please!

While riding my Cannondale CAADX today, I kinda decided that maybe I'd like to sell it, take the proceeds, and build up a nice, older CX-style bike - probably pre-1990 style. The Cannondale is a very nice bike, and it fits me quite well, but I'm finding that I like riding my 1980 Miyata Pro a bit more. I think I'd like to build a steel framed bike that can handle the gravel roads that I often ride. Since I'm not competing or going terribly fast, I think I can get by just fine without the disc brakes. Off the top of my head, here's what I'd like/need to replace the CAADX:

  • 58cm frame (although an actual CX frame would likely be 56cm for me) - doesn't have to be a CX frame, but it needs to be sturdy
  • Lightweight, but fairly robust (the CAADX weighs about 21 lbs - I'd shoot for 22 lbs)
  • Strong enough for a 215 lb rider
  • Capable of being adapted to 1x8 or 1x9 drivetrain
  • Capable of handling 32x700c tires
  • Definitely a mash-up of old and new parts (e.g., brifters and hubs)
So, where should I begin with a frame (that's my biggest concern)? Component suggestions? Wheel suggestions? I've gone through the CX build section of the Forum and have gotten a few ideas, but since I'm starting out tabula rasa, I thought I'd see what some of you might suggest. All suggestions are appreciated!
__________________
Some days, it's not even worth gnawing through the restraints.
ddeand is online now  
Old 07-23-19, 12:56 PM
  #2  
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 15,763

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3878 Post(s)
Liked 211 Times in 174 Posts
I'm a big fan of 70s era racing bikes. The prices tend to be good for a full Reynolds 531 frame or a full chrome moly frame. They came with long reach brakes and most can handle 32c tires. You will want to spread them to 126 mm in the rear. I'm busy building up an early 70s Fuji Finest with 700 x 32c tires. Heck there's room for 35c tires and quite possibly larger as well.

https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...ld-thread.html

I'm building this 3 x 7 friction but it would be easy to do with 2 x 7 with brifters and indexing as well.

Back in the 70s racing bikes tended to come with center pull brakes and they were designed for bad roads. Those are very versatile bikes.
bikemig is online now  
Likes For bikemig:
Old 07-23-19, 01:05 PM
  #3  
Bandera 
~>~
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: TX Hill Country
Posts: 5,936
Mentioned: 87 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1109 Post(s)
Liked 144 Times in 93 Posts
When I was racing 'Cross the Italian Alan frames, sold under several marques, were state of the art.
Very light & easy to shoulder/run with, compliant and nimble handling w/ good mud clearance they raced very well.
That being said the >40YO aluminum "screw & glue" construction has always had problems w/ lugs cracking, finding one in good nick today might take some doing but they were the Real Deal BITD.
This will be true on any old 'Cross bike, it's a high wear & tear sport w/ crashes SOP in training and racing, at least the wrecks are in "soft-ish" dirt & mud.

-Bandera
__________________
'74 Raleigh Internat'l. '77 Trek TX900 FG. '90 Vitus 979. '10 Merckx EMX3. '13 Soma Stanyan

Last edited by Bandera; 07-23-19 at 01:15 PM.
Bandera is offline  
Likes For Bandera:
Old 07-23-19, 01:07 PM
  #4  
Reynolds 531
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Reno nevada
Posts: 307

Bikes: 4 Old school BMX, 6 Klunkers, 5 29er race bikes, 4 restored Sting Rays, Now 3 vintage steel bike being built up

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 119 Post(s)
Liked 17 Times in 13 Posts
plus bar end shifters. I dont like 1x on gravel / cross bikes. It is just so nice to "dump" the front chain from 48 to 36 or whatever, instead of click-click-click-click-click-click up the freewheel when you come to surprising hill.
Reynolds 531 is offline  
Likes For Reynolds 531:
Old 07-23-19, 02:17 PM
  #5  
Hudson308 
Mr. Anachronism
 
Hudson308's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: City of Lakes
Posts: 1,611

