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For the love of English 3 speeds...

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For the love of English 3 speeds...

Old 01-15-21, 01:17 PM
  #23776  
browngw
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Originally Posted by 2fat2fly View Post
I like how the black looks on that rack, it looks like the same rack I took off the Dunelt I've been working on.
What did you do to smooth out the bad chrome?
The chrome on mine is pitted and peeling. It has the texture of 30 grit sandpaper.
I soaked it in Evapo Rust but the chrome is gone.
On mine, someone had made crude extensions to make the drop arms reach the dropouts, if I can make this thing look presentable,
maybe I'll see about finding or making some round clamps like on yours and put it back on. If not on this one, on something else down the road.
I soaked it in strong cleaning vinegar for a week to remove most of the rust. Seeing the shape it was in, I aggressively sanded with a flapper wheel and by hand. I did not try for a super smooth like new finish. Then it got two coats of spray Krylon black. It has a somewhat" pebbly" finish in places but acceptable for an old bike.

Dragging the bike home.

Sir Wayes A. Tonne as purchased

Needs some work.

After vinegar cleanse. Might as well just stated with sanding.

After paint, awaiting assembly

Not smooth but has saddle bags on it most of the time anyway.
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Old 01-15-21, 01:41 PM
  #23777  
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browngw Your restorative work always leaves me amazed - I have seen some of your bikes in person and they always look fantastic.
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Old 01-15-21, 03:46 PM
  #23778  
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Originally Posted by markk900 View Post
browngw Your restorative work always leaves me amazed - I have seen some of your bikes in person and they always look fantastic.
Thanks for the kind words markk900 . I can spend weeks, months even years on some bikes and not tire of the process. The last really time consuming resto was this 1972 CCM that belonged to a late friend. Hopefully when the Canadian Vintage Bicycle Show gets back under way, I can show it and others. On this one I even learned how to repair Bluemels mudguards.
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Old 01-15-21, 04:28 PM
  #23779  
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Originally Posted by michaelcummings View Post
Not starting an argument, we all do what we think best.

In my case, the rust had already started a stress fracture, so cleaning up the rust didn't help.
My chain worked fine, until I stood up on the pedals and pushed down hard.

Just before the chain broke, my foot was standing on the pedal.
A moment later, that foot was planted on the ground while the bike and the rest of my body continued onward.

It was not a controlled landing.

I was in pain and at risk of never having children

Anyhow, that is my $.02 about why I hate rusty chains.
Good name for a band....
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Old 01-15-21, 06:51 PM
  #23780  
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Looks like the same rack

After cleaning, the chrome is pitted and peeling all over, I soaked it in Evapo-rust first, over night, but it still had lots of rust. I got impatient and soaked it in 20% hydroflouric acid, (old school wire wheel cleaner).
Some filler primer and some black paint is likely the only option
Does anyone know if these were English made? I was sort of thinking they were just a cheap all purpose rack?
I've seen a few though and all were on English bikes.



As found




After soaking in Hydroflouric acid for 20 minutes
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Old 01-15-21, 09:45 PM
  #23781  
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Originally Posted by Unca_Sam View Post
I think it's very likely uneconomical to produce chromed steel rims in ISO 590 or 597 for anything less then what they charge for them now, when they're available. I have the same problem with the original wheelset on the Hercules I just finished; too much chrome loss and pitting on the rims, plus a bad front bearing. Had the bearing been good, I might have finished clearing the rust and flaking chrome with the dremel wire brush, and still ridden on them (with junk brake pads). If the rust kept coming, I'd likely eventually paint them. Luckily, there was the set of wheels I'm using at the co-op. If you have a bike kitchen or a co-op near you, I recommend you check there for parts.
I still want to unlace the wheel to salvage the SA AW hub from 1960, but you're right that finding a 40* rim in ISO 590 size is difficult. I know that there was a pair of tandem rims at the co op drilled for 40* and 36*, but I'd have to find a 5 speed frame and an AW hub with the longer axle for parts. It'd be easier to just sell the hub. rather than invest that kind of money into an oddball bike, probably on a Hi-Ten frame without much intrinsic value on its own. Although...the guys at the Co-Op might get a kick out of that kind of project...
The problem is I don't see any available now, at least not in 32/40h. The local shops don't sell parts, none seem to these days, and the one's I see listed online are cheap Chinese steel rims in 36h. I've spoke to a few old bike shops via email and I can muster up a few pairs of vintage 36h rims but their made in Italy and a bit wider.
The only 32 and 40h rims I've seen have been overseas and extremely expensive. Most have been Sturmey Archer branded so they're not correct for an older model bike.

