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105 or Ultegra Hubs

Old 07-08-19, 01:40 AM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by masi61 View Post
The Ultegra 6800, 8000 series use this newer system the same as Dura Ace 9000 where then bearing cone set up is done I want to say with a metric Allen wrench.
I need to look into these. If they're still using a cup and cone bearing, but you can replace bearings if need be, rebuild the hub, and adjust it properly with a regular multi-tool, that sounds like a good thing.

After looking up a video on those hubs, they do look incredibly easy to field service. It actually seems like a great, simple system. The sealing might be lacking, though. Hmm...

Last edited by 3speed; 07-08-19 at 01:48 AM.
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Old 07-08-19, 02:41 AM
  #27  
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I have Shimano 105, Deore, Ultegra. They all work well here in Cambodia, easy to service and keep adjusted. A handful of ball bearing and some grease is all I need.
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Old 07-08-19, 05:32 AM
  #28  
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I would not hesitate for one second to use either 105 or Ultegra hubs. I'd choose them over expensive boutique hubs any day. On my last bike I had what was probably Shimano's lowest end hubs, something you'd find on a sub $500 bike, and both lasted over 20yrs. All you need is some loose ball bearings, grease and a couple of simple tools.
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Old 07-10-19, 02:32 AM
  #29  
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Problem with Shimano hubs is that when the cups wear out the hubs become a throw away item. Also getting new cones when the old ones are worn can be a painful process waiting for stock, at least here in Australia. As a wheel builder I mostly won't use them unless a customer insists.
I'd be using DTSwiss 350 hubs for touring as when they wear out it's easy to put new cartridge bearing in. Another advantage is that if you break a drive side spoke, you don't need to carry cassette removal tools as you can easily remove the freehub body. Low maintenance, easy to service and if you get the DBCL version it's easy to change the end caps to either use the on want to use them either 135, 142 or 148mm spacing
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Old 07-12-19, 06:58 PM
  #30  
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Ordered a set of DT Swiss 350 hubs from the shop. Decided to stop it with being cheap and get the stuff that will last into infinity. Truth is, I like the "ratchet" system they use for the freehub body. Easily field serviceable without tools outside of a vice to hold it while working on it.
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Old 07-12-19, 07:09 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by geoffs View Post
Problem with Shimano hubs is that when the cups wear out the hubs become a throw away item. Also getting new cones when the old ones are worn can be a painful process waiting for stock, at least here in Australia. As a wheel builder I mostly won't use them unless a customer insists.
I'd be using DTSwiss 350 hubs for touring as when they wear out it's easy to put new cartridge bearing in. Another advantage is that if you break a drive side spoke, you don't need to carry cassette removal tools as you can easily remove the freehub body. Low maintenance, easy to service and if you get the DBCL version it's easy to change the end caps to either use the on want to use them either 135, 142 or 148mm spacing
while I tend to disagree on the cups and cones wearing out thing, given my experience that with regular regreasing, they will last ages in excellent condition---I must admit that Im intrigued by the pluses you bring up.
did a quick look , and not avail in disc with qr , only thru axles--so wouldnt be able to use them on my Troll in other words.

but neat design advantages. Ive just never owned cartridge bearing hubs yet, so really have no experience with them.
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Old 07-12-19, 09:17 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
while I tend to disagree on the cups and cones wearing out thing, given my experience that with regular regreasing, they will last ages in excellent condition---I must admit that Im intrigued by the pluses you bring up.
did a quick look , and not avail in disc with qr , only thru axles--so wouldnt be able to use them on my Troll in other words.

