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Late to the party in 1995?

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Late to the party in 1995?

Old 08-12-19, 10:32 PM
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Hondo Gravel
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Late to the party in 1995?

I always have ridden bicycle as a kid until I could drive The bike craze hit I got into it and got addicted. I miss those times when bikes where simpler in reference to 2019. I started riding many people I knew quit years ago but I continued to push the pedals. Now I have the years behind me but I still feel like a newbie to cycling and that is good. How do y’all feel?
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Old 08-13-19, 03:13 AM
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Jim from Boston
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Late to the party in 1995?
Originally Posted by Hondo Gravel View Post
I always have ridden bicycle as a kid until I could drive The bike craze hit I got into it and got addicted. I miss those times when bikes where simpler in reference to 2019.

I started riding many people I knew quit years ago but I continued to push the pedals. Now I have the years behind me but I still feel like a newbie to cycling and that is good. How do y’all feel?
Actually, you were really late to the Bike Boom of the 1970’s, Sonny Boy.
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
Anyone around during the Bike Boom of the 1970s? Tell me about your story!”

Back in the 60’s in the Motor City, I had an “English Racer,’ and longed to tour at about age 14, but then joined the car culture. In Ann Arbor MI in the 70’s I really realized the utility of bicycles for commuting, and began touring on a five-speed Schwinn Suburban, but soon bought a Mercier as did my girlfriend, later my wife. We toured in Michigan and Ontario.

In 1977 we moved to Boston on our bikes, as a bicycling honeymoon from Los Angeles to Washington, DC and then took the train up to Boston...
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
…I can vividly remember that beautiful day of my epiphany in May of 1970, when I borrowed my roommate's Schwinn Varsity to go do a few scattered errands around town.
Originally Posted by kenzo1979 View Post
I was in high school in the 70's- graduated in '74. I raced in a club in Northern NJ, Nutley Bike Club. I did club races and did Somerville and the state championships. There was a high school bike club of about 5 (including a teacher). We did some club rides, but mostly I rode on my own. My first "serious" bike was a Peugeot UO-8. …

Bike and cycling were not "elitist" so much as enthusiast driven, although I do remember high school kids giving me puzzled stares as I told them my Campagnolo cranks cost $120 (they thought I was insane). …I became infatuated with everything Italian- Campagnolo, Clement, Vittoria etc. I had a Raleigh "Competition" for a while…

These were the days of nail-on cleats and leather "hairnet" helmets. I remember shaving my legs for the first time and getting puzzled suspicious looks from my girlfriend in HS.

The so called "bike boom" was certainly a boom in my mind-…The gasoline shortage of the mid 70's definitely boosted bike sales around my area as more people turned to bikes as an alternative to driving- especially when they sold gas alternating on days according to odd/even plate numbers.

Another bit of a phenom was the growth of the American Youth Hostels (AYH) that held large teen bike tours through New England and all around the country with a network of hostels for extended overnight trips...

I would guess that the cycling "boom" was mostly located on the east and west coasts because the growing distribution of new bikes and components branched out from importer located near major shipping distribution points- NYC, MD, LA, SF, etc.

As others have reported, my sense and memory of the boom was it was driven by teens and college students and more as a utilitarian alternative to cars for campus and in urban locales….

I miss that all chrome, cottered crank, sew up Atala track bike- still dream about riding it.

For me personally, the 1990’s were the doldrums of bicycling, as the children were young, and I was involved with my career, until my renaissance in about 2006.

Last edited by Jim from Boston; 08-13-19 at 04:04 AM.
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Old 08-13-19, 07:27 AM
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I can't remember when I wasn't riding. Some years more than others, but never not riding at all. My mtn bike is a hardtail, '96 frame with upgraded parts. My road bike is an '06 LeMond. both still serve me well, and feel no need for a more "modern" bike. I do enjoy reading and seeing the new innovations, but not something I absolutely must have. I do miss seeing mtn.biking in the Olympics (that was fun!). Not the youngest here, so I've gone through many cycles of what became popular, even remember when mtn.biking first became popular and everyone was getting into it. Guess the newest thing is e-bikes and electronic shifting, and while interesting, not something I see investing into anytime soon. But been riding so long don't ever see myself feeling "new to the party". Just a "senior" guy enjoying seeing the new innovations coming along.