The few new steel replacement rims I've seen have been not much better than department store grade at best.
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Old 01-16-21, 06:15 PM
  #23782  
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Originally Posted by gster View Post
Buyers Remorse
My own fault as I should have been more thorough.
Front forks are askew, pushed to one side but I reefed on them by hand
and they're better.
Handlebars are also a bit off but will need a vice and a pipe to correct.
<pic>
Cranks have been aligned and the seat clamp reversed.
There's another one in town, a non rider on display at a book shop.
I may ask the owner to give it me to make one good bike and then
give it to him when I leave..
At least it's a project......
I was sort of thinking that thing look a bit rough, the painted chrome and Chinese saddle gave me a bad impression of it. . It had he looks of something that was thrown together just to flip. The bent forks and bars sound like it was something that was laying in some yard somewhere getting walked on before being put back together.

I picked up a ladies Raleigh Sports for $40 a while back, the bike rode great, but I bought it for parts.
I actually rode the bike for a mile or two before coming back and stripping it. I needed the fork, cg, and wheels for a men's frame I had here. Before mounting up the fork, I put it in the gauge and both blades were an inch off to the left and the left fork was back 1/4". Yet the bike rode fine like that. I straightened the fork, put the bike together and all was fine. The parts bike looked decent, the bent fork wasn't at all obvious. I used the wheels, forks, and cg from the ladies bike, plus swapped over the Prestube rear rack. The guy who sold me the parts bike said it had been used in the city when his wife was in college years ago, so it likely got some abuse while being parked in the bike rack. A good solid kick is all it takes. I had a Schwinn that came to me with a fork bent off to one side years ago, when I straightened the fork, the bike pulled hard to the left. A former shop owner told me someone likely bent the fork to fix the pull. It turned out that the rear of the frame was bent upward on the left side about 3/8", something that didn't really show until we put a frame gauge to it.

You may be able to better straighten the forks with a long board tied or taped to one blade at a time. The longer the lever the more control you'll have. A string can be used to measure with. I've seen homemade fork gauges made from string, cardboard, or even wood. The easiest to use I've seen was a piece of 1/4" all thread rod with length of wood or metal that reaches nearly up to the fork crown. So long as the gauge stick and rod are square at 90 degrees, it'll work.

Here's a simple to make gauge. Make sure the rod or gauge bar is centered between the fork ends, then bend the blades to center the gauge bar between the fork blades at the crown. .



Homemade fork gauge


.
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Old 01-16-21, 06:37 PM
  #23783  
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Originally Posted by dirtman View Post
I was sort of thinking that thing look a bit rough, the painted chrome and Chinese saddle gave me a bad impression of it. . It had he looks of something that was thrown together just to flip. The bent forks and bars sound like it was something that was laying in some yard somewhere getting walked on before being put back together.

I picked up a ladies Raleigh Sports for $40 a while back, the bike rode great, but I bought it for parts.
I actually rode the bike for a mile or two before coming back and stripping it. I needed the fork, cg, and wheels for a men's frame I had here. Before mounting up the fork, I put it in the gauge and both blades were an inch off to the left and the left fork was back 1/4". Yet the bike rode fine like that. I straightened the fork, put the bike together and all was fine. The parts bike looked decent, the bent fork wasn't at all obvious. I used the wheels, forks, and cg from the ladies bike, plus swapped over the Prestube rear rack. The guy who sold me the parts bike said it had been used in the city when his wife was in college years ago, so it likely got some abuse while being parked in the bike rack. A good solid kick is all it takes. I had a Schwinn that came to me with a fork bent off to one side years ago, when I straightened the fork, the bike pulled hard to the left. A former shop owner told me someone likely bent the fork to fix the pull. It turned out that the rear of the frame was bent upward on the left side about 3/8", something that didn't really show until we put a frame gauge to it.

You may be able to better straighten the forks with a long board tied or taped to one blade at a time. The longer the lever the more control you'll have. A string can be used to measure with. I've seen homemade fork gauges made from string, cardboard, or even wood. The easiest to use I've seen was a piece of 1/4" all thread rod with length of wood or metal that reaches nearly up to the fork crown. So long as the gauge stick and rod are square at 90 degrees, it'll work.

Here's a simple to make gauge. Make sure the rod or gauge bar is centered between the fork ends, then bend the blades to center the gauge bar between the fork blades at the crown. .



