Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
Reload this Page >

How to teach your girlfriend, others to skip stop

Notices
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

How to teach your girlfriend, others to skip stop

Old 03-01-08, 04:28 PM
  #1  
sp00ki
partly metal, partly real
Thread Starter
 
sp00ki's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Philadelphia.
Posts: 3,597

Bikes: Hummer H2

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
How to teach your girlfriend, others to skip stop

It took me awhile to learn to skip stop.
For whatever reason, no matter what tips, tricks, explanations, analogies, etc. people gave me, i couldn't quite fit all the movements together properly. Pretty frustrating.
When i fiinally did learn to skip, i was overwhelmed with a sense of accomplisment, which was quickly replaced with confusion as to why it took me so long. After all, once you get how it works, you realize what a simple technique skip/skid stopping really is.

I started trying to help my girlfriend learn to skip stop awhile ago, to no avail. She got it (i think) a few isolated times, but in no way had it down consistently. Shifting weight did nothing, positioning herself foward did nothing... nothing worked. We eventually gave it up, as she has no real problems stopping sans brake anyway, and has one when she needs it.

Fast forward to this morning. I woke up and decided to work on popping my back wheel (i want to start playing that game involving passing and hitting a ball into a net with your wheel instead of a polo stick). Unfortunately, i did a lot more locking of my rear than actually hitting a ball anywhere. After a few minutes, though, i'd realized i'd been inadvertently doing some pretty deep skips without wanting to. A lightbulb went off in my head.
I added an upstroke with my left leg-- even better.
I immediately texted my girlfriend: "I'm going to teach you to skid today."

After only a few minutes of her getting home, she was skipping up and down the block, consistently. She's stoked.
Here's the explanation i gave her:

1) pick up a bit of speed, but not much. go up and down the block twice, being aware of every time your strong leg (right side, in her case) is farthest back, horizontal with the ground.
2) on your way back the third time, do the same thing. this time, jump off of your back pedal (the same one you identified in #1) when it's in that "farthest back, horizontal with the ground" position. don't try to push down, but rather jump off of it like it was solid ground. remember to keep a good speed-- it's lots harder when you're going slow. Think 15mph or up.
3) if you haven't skipped already, come back up the block again, this time trying to jump high (remember, your pedal should be back and horizontal with the street right as you spring off of it). By the time you get to the end of the block, you'll be skipping every time. do not concern yourself with pulling up with the other leg yet-- just worry about jumping with the back leg.
4) after you can hear a little skip consistently, add pulling up hard with the front leg. Imagine yourself jumping to fly like superman; right leg springing straight out, left leg up in the air.

This technique worked perfectly for her. She's skipping as consistently as i was weeks after learning to skip stop myself. I bet by next week she'll be strong enough to hold her skids.
Incidentally, her gearing is 42 x 15. Not the easiest gearing, but not a tough one. Doing this might be harder as your gearing goes up. Similarly, she's probably 120lbs. Smaller framed people might also have a tougher time.
Anyway, this is the advice i'm giving from now on. Everything else will come naturally.

Last edited by sp00ki; 03-01-08 at 05:51 PM.
sp00ki is offline  
Old 03-01-08, 05:09 PM
  #2  
pazzmore
Senior Member
 
pazzmore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: tucson
Posts: 271

Bikes: 2007 IRO Mark V fixed, 1971 Schwinn Spitfire stock newsie cruiser, 60's Schwinn Collegiate single speed, 1984 Azuki Imperial fixed, old unknown brand Tandem fixed.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
good advice. trying to explain some of these techniques can be difficult.
pazzmore is offline  
Old 03-01-08, 05:39 PM
  #3  
Commuter8
DougieD
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Halifax, NS, Canada
Posts: 39

Bikes: Fixie, Hybrid

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
This is a very cool explanation. I will try it this week, as I have only been able to lock up on snow so far.
Commuter8 is offline  
Old 03-01-08, 07:10 PM
  #4  
hudsong
North American Scum
 
hudsong's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 273

Bikes: Swobo Sanchez

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Clips and straps/clips/power grips make it soooo much easier. I get so much torque with mine I can spin the wheel the other direction while skidding.
hudsong is offline  
Old 03-01-08, 09:02 PM
  #5  
j0e_bik3
"this is not suck"
 
j0e_bik3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 387
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
the thing that helped me was learning the "hop off the back-catch the seat" dismount, because that showed me that the back pedal coming up will un-weight you, all you need to do is stiffen that leg, and then skipping, and skidding just came naturally.

the hop off move is done at lower speed, and will help build confidence, and should be easy to teach, THEN she'll get the un-weight technique, and once the weight is off the rear wheel, it locks, and skips quite easily.

also a concrete or asphalt bike path with some grass on the sides makes it a little easier too.

