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Anyone using a 46/30T crank on a road bike?

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Anyone using a 46/30T crank on a road bike?

Old 06-11-19, 05:31 AM
  #376  
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Originally Posted by wgscott View Post
We can now add Shimano to the list: FC-RX600-11

https://gravel.shimano.com/en/components/crankset/

The higher-tier one in their new gravel line is 48/31T. (WTF?)

They say that these new cranks change the chainline by 2.5mm, and that requires their new derailleur(s). (also, WTF?)
The chainline on the RX-600-11 is optimized for modern disc brake bikes with 142mm thru-axles. It's possible that this crankset will have chainline related cross-chaining issues if installed on a rim brake bike. The big-big combination would be problematic.

Last edited by Barrettscv; 06-11-19 at 11:36 AM.
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Old 06-23-19, 08:15 AM
  #377  
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Originally Posted by Barrettscv View Post


The chainline on the RX-600-11 is optimized for modern disc brake bikes with 142mm thru-axles. It's possible that this crankset will have chainline related cross-chaining issues if installed on a rim brake bike. The big-big combination would be problematic.
I have a White Industries crank with a wider chain-line along with a 135mm hub in the rear. Works fine, even on big-big (and my rear big is 36T on one wheelset, 34 on the other). My bet is it most likely will work.

Anyway, the point was that it is another option (and that this is now main-stream enough to be an option with Shimano, FSA, etc.), not that it will work with any setup.
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Old 06-23-19, 08:46 AM
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Originally Posted by wgscott View Post
I have a White Industries crank with a wider chain-line along with a 135mm hub in the rear. Works fine, even on big-big (and my rear big is 36T on one wheelset, 34 on the other). My bet is it most likely will work.

Anyway, the point was that it is another option (and that this is now main-stream enough to be an option with Shimano, FSA, etc.), not that it will work with any setup.
The Shimano RX-600-11 Gravel crankset is an excellent solution for disc brake bikes with thru-axles. Rim brake bikes with 130mm dropouts, the most common specification, might have drivetrain issues. Shimano recommendations the matching derailleur. These are important details that purchasers need to consider.
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Old 06-26-19, 10:27 AM
  #379  
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Yep. Just put a Ritchey Logic compact (94mm bcd) on my Merckx Team SC. Works just right with a Campy 102mm BB, and weighs less than most modern cranks!

But it did take a while to get over the "that's not appropriate for a pro race bike" thing and give my self the gearing I need.
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Old 07-05-19, 05:09 AM
  #380  
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Maybe a simpler solution is to just substitute the big ring 50 tooth chainring for a 46 T. I did that on my Cannondale that originally came with A 50/34. I needed to lower the front derailleur a tad, but with the 46 big ring I find I spend 95% of the time in the big ring in hilly Virginia.
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Old 07-05-19, 05:35 AM
  #381  
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You can run a compact on a vintage bike as well with the right crank such as a TA cyclotourist or a Stronglight 99. I recently built up an early 70s Motobecane Grand Record with a TA crank. The original gearing was 52/40 with a 14-26 5 speed rear freewheel. That provided a low of 41.5 gear inches. I built the bike up with 46/36 rings and a 14-28 5 speed rear freewheel which gave me a knee friendlier 34.7 gear inch low. I should search around for a 32 inner and run this as a 46/32.


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Old 07-18-19, 09:33 AM
  #382  
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Hello everyone- I just found this Forum because of a Google search I did"anyone using 46/30T on road bike?" I have a Cannondale Synapse Carbon 4 that uses an FSA Energy compact 50/34T 110 BCD 5 bolts(ABS I guess) It has the BB30 and SRAM Rival group-set. My dream was the adventure crankset by FSA 46/30 but bike shops said it couldn't be done and/or if possible the crank was $350 Canadian.

So instead today I am spending too much money to get a new rear SRAM Rival cassette 11-36 to give me 4 more teeth-then need a new derailler to fit the 4 extra teeth and a new front chainring since the original is a bit worn. This is a change from my 11-32 that came with the bike.