Homemade fork gauge


.
Yeah....
I agree.
I'm not out too much and I like trying to fix stuff.
I am riding it.
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Old 01-16-21, 06:37 PM
  #23784  
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Originally Posted by dirtman View Post
I was sort of thinking that thing look a bit rough, the painted chrome and Chinese saddle gave me a bad impression of it. . It had he looks of something that was thrown together just to flip. The bent forks and bars sound like it was something that was laying in some yard somewhere getting walked on before being put back together.

I picked up a ladies Raleigh Sports for $40 a while back, the bike rode great, but I bought it for parts.
I actually rode the bike for a mile or two before coming back and stripping it. I needed the fork, cg, and wheels for a men's frame I had here. Before mounting up the fork, I put it in the gauge and both blades were an inch off to the left and the left fork was back 1/4". Yet the bike rode fine like that. I straightened the fork, put the bike together and all was fine. The parts bike looked decent, the bent fork wasn't at all obvious. I used the wheels, forks, and cg from the ladies bike, plus swapped over the Prestube rear rack. The guy who sold me the parts bike said it had been used in the city when his wife was in college years ago, so it likely got some abuse while being parked in the bike rack. A good solid kick is all it takes. I had a Schwinn that came to me with a fork bent off to one side years ago, when I straightened the fork, the bike pulled hard to the left. A former shop owner told me someone likely bent the fork to fix the pull. It turned out that the rear of the frame was bent upward on the left side about 3/8", something that didn't really show until we put a frame gauge to it.

You may be able to better straighten the forks with a long board tied or taped to one blade at a time. The longer the lever the more control you'll have. A string can be used to measure with. I've seen homemade fork gauges made from string, cardboard, or even wood. The easiest to use I've seen was a piece of 1/4" all thread rod with length of wood or metal that reaches nearly up to the fork crown. So long as the gauge stick and rod are square at 90 degrees, it'll work.

Here's a simple to make gauge. Make sure the rod or gauge bar is centered between the fork ends, then bend the blades to center the gauge bar between the fork blades at the crown. .



Homemade fork gauge


.
Yeah....
I agree.
I'm not out too much and I like trying to fix stuff.
I am riding it.
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Old 01-16-21, 10:11 PM
  #23785  
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Originally Posted by gster View Post
Yeah....
I agree.
I'm not out too much and I like trying to fix stuff.
I am riding it.
How bad are the wheels?
How old did it turn out to be?
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Old 01-17-21, 01:07 AM
  #23786  
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I figured I'd ask here, seeing as the For Trade thread isn't as 3-speed oriented as here:

Would anyone happen to have a 1974-1976 silver Raleigh Sports chainguard like the one in the catalog photo?




I really don't care for the later 1977+ version on my silver Sports, and wouldn't mind doing a direct swap, or a trade for other bits.




-Kurt
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Old 01-17-21, 02:24 AM
  #23787  
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Spent some time today putting the Dunelt back together with what I have. For now, its got the wheels and tires I found it with.
I spent an hour getting the chainguard to fit right, and another two hours getting the fenders to fit and sit right on the bike. They were so mangled when I found it it took a hour each just banging out dents to get them somewhat usable.
This is the result of polishing, lots of rust removal, all new bearings, some time with an air brush touching up the really bad spots, and some used car 'glaze' to make it shine.
Don't mind the big greasy finger prints on it, it was 3am by the time I took it off the stand for a quick ride.
I still need to put a front brake cable on it and I still need to adjust a few things but until I find a good donor set of wheels, its as good as it gets for now. The wheels on it are the result of lots of hydroflouric acid and scrubbing, the rear wheel is badly pitted, I just left it as is for now, its not worth messing with other than spraying it down with some wax to prevent it from rusting up again.
The front wheel is straight but has a ton of brake wear. Ride wise, its obviously night and day from the few test rides I took when I first brought it home. It is too small for me, but its usable for now. A proper back wheel, shifter and cable would do wonders for it.
I was talking to another English three speed enthusiast I met locally and he said that the rear wheel may have had an SW hub, which likely failed and got tossed, thus the coaster brake conversion. I think that only makes sense if the bike is older than 1960. What year did they lose the full chainguard boss on the chain stay?