I found that when teaching people complicated, or unusual physical skills (skate moves, gymnastic moves, fly fishing(casting) etc,...) where you are performing several techniques in sequence, and trying to learn not only the move, but also the timing, breaking it down into sections, so they learn a step at a time, and then can string it all together, has been quite successful for me so far.
j0e_bik3 is offline  
Old 03-01-08, 09:04 PM
  #6  
willypilgrim
71 Peugeot. fixed.
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Twin Cities
Posts: 1,159
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'll try telling people that next time i know someone who can't get it down.

all it took for me was one day of trying and i had it down. i had a much harder time learning trackstands.
willypilgrim is offline  
Old 03-01-08, 09:34 PM
  #7  
Gyeswho
Utilitarian Boy
 
Gyeswho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Bronx, NY
Posts: 3,235

Bikes: Check the sig to find out

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
I've just gone with "back leg pushes on pedal, front leg pulls up" and bingo folks have it.
Gyeswho is offline  
Old 03-01-08, 09:36 PM
  #8  
j0e_bik3
"this is not suck"
 
j0e_bik3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 387
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by willypilgrim View Post
I'll try telling people that next time i know someone who can't get it down.

all it took for me was one day of trying and i had it down. i had a much harder time learning trackstands.
I STILL can't do em right:

the way that feels natural is with the wheel pointing AWAY from the front foot, and thats backwards, but I can stand longer like that, than with the wheel pointing towards the front foot.

I can't teach myself apparently
j0e_bik3 is offline  
Old 03-01-08, 10:06 PM
  #9  
RaeFixie
Bad News
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 397
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
sorry but im lost... can anyone simplify this for me lol...

do u mean try to lift the rearwheel to skid?
RaeFixie is offline  
Old 03-01-08, 10:22 PM
  #10  
AfterThisNap
Taking "s" outta "Fast"
 
AfterThisNap's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Zoo York City
Posts: 1,989
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I got off the interwebs looking for advice about skidding and spent keyboard time just roding with my GF. Now she can skid and I get get twice as many BJs in a week! Tis great!
AfterThisNap is offline  
Old 03-01-08, 10:41 PM
  #11  
ryansexton
ALL PARTY
 
ryansexton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 664

Bikes: Douglas Touring Cross Wise, Urbanite Fixed Gear

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Is there a difference between skips and skids? Or is it just two different words?

I can't master the sit down skid, I practice on snow a lot of the time, because thats usually how I learn to do things. I can do it when its icy, and for a quick second when the roads are slick with rain, but no luck on dry pavement. I've tried many techniques, still nothing.
ryansexton is offline  
Old 03-01-08, 10:43 PM
  #12  
Velocitą
live.fast.ride.faster
 
Velocitą's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Seattle/Bellingham, WA
Posts: 179
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by RaeFixie View Post
sorry but im lost... can anyone simplify this for me lol...

do u mean try to lift the rearwheel to skid?
its a skip instead of a skid. the rear wheel is lifted off the ground for an instant and done several times consecutively to slow yourself down. with a skid the rear wheel never leaves the ground
Velocitą is offline  
Old 03-01-08, 11:47 PM
  #13  
MattFashion
MattFashion
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: lancaster, pa
Posts: 173

Bikes: 70's le Tour with brazed track drops

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
ok, here's a question for you.
i can skid, and skip, but have never really had to stop in a hurry (for oncoming traffic or an old lady or what have you)
which slows the most effectively?
and before one of you says 'a brake', i'm well aware that a brake would slow me down faster.
thanks
MattFashion is offline  
Old 03-01-08, 11:57 PM
  #14  
streetlightpoet
Banned.
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Lexington, KY
Posts: 668

Bikes: Masi Speciale Fixed, Surly 1x1, 2 70's Bianchi folders, Swingbike, Columbia Cruiser 3 spd, Specialized Big Hit and P.2, Cove G-Spot, Xtracycled Bianchi San Jose.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I think skips are good for scrubbing speed, although feel super squirrelly when you are actually spinning. Skids I think stop a little better but both depend on how much weight you keep on the back wheel. For max stopping power when I am not feeling like using my brake I will throw a skid and start to shift my weight back towards the saddle once it's locked in.
streetlightpoet is offline  
Old 03-02-08, 12:11 AM
  #15  
MattFashion
MattFashion
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: lancaster, pa
Posts: 173