I can go up hills the way it is-we have mountains and such -mostly I stay away from the silliness like riding to Whistler(ski area). The problem is my heartrate goes up to around 175-185 on hills. My max. heartrate should be 165.


I wondered if I could just switch out two rings and put on a 48/32T combination to my existing crankset. If they are 110 BCD it should work? LBS said maybe the smaller ring will cause an issue by rubbing the front derailler and or chainstays.

Sorry for the essay. Anyone have any ideas.

Thanks
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Old 07-18-19, 09:44 AM
  #383  
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@chef09

The SRAM 11-36T might work fine with your existing derailleur, with just a B-screw adjustment. Then Wolf-tooth makes an adaptor, if that (or putting in a longer screw for $0.75) isn't enough. My Shimano mid-cage Ultegra derailleur handles the SRAM 11-36T cassette without issue.

I think the least expensive option for the front (US$ 150) will now be the new Shimano GRX 46/30T crankset.

Last edited by wgscott; 07-18-19 at 01:47 PM. Reason: added MSRP
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Old 07-18-19, 09:50 AM
  #384  
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Originally Posted by Timdugan View Post
Maybe a simpler solution is to just substitute the big ring 50 tooth chainring for a 46 T.
If your goal is just to change the gear spacing, rather than the lower range, that would work, but if you want a smaller small chain-ring to get lower hill-climbing gearing, I don't see the advantage.
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Old 07-18-19, 09:51 AM
  #385  
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I was running Absolute Black 46/30 chainrings on an Ultegra crank but they have gone away due to shifting performance issues. It is a shame because the oval rings feel great to pedal.

An Easton EC90 SL "Cinch" crank with Easton 46/30 gravel rings in going on. I'm currently waiting for the proper spacers to arrive.







-Tim-
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Old 07-18-19, 10:04 AM
  #386  
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I have 44/24 on the sugino ox601d. 46/24 was possible if I used spa cycle rings, but then requires very precise adjustments. Ox601d and ox901d are discontinued and leftover stock is on sale on the sugino website. The splines slip though so you need to use the light loctite 222 in the compression bolt or else it will come loose. Blue loctite is too strong and you'll have to heat it with a torch to melt the threadlocker. The newer ox2-901d has revised splines similar to Shimano splines. The new compression bolt uses Shimano socket head. But with the old compression bolt, I tapped it with left hand threads so thieves can't get it off. I don't think you can tap the new compression bolt.
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Old 07-18-19, 02:49 PM
  #387  
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Thanks so much. The unfortunate thing is -the bike shop already ordered and received the new rear derailleur. Because they don't stock it, I doubt that they will be willing to 'send it back'. I will try. I will also look for the Shimano 46/30 crankset. It's the small ring that I want and the 46 is to accommodate the 'keeping the same jump' between front rings. I'm just leaving for the shop now. Hopefully they will try to make the original derailleur work to save me some dough but SRAM says that this stock piece maxes out at 34T for the rear cassette. Based on that recommendation I think the LBS will err on the side of caution. (and selling a part that they special ordered .
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Old 07-18-19, 03:55 PM
  #388  
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I have a Shimano RD4700 rear derailleur with 12-34T custom 10 speed cassette that I mixed and matched myself. With a 44/24T front double crank. This gives me a 519% range = 44/24*34/12. The lowest gear gives me 24/34 = 0.706 ratio. The RD4700 is rated for up to 34T cassette and a 41T chain wrap, but I'm using 42T wrap and have tried up to 44T wrap, if the small-small combination has the pulleys dragging on the chain, but it doesn't matter since I am never on the small-small.

Your 11-32T with 50/34T is = 50/34*32/11 = 428% range. Your lowest gear gives you a 34/32 = 1.0625 ratio.

If you increase the rear cog to 36T, then you get at the lowest 34/36 = 0.944 ratio, or a 1.0625/0.944 = 12.5% drop, which feels like 1 gear lower. Also the range changes to 481%.

However, if you're really having trouble on the lowest gear, you might want at least a 30% drop, or a 0.81 gear ratio, which feels more like a 2 gear drop.