Here's an 'as found' pic and one I took today:



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Old 01-17-21, 08:15 AM
  #23788  
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Originally Posted by dirtman View Post
How bad are the wheels?
How old did it turn out to be?
Wheels are OK. Rusty spokes and rims sprayed silver.
Unsure on the age but would guess late 50's/early 60's.
It has a "C" headlamp bracket which stands for Condor
This was Benotto's first company before the Benotto line of bikes..
i'ts basically a DL-1 frame with a double bar.
very heavy
living in a big city (Toronto) you take it for granted access to parts and supplies.
I'm in need of a cotter pin...
I can order from Amazon Mexico or try the next town over (Bucerias) that has a bike shop.
It's a 30 minute bus ride away.
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Old 01-17-21, 08:28 AM
  #23789  
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Originally Posted by 2fat2fly View Post
Spent some time today putting the Dunelt back together with what I have. For now, its got the wheels and tires I found it with.
I spent an hour getting the chainguard to fit right, and another two hours getting the fenders to fit and sit right on the bike. They were so mangled when I found it it took a hour each just banging out dents to get them somewhat usable.
This is the result of polishing, lots of rust removal, all new bearings, some time with an air brush touching up the really bad spots, and some used car 'glaze' to make it shine.
Don't mind the big greasy finger prints on it, it was 3am by the time I took it off the stand for a quick ride.
I still need to put a front brake cable on it and I still need to adjust a few things but until I find a good donor set of wheels, its as good as it gets for now. The wheels on it are the result of lots of hydroflouric acid and scrubbing, the rear wheel is badly pitted, I just left it as is for now, its not worth messing with other than spraying it down with some wax to prevent it from rusting up again.
The front wheel is straight but has a ton of brake wear. Ride wise, its obviously night and day from the few test rides I took when I first brought it home. It is too small for me, but its usable for now. A proper back wheel, shifter and cable would do wonders for it.
I was talking to another English three speed enthusiast I met locally and he said that the rear wheel may have had an SW hub, which likely failed and got tossed, thus the coaster brake conversion. I think that only makes sense if the bike is older than 1960. What year did they lose the full chainguard boss on the chain stay?

Here's an 'as found' pic and one I took today:



Night and day
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Old 01-17-21, 08:38 AM
  #23790  
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I came up with an inexpensive and easy to use rig for straightening my 1957 Birmingham Gazelle's bent forks. Using some chain I had laying around, a couple of large turnbuckles, threaded rod and some nuts/bolts/washers, I came up with this. Rather than push the forks into alignment, I spun the forks around and pulled them into alignment by tightening the turnbuckles. A picture is worth a thousand words, so this picture will show my basic rig-it has the benefit of pulling one or the other fork leg in case they are bent out of symetry and the turnbuckles can micro-adjust pressure, rather that the bumper jack ratchet style fork straighteners. Anyway, last two pics are before and after-notice gap between front fender and downtube to see improvement.


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Old 01-17-21, 09:16 AM
  #23791  
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Originally Posted by JIMBO53 View Post
I came up with an inexpensive and easy to use rig for straightening my 1957 Birmingham Gazelle's bent forks. Using some chain I had laying around, a couple of large turnbuckles, threaded rod and some nuts/bolts/washers, I came up with this. Rather than push the forks into alignment, I spun the forks around and pulled them into alignment by tightening the turnbuckles. A picture is worth a thousand words, so this picture will show my basic rig-it has the benefit of pulling one or the other fork leg in case they are bent out of symetry and the turnbuckles can micro-adjust pressure, rather that the bumper jack ratchet style fork straighteners. Anyway, last two pics are before and after-notice gap between front fender and downtube to see improvement.
Necessity is the mother of invention, isn't it? Well done.
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Old 01-17-21, 06:55 PM
  #23792  
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Mongrel Lenton

I have a front and rear hub to build an extra set of wheels for the mongrel Lenton. I have a 40 hole fm, and an steel 32 hole front hub which appears to be English.

What should I use for rims? I am thinking 700c, so I have looked at zac19s, sun cr18(Is 40 hole available?), velocity might have something also. I am also looking at rigita superchromix 27 inch, but I already have a have set of ea1 wheels.

I would appreciate any input.