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Old 08-16-19, 07:03 AM
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1995? That's when I had a cheap mountain bike and a Kawasaki KDX200. I did almost everything off-road then except drive to work in my 1983 S10 long bed pickup truck.
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Old 08-16-19, 12:28 PM
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I am REALLY late to the party. Have ridden bikes for 50+ years, mostly as a way to get exercise, on cheap bikes. In 2004 I bought a Gary Fisher Marlin, and rode a bit until I started a string of sugeries for various ailments. A couple of years ago I bought a Specialized Sirrus, this year bought an old Diamondback road bike, and I am now jonesing for a nice gravel bike.
I think because of advances in technology, the glory days are now - 12 speed cassettes, internal hubs, ebikes, all kinds of cool stuff. I have 4 bikes and I want more.
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Old 08-16-19, 01:36 PM
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Started riding road bikes around 1981 to get in better shape for off road motorcycling. Sold my last motorcycle (a YZ490) around 1992. Still love to ride road bikes and mountain bikes. I like to buy a new bike every 4 or 5 years and have been dreaming about a new road bike lately. This could be a problem since I have retired.
If I had the money I would love to try some different mountain bikes, like a long travel 29er. I would also like to buy a road bike with a compliant ride, wide gear ratio, and relatively light weight.
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Old 08-16-19, 01:38 PM
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Originally Posted by FiftySix View Post
1995? That's when I had a cheap mountain bike and a Kawasaki KDX200. I did almost everything off-road then except drive to work in my 1983 S10 long bed pickup truck.
I bought a 1986 S-10 Blazer in 1996 and drove it for 18 years. Sold it with 300,000 miles on it.
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Old 08-16-19, 04:00 PM
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Originally Posted by big john View Post
I bought a 1986 S-10 Blazer in 1996 and drove it for 18 years. Sold it with 300,000 miles on it.
Nice.

I bought my '83 in 1989 and kept it until the fall of 1995. I replaced that '83 with a brand new 1995 GMC Sonoma (aka S10). My '95 model was probably the most unreliable vehicle I've ever owned. That '83 was as reliable as any Japanese vehicle I've ever owned. I never could figure why that would be.
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Old 08-16-19, 05:18 PM
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Originally Posted by FiftySix View Post
Nice.

I bought my '83 in 1989 and kept it until the fall of 1995. I replaced that '83 with a brand new 1995 GMC Sonoma (aka S10). My '95 model was probably the most unreliable vehicle I've ever owned. That '83 was as reliable as any Japanese vehicle I've ever owned. I never could figure why that would be.
Sorry to hear you had that much trouble. As a lifelong GM technician I'm aware of certain problem models and a 95 had it's quirks, especially since it was a transition year from OBD1 to 2, but should have been able to be made reliable.

In 1973 I bought a 1965 Chevy pick-up and I drove it for 19 years. Only sold it because my ex-wife didn't like it, well mostly.
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Old 08-16-19, 09:23 PM
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Originally Posted by big john View Post
Sorry to hear you had that much trouble. As a lifelong GM technician I'm aware of certain problem models and a 95 had it's quirks, especially since it was a transition year from OBD1 to 2, but should have been able to be made reliable.

In 1973 I bought a 1965 Chevy pick-up and I drove it for 19 years. Only sold it because my ex-wife didn't like it, well mostly.
Well, ex wives are good at taking moments of joy away. Thats the true purpose of marriage. To crush that one last thing you had....

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Old 08-17-19, 06:27 AM
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Because of coordination issues, I was late (age 12) to start cycling, but ever since it has always been the only sport I have truly deeply loved. As you can read from my signature, I favor older equipment, such as classic sports-touring road bikes and a no-suspension mountain bike, all with non-indexed shift.
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Old 08-19-19, 08:57 AM
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Originally Posted by FiftySix View Post
My '95 model was probably the most unreliable vehicle I've ever owned.
Originally Posted by MrArrow View Post
Well, ex wives are good at taking moments of joy away. Thats the true purpose of marriage. To crush that one last thing you had....
Not sure if I should feel more sorry for the 95 GMC or the crush of an ex wife ... no bikes for me in the 90's, also too busy with family and career. However I did buy a 1995 Rocky Mountain Equipe in 2003. Still ride it - despite the advances in bike technology.