Bikes: fillet-brazed Chicago Schwinns, and some other stuff

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 370 Post(s)
Liked 41 Times in 30 Posts
I would suggest an early 90's hybrid... lugged if you can find it. Butted chrome moly, plenty of 700C tire clearance, cantilever brakes. Trek Multitrack, Raleigh Detour, Schwinn Sierra or Criss Cross, Specialized Crossroads, or one of the Marin models. Adaptable to just about any parts group you wanna throw at it. If you're worried about any lack of respect, strip it and paint it with something wild enough that no one can figure out what it is.
__________________
"If we don't change direction soon, we'll end up where we're going." -Irwin Corey

Last edited by Hudson308; 07-23-19 at 02:22 PM.
Hudson308 is offline  
Likes For Hudson308:
Old 07-23-19, 03:15 PM
  #6  
SamSpade1941 
Senior Member
 
SamSpade1941's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 706
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 385 Post(s)
Liked 19 Times in 16 Posts
Originally Posted by Reynolds 531 View Post
plus bar end shifters. I dont like 1x on gravel / cross bikes. It is just so nice to "dump" the front chain from 48 to 36 or whatever, instead of click-click-click-click-click-click up the freewheel when you come to surprising hill.
These days the trend seems to be going 1x , but I agree with you I like having double up front .
SamSpade1941 is offline  
Likes For SamSpade1941:
Old 07-23-19, 03:40 PM
  #7  
Andy_K 
Senior Member
 
Andy_K's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Beaverton, OR
Posts: 12,165

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 307 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1791 Post(s)
Liked 63 Times in 48 Posts
Originally Posted by ddeand View Post
  • 58cm frame (although an actual CX frame would likely be 56cm for me) - doesn't have to be a CX frame, but it needs to be sturdy
  • Lightweight, but fairly robust (the CAADX weighs about 21 lbs - I'd shoot for 22 lbs)
  • Strong enough for a 215 lb rider
  • Capable of being adapted to 1x8 or 1x9 drivetrain
  • Capable of handling 32x700c tires
  • Definitely a mash-up of old and new parts (e.g., brifters and hubs)
Which of these criteria does your Miyata not meet? I'm not trying to be snide, just trying to get a sense of what you mean by the subjective traits like "robust".

I'll admit that I am a little bit skeptical about this project. I'm a big fan of vintage bikes, and vintage bikes with fat tires and modern components in particular. Even so, I've got a Kona Jake the Snake which isn't in any real danger of losing its place in my stable because for some uses it's just better. Casual riding on standard gravel roads isn't necessarily one of those uses though, so I'm not going to tell you that your idea definitely does not have merit. So I'll accept the premise and share my thoughts.

I am of the opinion that nearly any steel frame is robust enough for gravel and strong enough for a 215 pound rider, especially if you're not going fast. Some of the super light (i.e. thin) tubing might be at risk, but just barely if at all. I also think nearly any vintage frame can be made to work well with a modern drive train. Finally, most decent steel frames will build up to something in the 22-23 pound range, depending much more on your component choices than the frame itself for where it falls in that range. So for me the requirements you list boil down to a 58 cm steel frame that can take 700x32c tires.

If you can find a bike that will take 700x35 tires that would expand your gravel tire options quite a bit, but I'm not sure how many vintage road frames will do that. I'd also suggest that you consider water bottle bosses, because clamp-on solutions are ugly and on gravel can be a bad solution. I like fender too.

A lot of vintage frames will fit the bill, especially if you're OK with 700x32 as a limit. Nearly any touring bike will do, but they might not ride the way you'd like. Bikes that are actually built for fully loaded touring tend to feel sluggish in my experience. I'd suggest that what you're looking for is a sport touring bike. Here are two from my stable for inspiration, but there are a lot of other options.