Mongrel lenton


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Old 01-17-21, 07:38 PM
  #23793  
2fat2fly
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Originally Posted by gster View Post
Night and day
I did some final adjustments, added the front brake cable, and gave the whole bike a coat of wax. I took it for an hour long ride this afternoon. The bike really rides nice,
I think I like the idea of it being a single speed. Maybe if I find a good rear rim to build it'll be a single speed coaster and I'll add another caliper?
The tires are old, but they survived, and will likely survive till I do something about the wheels. For now its ridable and looks a lot better than it did when I dragged it home. With the roughness on the front rim, the old John Bull pads stop pretty well now once it took off the petrified layer of rubber.
The getting the chainguard to fit right too some doing, I had trouble getting it far enough inward to not rub the cranks or chain.I suppose the Komet hub doesn't give the same chain line as an AW hub, but the sprocket is flipped outward and there's not much room for it to move any further outward. As it is now I had to file a bit off the rear cg screw on the inside so it didn't rub the chain. I managed to get it to ride pretty much dead center down the middle of the CG with about 1/8" of crank arm clearance.
If I find the right colors, maybe in a paint pen, I'll re-colorize the headbadge and fender badge too, The brass polished up pretty decent. Most of the blue is gone from the vertical bar section of the badges.
If the rear rim wasn't just pitted bare steel the thing would really look good even up close, but even so it looks pretty good as it is compared to what I started with just over 2 weeks ago.

For now I'm going to consider it done and use it till either I find a better set of wheels or I trade it for something I like better.
The only problem is the amount of time I've got in it, far more than the thing is worth, but the good thing is it didn't take much out of pocket, maybe $120 total counting buying the bike.

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Old 01-17-21, 07:53 PM
  #23794  
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Originally Posted by bluesteak View Post
I am thinking 700c, so I have looked at zac19s, sun cr18(Is 40 hole available?)
You can lace a 40 hole hub to a 32 hole rim, it's not that bad of a build actually.

https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...-hole-rim.html
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Old 01-17-21, 09:02 PM
  #23795  
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Originally Posted by bluesteak View Post
I have a front and rear hub to build an extra set of wheels for the mongrel Lenton. I have a 40 hole fm, and an steel 32 hole front hub which appears to be English.

What should I use for rims? I am thinking 700c, so I have looked at zac19s, sun cr18(Is 40 hole available?), velocity might have something also. I am also looking at rigita superchromix 27 inch, but I already have a have set of ea1 wheels.

I would appreciate any input.
... .... .....
Most tandem bikes use 40h wheels, find a tandem specialty shop, there should be a fairly decent array or rims available.
I just laced a pair of newer Weinmann rims up for a buddy. He plans to run 35-700c tires on them on a 2000 something tandem.
Not sure of the model of rim, he had stripped off all the labels and polished them to a mirror finish before bringing them to me.
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Old 01-17-21, 09:12 PM
  #23796  
oldspokes
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Originally Posted by 2fat2fly View Post
I did some final adjustments, added the front brake cable, and gave the whole bike a coat of wax. I took it for an hour long ride this afternoon. The bike really rides nice,
I think I like the idea of it being a single speed. Maybe if I find a good rear rim to build it'll be a single speed coaster and I'll add another caliper?
The tires are old, but they survived, and will likely survive till I do something about the wheels. For now its ridable and looks a lot better than it did when I dragged it home. With the roughness on the front rim, the old John Bull pads stop pretty well now once it took off the petrified layer of rubber.
The getting the chainguard to fit right too some doing, I had trouble getting it far enough inward to not rub the cranks or chain.I suppose the Komet hub doesn't give the same chain line as an AW hub, but the sprocket is flipped outward and there's not much room for it to move any further outward. As it is now I had to file a bit off the rear cg screw on the inside so it didn't rub the chain. I managed to get it to ride pretty much dead center down the middle of the CG with about 1/8" of crank arm clearance.
If I find the right colors, maybe in a paint pen, I'll re-colorize the headbadge and fender badge too, The brass polished up pretty decent. Most of the blue is gone from the vertical bar section of the badges.
If the rear rim wasn't just pitted bare steel the thing would really look good even up close, but even so it looks pretty good as it is compared to what I started with just over 2 weeks ago.

For now I'm going to consider it done and use it till either I find a better set of wheels or I trade it for something I like better.
The only problem is the amount of time I've got in it, far more than the thing is worth, but the good thing is it didn't take much out of pocket, maybe $120 total counting buying the bike.