You currently have a 16T jump on your front chainring. I've done 20T jump without any problems, as long as you install a chain catcher and fiddle with the FD angles and cable. I was also able to do 22T jump but was more complicated to adjust. So if you want to keep a 50T then you could match it with 30T for a 20 jump. However, 110mm BCD will only allow you to go as low as 33T, which you can get from TA or spacycles. If you want to go lower than 33T, the FSA with 30T has 80mm BCD but I had asked before and they don't make any other sized chainrings for 80mm. The minimum teeth physically possible for 80mm BCD is 26T, so if you have a CNC machine, you could take a 26T with 74mm BCD and drill out new holes at 80mm. Otherwise, get a crank with 110/74mm and your minimum possible teeth drops to 24T.

If you drop your small chainring to 30T and keep your max 32T rear cog, you get a 0.9375 ratio. It's practically the same as changing to a 36T max rear cog. But the benefit of changing the front chainring instead is having closer cassette spacing. My custom mixed cassette has big spacing at the bottom and small spacing at the top. 34, 28, 24, 21, 19, 17, 15, 14, 13 ,12. Some of the Shimano cassettes don't mix well though. I have another thread explaining my experience attempting to mix 4 different sets of Shimano 10 speed cogs.

With an 18T jump in chainrings, if I increase the chainring spacings by inserting 0.1-0.2mm shim washers, I can go up to 8th gear on 10 speed while on the inner chainring before the chain starts to rub on the outer chainring. With a 20T jump, I can only go up to 7th gear. But 7th gear on the inner chainring for me is somewhere between 2nd and 3rd on the outer chainring. So there is only 2 usable gears overlapping. So I have 15 unique gears in a linear shift.

With the small-small combination with 24T chainring, the chain will start rubbing on the chainstay, but since I'm never on small-small because I can only get up to 7th gear on the small chainring, it isn't a problem for me. For quick estimate of chain clearance, you can take 1.0" x 25.4mm / 3.1415 = 8.09mm difference in chainring diameter for every 2 teeth, since 2 teeth is a change of 1.0" in circumference or chain length.

Last edited by tomtomtom123; 07-18-19 at 04:28 PM.
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Old 07-20-19, 06:38 PM
  #389  
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I'm running the Absolute Black 46-30 oval ring setup with an Ultegra 6800 FD on a road bike. It's working and shifting just fine for me. Highly recommend.

Front derailler adjustment is critically important. I had to lower the FD a bit, move my chain catcher, reset the High and Low limit screws, shorten the chain and adjust cable tension carefully.

The oval rings are a real game changer making it easier to get the pedal over-the-top....great feel. Not only do I get super low gearing if needed for tough climbs (cassette is 11-32 w/GS rear derailler) but top end is only a bit lower. Top gear is now the equivalent of 50-12 that I had before so I can spin top gear to 30 mph on moderate downhills if I want.....after that just coast.

Last edited by qajaq; 07-20-19 at 06:41 PM. Reason: Correcting the "auto-correct" spelling mistakes
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Old 07-24-19, 05:21 PM
  #390  
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I just ordered the Shimano 46/30T crankset from Shimano. It is only $150 (plus a discount at UC). When it arrives, I will put it on my bike and compare it to the White Industries one.
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Old 07-24-19, 07:30 PM
  #391  
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Okay, I have an update. I expected my bike to be done today with the new rear derailler , a new cassette(11-36T), new front chain ring (replacing the original 34T with a new 34T). So the bike is not done because the Sram derailler that they brought in is only compatible with a 1X front ring set-up. . They were in the process of putting on a Wolf RoadLink to see if they could make it work.When I called an hour later the bike mechanic had gone home for the day. I was told that the bike was ready for pick-up but it had a note attached: "This setup will not allow the bike to be shifted to the first 3 gears when on the big chain ring up front". Is that normal/acceptable? Typically I understand that you don't need to be on the first 3 big gears in back on the big ring-go down to smaller front ring, but . . .should I even try it. I'm afraid that if it is shifting lousy, I willbe stuck with something that I can't send back. Should I get the old cassette back on a just give up. Advice please.