1982 Specialized Sequoia



1982 Trek 614



(Note: I had to use a clamp on solution to get a second water bottle on the Trek.)
__________________
My Bikes
Andy_K is offline  
Likes For Andy_K:
Old 07-23-19, 03:42 PM
  #8  
Andy_K 
Senior Member
 
Andy_K's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Beaverton, OR
Posts: 12,165

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 307 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1791 Post(s)
Liked 63 Times in 48 Posts
Originally Posted by SamSpade1941 View Post
These days the trend seems to be going 1x , but I agree with you I like having double up front .
Double? Double!?!? Why on earth would you limit yourself to two chainrings when you could have three just as easily?
__________________
My Bikes
Andy_K is offline  
Likes For Andy_K:
Old 07-23-19, 03:47 PM
  #9  
ddeand 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ddeand's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Twin Cities
Posts: 731
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 134 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by Reynolds 531 View Post
plus bar end shifters. I dont like 1x on gravel / cross bikes. It is just so nice to "dump" the front chain from 48 to 36 or whatever, instead of click-click-click-click-click-click up the freewheel when you come to surprising hill.
Heh, heh. At my age, I generally donít do routes where there are many surprises. I just spent a few days riding my son-in-lawís 1x bike, and I liked it a lot. My gravel riding will be relatively conventional, so I should be able to get a setup that can handle that.
__________________
Some days, it's not even worth gnawing through the restraints.
ddeand is online now  
Old 07-23-19, 04:08 PM
  #10  
ddeand 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ddeand's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Twin Cities
Posts: 731
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 134 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 10 Posts
Which of these criteria does your Miyata not meet? I'm not trying to be snide, just trying to get a sense of what you mean by the subjective traits like "robust".
The Miyata Pro pretty much covers all the bases, but it sure works well as my main road bike. I’m not sure I want to put bigger tires on it, though. It has a Tange Champion frame, so it is pretty robust. I am also working on building up a 1974 Raleigh International - would that frame be a viable candidate for my project? I have the frame but not the fork, so there is some latitude for how I can complete that. If the Raleigh International frame is a possibility, that might simplify the project. Possible?
__________________
Some days, it's not even worth gnawing through the restraints.
ddeand is online now  
Old 07-23-19, 04:18 PM
  #11  
Andy_K 
Senior Member
 
Andy_K's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Beaverton, OR
Posts: 12,165

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 307 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1791 Post(s)
Liked 63 Times in 48 Posts
Originally Posted by ddeand View Post
I am also working on building up a 1974 Raleigh International - would that frame be a viable candidate for my project? I have the frame but not the fork, so there is some latitude for how I can complete that. If the Raleigh International frame is a possibility, that might simplify the project. Possible?
A 1974 Raleigh International is definitely a candidate. By 1974 they didn't have as much tire clearance as the earlier Internationals, but you could probably get 700x32s in there without fenders. I happen to have a '74 International. Here it is with 700x28 (closer to 30 on these rims) with fenders:



You would have the issue of needing clamp-ons for water bottles, but if that isn't a problem for you this could work.
__________________
My Bikes
Andy_K is offline  
Likes For Andy_K:
Old 07-23-19, 04:32 PM
  #12  
Bandera 
~>~
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: TX Hill Country
Posts: 5,936
Mentioned: 87 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1109 Post(s)
Liked 144 Times in 93 Posts
Originally Posted by ddeand View Post
I am also working on building up a 1974 Raleigh International - would that frame be a viable candidate for my project? I have the frame but not the fork, so there is some latitude for how I can complete that. If the Raleigh International frame is a possibility, that might simplify the project. Possible?
My '74 Internat'l was the 1st bike that I raced 'Cross on and was in the pits as a back-up after getting a proper 'Cross race bike.
It's been down more lousy back-roads in the last 45 years than any machine I've owned.
Just last weekend I cut through the unpaved back lot and service road of the local farmer's mkt to avoid the entrance traffic, that would be Gravel Shopping I guess.
A highly versatile design like many British club rider's machines of the era.