but neat design advantages. Ive just never owned cartridge bearing hubs yet, so really have no experience with them.
I checked DT Swiss' site, 350 Classic avail in disc/QR. I've never had many problems with cup/cone hubs either but maybe DT Swiss would be good for epic tours. My newer bike has proprietary HED wheels with mystery sealed-bearing hubs...only info I could get was they're supposedly user-serviceable & accept std bearings.
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Old 07-13-19, 08:02 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by DropBarFan View Post
I checked DT Swiss' site, 350 Classic avail in disc/QR. I've never had many problems with cup/cone hubs either but maybe DT Swiss would be good for epic tours. My newer bike has proprietary HED wheels with mystery sealed-bearing hubs...only info I could get was they're supposedly user-serviceable & accept std bearings.
thanks, I guess my quick search was too quick.
I really like to do all my own mechanical stuff, so if I ever went this route, I'd just need to learn how to deal with cartridge style bearings. but then no different than having to figure out disk brakes and muddle my way through it, like all new mechanical stuff.
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Old 07-13-19, 01:57 PM
  #34  
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A couple of random questions:
1) Are hub problems common? I've only done a couple thousand miles of loaded touring, so I'm still in the lower ranks of many of you, and have never done really long tours(a month-ish was the longest). I've never had a hub problem on any modern bike, though, only older freewheel bikes. Maybe I've been lucky. Should I realistically be concerned about it?

2) What is the best "bang for your buck" field serviceable disk brake hub, that will allow you to deal with a broken drive side spoke without special tools? And I'm not referring to "Well, a Phil will last forever, so it's the best value at $500/hub." There are cheaper hubs out there that will last a really long time. I'm not rich, so really expensive is not a good value for me. I was looking at the VO hubs a while back, but for some reason was hesitant. Now they only offer 11sp freehub version, so that option is gone.
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Old 07-13-19, 07:36 PM
  #35  
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I'm looking at the DT Swiss bearing replacement video: it doesn't look much easier than the more common cartridge-bearing hubs. Video uses a vice, nylon mallet, lockring tool & punch tools. Not too hard to do at home but in the field could be a challenge, to say the least. So I'm not really seeing the advantages of a ~$350 pair of hubs here...am I missing something?
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Old 07-14-19, 06:26 AM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by DropBarFan View Post
I'm looking at the DT Swiss bearing replacement video: it doesn't look much easier than the more common cartridge-bearing hubs. Video uses a vice, nylon mallet, lockring tool & punch tools. Not too hard to do at home but in the field could be a challenge, to say the least. So I'm not really seeing the advantages of a ~$350 pair of hubs here...am I missing something?
If I was going to be doing an epic journey then I'd be replacing wheel bearings and most probably the BB bearings as part of trip preperation.
For a few thousand km tour, I'd just be greasing any bearing I could access and giving them a check over. If a bearing started to go then it would last you until the end of the trip when you could easily replace it. If a bearing starts to wear then any damage is contained within the bearing unless you ride with completely seized bearings. If you did the same with cup and cone bearing then if you catch the wear in time you will just have to replace the cones. If you don't fix the cones in time, the cups will get damaged and it's new hub/wheel time.
So the same amount of neglect/wear and tear that will damage a bearing means that for a wheel built with cartridge bearings such as a DT350 you will just need the $10 bearing replaced when you get an opportunity to do it. The same amount of wear and tear on a shimano hub will end up requiring a new wheel. I know what scenario I'd prefer which is why all our wheels have either Chris King or DT 240's. My track bike does have Dura Ace track hubs which are just beautiful but not really relevant.
I have had somewhere around 60-70,000kms from Dura Ace hubs back in the days of freewheels. 105 hubs were worn out after 12,000kms. Mavic 500 hubs were my first cartridge bearing hubs and I would have done over 100,000kms on them. Lost track of how many sets of bearings I wore out
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Old 07-15-19, 11:50 AM
  #37  
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@3speed, yes, hub problems are common, especially with rear hubs, as the rear hub bears most of the load. This is why I think investing in high-quality hubs can be worthwhile, more than investing in gear changing equipment. You aren't always changing gears, but you are always rolling.