Thank you

Last edited by chef09; 07-25-19 at 10:26 AM.
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Old 07-25-19, 11:54 AM
  #392  
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The new 34T chainring should only be about $10 or $20, so at least that didn't waste much money.

If they are trying to be helpful and make it work, try the following:

Shimano 46/30T GRX crankset, $150. (I just purchased one myself from Universal Cycles and it will arrive tomorrow).

Keep the SRAM 11-36T cassette.

Try it with the original Shimano derailleur and B-screw adjustment. (I personally have never had a good experience with SRAM derailleurs.) If your bike is like mine, it will simply work. If not, then the Wolftooth extension can help.

With my (current) 46/30T crankset, and an 11-36T cassette, my ultegra derailleurs work fine. I can access all the gearing, including cross-chaining, with zero drama.
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Old 07-26-19, 07:36 PM
  #393  
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Originally Posted by wgscott View Post
Shimano 46/30T GRX crankset, $150. (I just purchased one myself from Universal Cycles and it will arrive tomorrow).
Really interested to see how this works and if you can use your current derailleur. Please post update ASAP
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Old 07-27-19, 11:39 PM
  #394  
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Originally Posted by wgscott View Post
The new 34T chainring should only be about $10 or $20, so at least that didn't waste much money.

If they are trying to be helpful and make it work, try the following:

Shimano 46/30T GRX crankset, $150. (I just purchased one myself from Universal Cycles and it will arrive tomorrow).

Keep the SRAM 11-36T cassette.

Try it with the original Shimano derailleur and B-screw adjustment. (I personally have never had a good experience with SRAM derailleurs.) If your bike is like mine, it will simply work. If not, then the Wolftooth extension can help.

With my (current) 46/30T crankset, and an 11-36T cassette, my ultegra derailleurs work fine. I can access all the gearing, including cross-chaining, with zero drama.
Well, everything here in Canada costs way more- plus I ordered it through the bike shop with their mark-up. So, the chainring was $39.00 plus the SRAM PG1070 cassette, the new chain, a wolf road link and labour.. With tax . . . I got 4 extra teeth etc. for $250.00 and cross chain drama. I went to another bike shop, explained what had be done to the bike and they suggested that the chain might be too short because of the extra teeth and the wolf-link so . . . I will take it to them and see if that's the issue. They also said that a low end SRAM Apex MTB derailer ($39.00) could probably fix the crosschain issues.
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Old 07-28-19, 07:13 AM
  #395  
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Did they explain why you can't use the first 3 inner cogs with the big chaining? It could be something else, but I guess that it has to with the chain wrap exceeding the chain capacity of the rear derailleur. If the chain is too short so that you can't use the big-big combination, then you have the risk of tearing out the RD if you accidentally shift to the big-big. Instead, you should make the chain a few links longer just until you're able to use the big-big. Then instead of not being able to use the first 3 inner cogs on the outer chaining, you will not be able to use the last 3 or 4 outer cogs when on the inner chaining since the pulley will drag on the chain, but then there will not be a risk of damage, and the small-small is not needed since the small-small gear range is overlapped by the big-big.

You can easily do this yourself instead of paying a bike shop to do it for you. Simply wrap a new full length chain around the big-big combination and through the RD pulleys, and stick in a hook through the chain to hold it at a shortened length that allows the RD cage to bend adequately. Make sure that the hook is the same length as the connector link. If it is longer, then you have to estimate how much more the pulley will pull on the big-big. You need to hook the chain at a link that will have exposed inner plates when you cut it. Then shift the chain to the small-small combination with the same chain length. The pulley will most likely drag. Then move the chain to the 2nd smallest cog or the 3rd smallest or 4th smallest cog until the pulley no longer drags. That is the smallest cog you can use. Then cut the chain at that length, and insert the chain link.

The Wolf roadlink will not increase your chain wrap capacity. The chain wrap capacity is determined by the RD cage length and how much forward/rearward movement the shift mechanism moves when changing between the highest and lowest cog. For Shimano, there is the SS (short) and GS (mid) and SGS (long) cages. The standard road RD usually only goes up to 32 or 34T cog, so the Wolf roadlink would help to allow you to get up to 36T cog by increasing the gap to the pulley, but the gap will be quite large when on the small outer cog. You can search the Shimano specifications PDF to compare which RD gives the largest wrap.