-Bandera
__________________
'74 Raleigh Internat'l. '77 Trek TX900 FG. '90 Vitus 979. '10 Merckx EMX3. '13 Soma Stanyan
Bandera is offline  
Likes For Bandera:
Old 07-23-19, 04:35 PM
  #13  
clubman
Youngman Grand
 
clubman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 5,712

Bikes: roadsters, club bikes, fixed and classic

Mentioned: 86 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1058 Post(s)
Liked 77 Times in 67 Posts
Originally Posted by Hudson308 View Post
I would suggest an early 90's hybrid... lugged if you can find it. Butted chrome moly, plenty of 700C tire clearance, cantilever brakes. Trek Multitrack, Raleigh Detour, Schwinn Sierra or Criss Cross, Specialized Crossroads, or one of the Marin models. Adaptable to just about any parts group you wanna throw at it. If you're worried about any lack of respect, strip it and paint it with something wild enough that no one can figure out what it is.
I just picked up a cheap Crossroads and I'm pretty delighted with it's stance and manners. I don't think it will ever meet the OP's 22 lb criteria though. I'll let you know.
clubman is offline  
Likes For clubman:
Old 07-23-19, 04:37 PM
  #14  
ddeand 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
ddeand's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Twin Cities
Posts: 731
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 134 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 10 Posts
Beautiful Intíl, Andy K! I was going to build the Raleigh as a road bike, but maybe Iíll get some 32s and slap them on a set of 7-speed wheels I have to see if they will fit. If I can use the Raleigh, that will allow me to spend a bit more on components. If the wheels and tires fit OK, Iíll build it as a 2x7 with bar end shifters. So I guess it might all boil down to tire clearance, the appropriate brakes, freewheel size, and chainring size. Maybe for the water bottle holders Iíll just use one of those beer can helmets with tubes running to my mouth. Hmmmm . . .

Originally Posted by Andy_K View Post
A 1974 Raleigh International is definitely a candidate. By 1974 they didn't have as much tire clearance as the earlier Internationals, but you could probably get 700x32s in there without fenders. I happen to have a '74 International. Here it is with 700x28 (closer to 30 on these rims) with fenders:



You would have the issue of needing clamp-ons for water bottles, but if that isn't a problem for you this could work.
__________________
Some days, it's not even worth gnawing through the restraints.
ddeand is online now  
Old 07-23-19, 04:50 PM
  #15  
coolkat
Cyclist
 
coolkat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Seattle
Posts: 577

Bikes: '84 Univega Specialissima, Surly Cross Check, '88 Kuwahara Cascade, '18 Specialized Fuse Comp, '86 Ritchey Ascent

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
I got rid of my CAADX (well, crashed it) and replaced it with a Surly Cross Check. Surprisingly nice smooth ride, insane tire clearance, used ones are dirt cheap, and the geo is way better than a 90s hybrid. Just wasn't worth it to me to track down a vintage cyclocross bike that would only fit 33s and would probably cost more or the same as the $200 i paid for frameset + wheels.
coolkat is offline  
Likes For coolkat:
Old 07-23-19, 05:09 PM
  #16  
TiHabanero
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 2,567
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 818 Post(s)
Liked 94 Times in 63 Posts
Miyata 610, 615, 1000. They will do the job quite nicely. I have an 85 1000 running 38mm tires and fenders and run it on gravel and two track all the time.
TiHabanero is offline  
Likes For TiHabanero:
Old 07-24-19, 12:13 AM
  #17  
SurferRosa
Senior Member
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 1,166

Bikes: old school 531c & campy

Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 503 Post(s)
Liked 142 Times in 86 Posts
Saw one of these on craigs not long ago for $400ish. The paint wasn't as nice, but it looked pretty rad.

SurferRosa is offline  
Likes For SurferRosa:
Old 07-24-19, 12:33 AM
  #18  
guidogad
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 137
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by ddeand View Post
Heh, heh. At my age, I generally donít do routes where there are many surprises. I just spent a few days riding my son-in-lawís 1x bike, and I liked it a lot. My gravel riding will be relatively conventional, so I should be able to get a setup that can handle that.
If your riding is relatively 'tame' any old bike will do if you can get cx tyres in. That, however, might be harder to find than you think. From the early/mid 70s tyre clearances got smaller.
I've got about 25 road bikes between 1978 and 1989 and only one of them can be fitted with cx tyres. It's a 1983 Kuwahara built bike that is pretty much in road set-up (downtube 2x6 indexed) with cx tyres and does a splendid job.
Touring bikes are often a bit heavier and older bikes may limit your gear choices a little more w/o some intervention. I would also be a little reluctant to turn a beauty into a gravel grinder.
guidogad is offline  
Likes For guidogad:
Old 07-24-19, 02:00 AM
  #19  
tricky 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Upper Left, USA
Posts: 973
Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 216 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
Univega had a range of "via" hybrid bikes that would work for this. Despite having low rider mounts on the fork, I find them to be more lively than a touring bike. The version I rode was the Via Charisma. There are a few tiers above that model.
tricky is offline  
Old 07-24-19, 03:48 AM
  #20  
panzerwagon 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Texas Hill Country
Posts: 103