I have no preference between cup-and-cone and cartridge bearing hubs. Each type has its advantages.
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Old 07-15-19, 05:05 PM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by 3speed View Post
A couple of random questions:
1) Are hub problems common? I've only done a couple thousand miles of loaded touring, so I'm still in the lower ranks of many of you, and have never done really long tours(a month-ish was the longest). I've never had a hub problem on any modern bike, though, only older freewheel bikes. Maybe I've been lucky. Should I realistically be concerned about it?

2) What is the best "bang for your buck" field serviceable disk brake hub, that will allow you to deal with a broken drive side spoke without special tools? And I'm not referring to "Well, a Phil will last forever, so it's the best value at $500/hub." There are cheaper hubs out there that will last a really long time. I'm not rich, so really expensive is not a good value for me. I was looking at the VO hubs a while back, but for some reason was hesitant. Now they only offer 11sp freehub version, so that option is gone.
in my experience over the decades, hub problems are not common. Not with me, nor my friends. Like you, I have really never had a hub problem, but then I have always done my own regreasing servicing, so I am generally intimately aware of the condition of my bike hubs.
I have had one small issue once, where I noticed that my front hub's cones were a bit loose, and I noticed it right away, and just went to a small bike store in the Mexican town I was in, and the owner reset the cones at the right tension---this was a first for me, so it was an obvious user error when I overhauled the hubs before the trip in the winter in my garage. I must have made an error in tightening the locknut, so mea culpa.

this example is a good one to show why the age old adage of it being better to get a reasonable amount of riding in after any larger maintenance, to show up any little niggles.
After the proper cone adjustment, the hub was fine for the rest of the trip, as well as the next trip also, so in line with my hubs on my bikes that stay like they are after I do an overhaul, this was a mistake on my part.

this touches on the whole topic of the advantages of learning to do all the mechanical work yourself with your bike. You really do know the state of all the bits and bobs, and over time, you know how things will be over time, and have a better estimate of how things need adjusting when etc.

Because I have done hubs for years, I noticed the small play in the cone with the wheel on the bike. Think I noticed it putting on or taking off the front pannier. First mistakenly thought it was the qr that was loose, but then saw by moving the wheel with my hand and looking at hub, that the cone was a bit loose.

touch wood, but Ive never really had other mechanical issues much more than one spoken spoke back in 92 I think, in France. Went to a bike store, they replaced spoke, end of story.
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Old 07-16-19, 12:50 PM
  #39  
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I also always do my own work, and go over my bike very thoroughly before a tour, and then put on at least a few long ride days before the trip. Then recheck all bolts and bearings to make sure they're still where they should be.
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Old 07-17-19, 09:07 AM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by 3speed View Post
A couple of random questions:
1) Are hub problems common? I've only done a couple thousand miles of loaded touring, so I'm still in the lower ranks of many of you, and have never done really long tours(a month-ish was the longest). I've never had a hub problem on any modern bike, though, only older freewheel bikes. Maybe I've been lucky. Should I realistically be concerned about it?
In my forty years of riding and touring I would say hub problems are rare, if you bother to maintain your hubs. I ride on heavily salted winter roads which will destroy any hub ( I've replaced "sealed" bearings on a White Industries hub after a couple of winters). I take apart my hubs twice a year, before and after winter, clean and re-grease with season appropriate waterproof grease. So far so good.

Originally Posted by 3speed View Post
2) What is the best "bang for your buck" field serviceable disk brake hub, that will allow you to deal with a broken drive side spoke without special tools? And I'm not referring to "Well, a Phil will last forever, so it's the best value at $500/hub." There are cheaper hubs out there that will last a really long time. I'm not rich, so really expensive is not a good value for me. I was looking at the VO hubs a while back, but for some reason was hesitant. Now they only offer 11sp freehub version, so that option is gone.
Below is a Chris King hub (not my photo).
I use Shimano hubs, not even the expensive ones, whatever you find on sub $500 bikes.

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