If you continue to use your 11-36T and 34/50T, then your wrap is 36-11+50-34 = 41T
If you want to also change to 30/50T, then you need another +4 links + 41 = 45T

https://productinfo.shimano.com/#/sp...r%20Derailleur
I use the 4700-GS because it is has the greatest chain wrap capacity of 41T for a medium length road cage for 34T cog. I have 20" wheels so longer cages will touch the ground. I can only use medium length cages. I have 12-34T and 24/44T, for a wrap of 42T.

https://productinfo.shimano.com/#/sp...r%20Derailleur
Many of the SGS mountain RD have max wrap of 43T and max cog of 36T

https://productinfo.shimano.com/#/sp...r%20Derailleur
The gravel RD-RX400 has a max wrap of 42T and max cog of 36T

https://productinfo.shimano.com/#/sp...r%20Derailleur
The trekking RD has a max wrap of 47T and max cog of 36T. It looks super long.

For SRAM, they don't publish a convenient numerical specifications chart to show you the numerical wrap capacity of their RD lineup. It's a headache to go search for the specs, and different retailers publish different and incorrect numbers. SRAM has short, medium, and long cages for their road lineup. For some reason SRAM publishes shorter chain wrap capacity than Shimano, but there are variances in cage lengths. Usually you can still get 2-3T more than the maximum that they publish if you lengthen the chain just until the small-small combo drags the pulley on the chain. When SRAM says compatible with only 1x, it doesn't mean that you can't use 2x. There is usually no difference in the physical alignment of the chain between a 1x or 2x RD. The most likely difference is that the chain wrap capacity is too short to allow for the standard 16+ T jump for a front double chainring. You could probably use a "1x" RD on a 2x setup, just that some of your wrap capacity will be taken up by the jump in the 2x, leaving you with less capacity for the cassette.


Your 4T increase from 32T to 36T is giving you a 12.5% lower smallest gear combination. It's not much. If you want even smaller, you might also want to change the crank so that you can use smaller chainrings. Your 110 BCD is limited to a minimum of 33T. Other people have mentioned 46/30 cranks like the Shimano GRX FC-RX600. A drop from 34T to 30T inner chainring is an additional 13% reduction. You can do a 20T jump if you set it up correctly, so you can use 30/50. If you can't get it right, you can also use 30/48. I am able to use 20 and 22T jumps with 24/44 and 24/46. I can't use the 3 outer cogs when on the inner chanring because the chain will rub on the outer chainring, but it doesn't matter because thse 3 gears overlap with the big-big combination anyway so I don't need to use them. Most of these cranks with smaller chainrings use 24mm spindles. You mentioned that yours is BB30. There are several adapters available to change to 24mm spindles.

These ones are adapters that you simply press in so that you don't need to change the BB, but they don't mention the thickness. Different crank manufacturers require different overall widths, but you can usually go +/-1mm. You can even offset one side to adjust the chain line. You can search the internet for the width that you need for the crank that you choose, and you can contact the manufacturers of the adapters for the thickness of the adapters. If the width is too narrow, you can use 24mm spindle shims, which wheelsmfg offers, to increase the width.
https://wheelsmfg.com/bb30-adapter-f...mm-cranks.html
https://www.bike24.com/p250227.html
https://wheelsmfg.com/products/botto...r-10-pack.html
https://wheelsmfg.com/products/botto...r-10-pack.html

These ones are complete BB sets with built in reducers, but you'll have to remove your old BB. You'll also have to find out their overall widths.
https://www.sigmasports.com/item/Pra...Converter/1VMZ
https://www.chainreactioncycles.com/.../rp-prod130495
https://wheelsmfg.com/bottom-bracket...-outboard.html

If you want to remove the BB30 bearings, you can try this BB30 puller. This guy also sells pressers, you just need to find one with a diameter that will press on the outside housing or outer bearing track ring and not directly on the inner bearing track ring.
https://www.bearingprotools.com/coll...bearing-puller

Shimano GRX FC-RX600 uses 4 bolt 80mm BCD, which is physically limited to a minimum of 28T, but I don't know if 28T is actually available from Shimano. Instead, you can use the Sugino OX cranks, which use more common 5 bolt 74/110 BCD which can go as low as 24T.