That's a pretty amazing transformation. It just goes to show what a little elbow grease, some touch up paint and some polish will do for an old neglected bike. An old boss of mine would have said "You turned a sow's ear into a silk purse".
Sooner or later a good 40h rim or a good wheelset will turn up, at least in the meantime you have something to ride.
The worn sidewalls on the front wouldn't bother me much, with regular use the rim should stay pretty rust free if kept indoors.
It'll also make finding a suitable match in 40h a bit easier. You won't need to find a new looking rim to make it match the bike.
95% of all vintage steel wheel bikes I see these days have rim wear or rust, I'm not sure what people do to them around here but rims really take a beating on bikes. Rarely do I find a bike with good wheels these days, no matter how old it is.
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Old 01-17-21, 09:23 PM
  #23797  
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Originally Posted by JIMBO53 View Post
I came up with an inexpensive and easy to use rig for straightening my 1957 Birmingham Gazelle's bent forks. Using some chain I had laying around, a couple of large turnbuckles, threaded rod and some nuts/bolts/washers, I came up with this. Rather than push the forks into alignment, I spun the forks around and pulled them into alignment by tightening the turnbuckles. A picture is worth a thousand words, so this picture will show my basic rig-it has the benefit of pulling one or the other fork leg in case they are bent out of symetry and the turnbuckles can micro-adjust pressure, rather that the bumper jack ratchet style fork straighteners. Anyway, last two pics are before and after-notice gap between front fender and downtube to see improvement.


very clever!
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Old 01-17-21, 10:57 PM
  #23798  
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Originally Posted by JIMBO53 View Post
I came up with an inexpensive and easy to use rig for straightening my 1957 Birmingham Gazelle's bent forks. Using some chain I had laying around, a couple of large turnbuckles, threaded rod and some nuts/bolts/washers, I came up with this. Rather than push the forks into alignment, I spun the forks around and pulled them into alignment by tightening the turnbuckles. A picture is worth a thousand words, so this picture will show my basic rig-it has the benefit of pulling one or the other fork leg in case they are bent out of symetry and the turnbuckles can micro-adjust pressure, rather that the bumper jack ratchet style fork straighteners. Anyway, last two pics are before and after-notice gap between front fender and downtube to see improvement.


I like the idea but there could be a few issues with pulling forks like that, first is that the force is against the headset bearings, second is the fact that many forks may bend at their narrowest point rather than where you need them to bend. You could inadvertently add curvature to the fork tips and not bend the blades enough at the fork crown. Maybe a piece of 2x4 with two eye bolts on each side placed lower on the fork blades would make work better. I know from using a Park set up that its easy to bend the ends of the bladed but not so with the wider part of the blades. Not removing the fork from the bike also doesn't let you inspect for cracks where the steer tube meets the crown, or any bend in the steer tube itself.
I'm not saying what you have there doesn't work, I'm just pointing out what could go wrong if you don't pay close attention.
I've straightened dozens of forks and frames over the years, both with the right tools and on occasion with what ever I had on hand at the time. Sometimes all it takes is a 2x4 and a big tree as an anchor point to bend things back in shape. My first fork straightener was about a 6ft 2x4 with an 8" piece I cut off the end used to apply pressure up and down the fork where it was needed leveraging off the fork crown with the end of the 2x4.

I'm no artist but maybe this will help.
This will apply pressure to the fork crown and not so much to the headset and frame.
Its crude but it works in a pinch.



2x3 or 2x4 will work
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Old 01-18-21, 02:46 AM
  #23799  
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In my search for rims I found these yesterday at defunct bike shop, they're all 36h, they're a bit wider than a Sturmey Archer or Dunlop Endrick rim but not by much. 2mm at best due to s slight sidewall flare.
They're marked 26x1 3/8" Beretta Made in Italy. The guy has these in pairs as a built front wheel and a bare rim to build a matching rear.
He said they all came from a bike shop that closed in 1972, they've been in boxes in his trailer ever since.
The boxes are unmarked and have Italia Post labels on them, so they were direct imported in those boxes, three pair per box, three fronts, three bare rims. They're not what I was after but I'm curious as to what they fit or if they came on any bikes back in the day?
I don't remember seeing these before. Each of the boxes had 14 "Pacci Postale 1000 Lira" stamps on each one addressed to a bike shop in NJ. They looked like they had been there for a long time. I wish they were 32/40h rims though. I left them but will be going back for a few other items he's got which I didn't have room for in the car.
He also had quite a few 27" rims new in the box, maybe 30 boxes or so of them, in various brands.


"26X1 3/8 BERETTA MADE IN ITALY"
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Old 01-18-21, 11:18 AM
  #23800  
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Originally Posted by jackbombay View Post
You can lace a 40 hole hub to a 32 hole rim, it's not that bad of a build actually.

https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...-hole-rim.html
I have seen that, but I like the 40 hole, 4 cross layout and I am pretty sure I can get rims.

actually the 40/32 system is about ideal for most practical bikes.
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