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Old 08-19-19, 09:16 AM
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Originally Posted by h2oxtc View Post
Not sure if I should feel more sorry for the 95 GMC or the crush of an ex wife ... no bikes for me in the 90's, also too busy with family and career. However I did buy a 1995 Rocky Mountain Equipe in 2003. Still ride it - despite the advances in bike technology.
No reason why you couldn't ride it on dirt roads and milder trails, or even hard trails if you have mad skillz. If you did ride a modern bike on a rough descent you would see what the fuss is about, however.
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Old 08-19-19, 11:56 AM
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Rode a trike or a bike every since I could remember up to when I went away for high school. Came back home for college and started riding again my senior year because I had gotten fat. Ended up losing 90 lbs. in 9 months. In 1990 I got slapped in the face by my known congenital heart defect when I was otherwise in the best shape I had ever been in. Had that fixed that same year. In 1995 I went to the last week of the Giro and rode parts of the course most days. Four years later I would take a good amount of time (more than a year) off from the working world, during which I would rack up about 10,000 loaded touring miles along with some road and transportation miles. Went exclusively back to road cycling between 2001 and 2008. Picked up a new touring bike that year and remembered what I loved about that activity. Now I try to take one two-week tour and one one-week tour, along with several long weekend tours, every year. I actually like it more than road riding these days.

My car turned 3 last month. It's about to hit 7,900 miles.

Don't feel like a newb, and that's good.
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Old 08-19-19, 02:09 PM
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I got my first 10-speed in 1973, did my first multi-day tour in 1985, got my first recumbent in 1997, and did my first sub-5-hour century in 2002.
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Old 08-19-19, 03:38 PM
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Yup 1973 was my first bike with that crazy banana seat, one speed and the brakes you use the pedals to engage. I forgot what you call them. Then the tires that resemble a car tire. I live in the Cleveland Ohio suburb of Lakewood and that was freedom. My friends on the block did all kind of crazy things on our bikes. Jumping ramps and having contests on you could brake the longest skid. I went through many rear tires lol. Get off my yard guy getting angry for marking up the sidewalk. Anyways had a lot of fun and good clean mischief that was harmless.
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Old 08-19-19, 03:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Hondo Gravel View Post
Yup 1973 was my first bike with that crazy banana seat, one speed and the brakes you use the pedals to engage. I forgot what you call them. Then the tires that resemble a car tire. I live in the Cleveland Ohio suburb of Lakewood and that was freedom. My friends on the block did all kind of crazy things on our bikes. Jumping ramps and having contests on you could brake the longest skid. I went through many rear tires lol. Get off my yard guy getting angry for marking up the sidewalk. Anyways had a lot of fun and good clean mischief that was harmless.
They're called coaster brakes. The rear tire on those Sting Ray type bikes was supposed to look like a drag racing slick. My friends who had them did jump stuff with them. I had an English 3 speed which I jumped until the frame broke. That was probably 1967ish.

A few years ago a local bike shop ran a race called "The Coaster Brake Challenge". It was a 5 race series on dirt with some steep ups and downs and you could bring any bike as long as the only brake was the rear coaster brake. A friend did it and he said it was a blast. It was even featured in one of the magazines. Guys reliving their childhood.

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Old 08-19-19, 04:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Hondo Gravel View Post
Yup 1973 was my first bike with that crazy banana seat, one speed and the brakes you use the pedals to engage. I forgot what you call them. Then the tires that resemble a car tire. I live in the Cleveland Ohio suburb of Lakewood and that was freedom. My friends on the block did all kind of crazy things on our bikes. Jumping ramps and having contests on you could brake the longest skid. I went through many rear tires lol. Get off my yard guy getting angry for marking up the sidewalk. Anyways had a lot of fun and good clean mischief that was harmless.
Same here. I had a Sears Free Spirit banana seat bike with flat profile rear tire and my brother had same type of bike from another store. My best friend at the time had a Huffy Cheeter Slick bike of the same build.

Wheelies, jumping junky dangerous ramps, and skid contests were the thing to do. Until BMX style took over, that is.
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Old 08-19-19, 05:03 PM
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Yeah, same here. I simply HAD to get my hands on a pair of BMX style bars, WITH the crossbar. The crossbar was indispensable. After all, you could maybe bend your bars or something, without one.

Next, I had to get the number plate, and the BMX style grips. Ditched the banana seat for a road bike style seat. And finally, the knobby tires. I was there, man. Still only had one gear and a coaster brake, but I was a happy 13 year-old kid, equipment-wise.
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Old 08-20-19, 06:55 AM
  #20  
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Originally Posted by Lemond1985 View Post
Yeah, same here. I simply HAD to get my hands on a pair of BMX style bars, WITH the crossbar. The crossbar was indispensable. After all, you could maybe bend your bars or something, without one.

Next, I had to get the number plate, and the BMX style grips. Ditched the banana seat for a road bike style seat. And finally, the knobby tires. I was there, man. Still only had one gear and a coaster brake, but I was a happy 13 year-old kid, equipment-wise.
We converted our banana seat bikes to wannabe BMXers as well. It gave new life to our out of fashion bikes and made them cool again.
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