Also, if you don't mind spending $700-800, you could try the Schlumpf Drive Mountain cranks, which has a 1:2.5 reduction. So if you have a 50T on 1:1 neutral, then when you switch to the reduction gear, you'll get 50 / 2.5 = 20T equivalent. It's normally for 68mm BSA, but you can ask them for adapters for BB30. With a 2.5 reduction, you can go with a 12-28T, 12-27T, 11-25T and still get a larger gear range than with any of your previous setups, while getting the benefit of closer stepping. The only problem is that their crank arms have a somewhat large Q-factor for the standard 170mm length. The other non-standard lengths that they offer are even wider.
http://www.schlumpfdrive.com/index.p...ain-drive.html

The other options like Patterson and EFNEO seem only for BSA threaded BB, so I don't think they will work for BB30 shells. They also go overdrive (1:1.6 and 1:1.79) instead of a gear reduction, which means you're almost all the time on overdrive with a loss of efficiency. The Schlumpf drive mountain will most of the time be on 1:1 neutral so you don't lose as much efficiency until you shift down to lower gears with the gear reduction of 1:2.5).

Last edited by tomtomtom123; 07-28-19 at 03:29 PM.
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Old 07-30-19, 10:27 AM
  #396  
chef09
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Thank you for such an in-depth analysis.I wish you were my neighbour! (or at least lived closer) I also wish the guys at the bike shops had this kind of knowledge to draw from. I have a friend that is quite handy with bikes that may have the patience to walk through this with me but he's away until the end of August. I'm going to ride it again today to see how it feels to avoid those gears. I tested it out on the first ride and locked the chain up. After that a few other gears on the small ring were chattery but a simple adjustment of the barrel screw silenced those them. I guess the jamming up of the chain may have stretched something the wrong way..
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Old 07-30-19, 12:24 PM
  #397  
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So what is the reason why you can't use the largest 3 inner cogs when on the outer chaining?

If it's because the chain is too short, you should not ride the bike, because at some point in time you will accidentally shift to those 3 gears and tear out the rear derailleur. You can do a Google search and see images of what it looks like when the chain is too short. The most simple fix is to get a longer chain. You simply cut the chain at a length when the derailleur is just slightly bent when on the big-big combination.
After you do this, if the derailleur cage doesn't have enough chain capacity, then the pulley will drag and make loud noises when on the small-small combination, notifying you to get off that gear, but it won't damage the derailleur.

At the new longer chain length, if the pulley does drag on the small-small, then it may seem as the chain is too to long, but that is not the problem. The problem if the lack of chain capacity, and if so then the only way to solve it is to get another derailleur with a larger capacity, usually with a longer cage. It simply not use the small small. At least there is no damage if you do use it for a few seconds.

But if the chain is really too short, you really should put on a longer chain before you accidentally tear out the rear derailleur.

https://www.google.com/search?q=bike+chain+too+short


From Google search on another bike forum.
https://bicycles.stackexchange.com/q...hain-too-short

Also the big big and small small will always make a lot of noise because the chain is going in at a sharp angle. But if there is noise coming from the front derailleur because the chain is rubbing it, then you should put the bike on a stand and run the chain through the entire gear range to figure out how far to adjust the cable barrel nut and to learn which gears need to use the trim position in the shifter. I think the top end SRAM shifters don't have trim. The Shimano shifters have trim but different series have trim on different sides of the shift. Some of them have trim in between the shift. I use the fd4700 which has trim on the outside of the shift which makes more sense. The instruction manual on the Shimano website for the shifters have diagrams showing which side the trim is on.

Also if there is noise from the chain from it rubbing against the outer chaining when on the small small, then it just means you can't use that gear. If it's the last 3 or 4 cogs on the outside that rubs, you might be able to make one of the gears useable it you space the inner chaining by a few tenths of a millimeter further from the outer chaining.