Bikes: Univega Specialissima, Univega Gran Touring

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 2 Posts
1992 Trek 790 Multitrack. Lugged, chromoly, 135mm rear dropout, 700c wheels, canti brakes, tyres as wide as you want... Iím sure other hybrids of that era will also suffice.

panzerwagon is online now  
Likes For panzerwagon:
Old 07-24-19, 05:30 AM
  #21  
nlerner
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 12,230
Mentioned: 259 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1160 Post(s)
Liked 58 Times in 48 Posts
Two words: 650b conversion.
nlerner is offline  
Old 07-24-19, 05:59 AM
  #22  
jcb3
Senior Member
 
jcb3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Irvine, CA
Posts: 591

Bikes: 1983 Trek 700, 1972 Peugeot PX10, 1989 Nishiki Cascade, 2014 Focus Izalco

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 132 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by nlerner View Post
Two words: 650b conversion.

+1 - and you can go in either direction, a 700c>>650 or 26erMTB>>650

Iíll put in a pitch for an early 70s Peugeot Px 10 as the base frame - plenty of room for 32s and fenders, really nice ride on the rough stuff. Cyclocross tubulars are a nice finishing touch and you can ride them with low pressure with no worries. Tubular wheelsets are dirt cheap these days.

I also converted a 26er late 1990s Nishiki to 650. Could fit 38mm tires and that was a great gravel ride. Just needed a new set of tektro cantilevers to make them work.

Ultimately I decided the Nishiki was too heavy and went to plastic, feasting off the 70-90% off last days of performance bike.
jcb3 is offline  
Likes For jcb3:
Old 07-24-19, 06:24 AM
  #23  
TenGrainBread 
Senior Member
 
TenGrainBread's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 2,075
Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 808 Post(s)
Liked 140 Times in 106 Posts
Sorry, but what's the point of a 26"->650b conversion? High quality slicks and knobbies are available for both so what's the point of spending a bunch of money on new wheels/brakes on this, just to get less tire clearance?
TenGrainBread is offline  
Old 07-24-19, 06:41 AM
  #24  
kunsunoke 
spondylitis.org
 
kunsunoke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Fleetwood, PA, USA
Posts: 846

Bikes: '90 Bridgestone MB-1; '85 Trek 600; '01 Cinelli Supercorsa; '89 Bridgestone RADAC 3100; '87 Tommasini Super Prestige; '13 Lynskey R2300; '84 Serotta Nova Special

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 65 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
The major issue will be tire clearance and brake reach. If you stick with steel there should be no issues with durability unless you bunny-hop or jump on a regular basis.

Framesets that will definitely work (based on personal experience):
- late 60s or early 70s Peugeot PX-10
- late 70s Trek Wisconsin 710/720
- 1960s Ideor Asso
- 1960s Carlton or Raleigh-Carlton

Michelin Mud2 tires should work well if you're expecting to use clincher rims.
kunsunoke is offline  
Likes For kunsunoke:
Old 07-24-19, 07:17 AM
  #25  
nlerner
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 12,230
Mentioned: 259 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1160 Post(s)
Liked 58 Times in 48 Posts
Here's my gravel bike: '97 Lemond Buenos Aires with 650b x 38mm tires. I had to dimple the chainstays to get tire clearance, but that was easily done in my vise. Main frame is Reynolds 853 and overall weight is around 21 lbs. When I rode it on the 100k route of the D2R2, I used a crankset with 42/28t rings; otherwise, I run it with a compact double, Shimergo drivetrain (10-speed Campy Veloce brifters and 8-speed Shimano mechs w/ a long-cage RD and a 32t large cog on the rear).

nlerner is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.