Bikes: 70's le Tour with brazed track drops

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
ahh good point.
MattFashion is offline  
Old 03-02-08, 12:30 AM
  #16  
conor
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 685
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by MattFashion View Post
ok, here's a question for you.
i can skid, and skip, but have never really had to stop in a hurry (for oncoming traffic or an old lady or what have you)
which slows the most effectively?
and before one of you says 'a brake', i'm well aware that a brake would slow me down faster.
thanks
i'm going to guess that the quickest change in momentum will come from a collision with said traffic or lady. (i should know from experience.)
conor is offline  
Old 03-02-08, 01:02 AM
  #17  
MattFashion
MattFashion
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: lancaster, pa
Posts: 173

Bikes: 70's le Tour with brazed track drops

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
^ also a good and valid point!
haha
MattFashion is offline  
Old 03-02-08, 01:12 AM
  #18  
thanks
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: seattle
Posts: 76
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
i've found that whipping a skid out to the side is the fastest way to stop (sans brake). the more sideways your rear wheel goes the faster you stop. but you obviously cant do this in tight spaces (ie traffic) and it's hell on your tires.
thanks is offline  
Old 03-02-08, 02:34 AM
  #19  
mander
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Van BC
Posts: 3,744
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by streetlightpoet View Post
I think skips are good for scrubbing speed, although feel super squirrelly when you are actually spinning. Skids I think stop a little better but both depend on how much weight you keep on the back wheel.
This is wrong, I think. Once your tire has broken traction with the road it's lost most of its stopping power. Most of your power in a skid comes from the point just before the tire loses traction. So, other things being equal a series of skips will be better for slowing down in a hurry than a straight skid over the same distance. It's basically a very low tech version of ABS. Of course, adding a front brake makes a much bigger difference.

Disclaimer: I'm not a real bike physics nerd, I just play one on bikeforums... someone may correct or add to what I've said here.
mander is offline  
Old 03-02-08, 03:07 AM
  #20  
MattFashion
MattFashion
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: lancaster, pa
Posts: 173

Bikes: 70's le Tour with brazed track drops

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
in theory your statement makes complete sense.
but i think it would be a matter of riding ability, strength, and comfort.
the fastest way to slow down would be to resist forward pedal motion with your legs without breaking traction, and you would need some serious legs to effectively do this consistently.
skipping and skidding would take the muscle out of the equation without sacrificing tooo much stopping distance.
i think thats the real world scenario.
think of it as ABS, but for the Flintstones.
MattFashion is offline  
Old 03-02-08, 06:12 AM
  #21  
nelzar13
Senior Member
 
nelzar13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Coventry RI
Posts: 293

Bikes: 1958 raleigh fixed , specialized P2, standard S250, giant cross country bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
the combanation of both is the way to go think anti lock brakeson a car skip left foot back then right foot bck throw a qwick wippd out skid in the walla you standing on to feet at a dead stop
nelzar13 is offline  
Old 03-02-08, 07:23 AM
  #22  
Oh No
TARCK BIKE DOT COM
 
Oh No's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: 610 tarck bike city
Posts: 1,018

Bikes: your mother on wheeeeeelz

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Hockey Stop.
Oh No is offline  
Old 03-02-08, 08:10 AM
  #23  
ryansexton
ALL PARTY
 
ryansexton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 664

Bikes: Douglas Touring Cross Wise, Urbanite Fixed Gear

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Oh No View Post
Hockey Stop.
Backed. Nothing says stop like turning 90 degrees.
ryansexton is offline  
Old 03-02-08, 10:55 AM
  #24  
mander
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Van BC
Posts: 3,744
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Hey spooky, there is one minor flaw in your writeup. You say that people should put their strong leg in the back when learning to skip. This is true for a lot of people (since there are so many right handed regular footers), but not everyone. What you really want to do is have your dominant foot forward. As a right handed goofy footer, my strong leg goes in the front in my preferred skating/ track standing/ skipping position.
mander is offline  
Old 03-02-08, 10:57 AM
  #25  
Zombie Carl
Are we not men?
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Amsterdam for now
Posts: 1,275
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by mander View Post
As a right handed goofy footer, my strong leg goes in the front in my preferred skating/ track standing/ skipping position.
That just makes you a mutant.
Zombie Carl is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.