Last edited by tomtomtom123; 07-30-19 at 12:32 PM.
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Old 07-30-19, 08:52 PM
  #398  
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I took it to another shop today. The bike mechanic said: "the chain seems too short and the Wolf Road-Link is for massive rear cassettes(and showed me one massive MTB bike one). He took off the wolf-link with great difficulty and noticed something that the previous Bike mechanic had done (and had told me but I didn't understand what he meant)- he had machined/ground off some of the hanger width because the addition of the wolflink had skewed the alignment I guess. The guy at the new shop said-you should not grind that part-it's weaker now.
So the new bike shop mechanic is going to add a few links to the chain, put on a MTB derailler (Sram GX Type 2.1 10 speed Long cage/ max cog 36T) $85.00. He then has to replace the hanger for $42.00 and it's about $33.00 for the labour. Total $175 with taxes.
In a way I feel like I should go back to the first bike shop, give them the Wolf link (which is marked up a bit) and the machined hanger and ask for some money back, especially since originally they were to put on a rear derailler but brought in the wrong one and tried something else-which didn't work.
BTW, I did (brain fog) go to the BIG ring- then second biggest cog in back and jammed the chain up. It pulled the derailler into the cassette. Bloody awful. I could have broken a tooth and broken the RD. So by Friday (if everything works) I will have spent $475 for 4 extra teeth. The good news is that I think the new bike shop and their mechanic may be able to help with sourcing a 46/30T crankset. That may be next year's
budget though. My wife still wants/needs a new fridge. ( I get the old one on the deck for BBQ supplies/beer)

I'd put in pics but I haven't had 10 posts yet.

Last edited by chef09; 07-31-19 at 08:52 AM.
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Old 07-31-19, 03:34 AM
  #399  
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Originally Posted by wgscott View Post
I probably should have. Now that I spent more on my White Industries crank and bottom bracket than many people spend on their first bike, I figure I should just make it work for now... (which it does, absolutely fine, BTW, but it still bugs me to have regressed to square taper).
If it works how can it be bad? I love square taper. Itís simple and it just works.
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Old 07-31-19, 09:25 AM
  #400  
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Well, according to this site, the SRAM GX type 2.1 has a chain wrap capacity of 47T. So it should be fine if you replace with a longer chain. If it has the same cable pull ratio as your old 10 speed shifter, then you won't need to change the shifter. SRAM calls the ratio branding on this derailleur "Exact actuation 1:1".
https://www.worldwidecyclery.com/pro...railleur-black
A little bit cheaper in Germany 50€.
https://www.bike-discount.de/en/buy/...g-black-449072

If you're interested to learn how to service a bicycle, you could do all of this yourself for the experience. It's not difficult, maybe 1 hour.
$50 for the new derailleur, $15 for a KMC 10 speed chain, $5-15 for a new hanger (you have to find out which one works with your frame).

3) Changing the derailleur just needs a hex wrench. You would have to cut the old cable end to get it on the new derailleur with a cable cutter, and crimp on a new end cap (pliers are good enough for crimping). If you don't change the shifter, you don't need to change the cable. Takes maybe 5-10 minutes to install.

4) 5 minutes to figure out how long of a chain you need, 5 minutes to break the new chain with a chain breaker and install the new chain.

1) A lot of hangers are produced by Union. They sell them OEM to the bike brands. You can simply buy the hanger directly from an ebay or amazon seller. I got mine for $5. Change the hanger. 5 minutes.
MARWI | Gear hangers - Dahon

2) You would have to bend the hanger into place. I bought the hanger alignment tool for around $25 on sale. It takes some time to learn the first time, but it's pretty simple. 10 minutes for the first time. And it's handy to have the tool in case you hit the derailleur out of alignment in the future, and to check it once in a while.
https://www.bike-discount.de/en/buy/...ent-tool-25599

5) then when everything is installed, check the cable tension and low and high stops. 5 minutes.

Last edited by tomtomtom123; 07-31-19 at 09:32 AM.
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