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Help Me Decide - Clip On Aero Bar

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Help Me Decide - Clip On Aero Bar

Old 01-06-20, 08:15 AM
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firebird854
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Help Me Decide - Clip On Aero Bar

Hello,

I've been mulling over this decision for an extremely long time and thought the great advice of the Bike Forum might help me pull the trigger with no regrets.

First, the following are the reasons/activities I intend on using aero bars for: Long distance, so far my furthest ride has been 228 miles, I'd really like to up that to 300+ and participate in the multiple 12hr and 24hr events in my area. Second, I want to get into Triathalon and Duathlon, I'd like to take a stab at most distances, maybe even an IM in fall (currently getting ready for a marathon in Spring). Lastly, I want to participate in the various time trials like the Wisconsin State Championship time trial without being at too much of a disadvantage.

The reason why this has been a challenge is my stupid handlebars, I got a great deal on a Bontrager XXX carbon handlebar+stem but the flare for the stem makes it impossible to attach any conventional aero bars:



So, sadly, I'll need a new handlebar+stem+aero bars for this to be successful, which can become quite pricey.

One of the best options I've come across which I've been seriously considering is this sweet combo drop bar + aero bar from Vision:
Vision Metron 4D Flat M.A.S. J Bend
I've linked to the actual source I would intend to buy it from, I've bever heard of "BicycleBuys" but they have it cheapest and in stock.
My reservations are the following:
  • These are actually a bit old, it appears Vision/FSA store no longer sells them in any capacity through their main site, I can only find a handful, mostly out of stock, for not so-reputably vendors scattered across the internet. This is a problem if I want replacement parts for something like a crash or incompatibility.
  • Me, being new to aero bars, doesn't know what offerings will work with the bars like hydration, device mounts, etc. It appears aero bars from sites like Profile Designs, Redshift, etc. sell many options compatible with their aero bars, but I'm not seeing my specific to these.
  • The price of $529 for just aero bars and handlebars is pretty steep, but they are carbon!

The next option I've been considering is the following combination from Profile Design:The total price comes out to $530.96 and I have a stem + hydration (the thought process of getting the Aeria Ultimate Stem is its compatibility with the Hydration). However, as I have no experience with aero bars/tri bars, or Triathalon, I don't actually know how crucial something like that hydration thing of the front would be, and if it would cause any excess instability (I imagine using aero bars on a road bike in the first place will cause instability, but whatever...)


As a third option I could save for a Tri-bike, the problem is, I spent a lot of $$$$ on my current bike, which has disc brake, full carbon, Aeolus 5 wheels, which I would want to use on the tri-bike instead of its stock wheels. I would also need a power meter and a fit, so (as a couple of examples) If I were to get the new Cervelo P-Series bike with 105, or the Quintana Roo PR4 Disc, I would be able to pay the least for the frame/groupset and swap my nicer wheels on. With the aforementioned bike fit and power-meter, buying and outfitting yet another bike easily crosses into the 5k territory, which isn't impossible, but I could really go for a summer without living on Ramen Noodles.

So, I've been meaning to write this post for months, in the end, I would really like a bike with Aerobars, a power meter, my sweet disc brake wheelset, and a very expensive fit (probably in the $250-$300 area) for the best-valued price point. If you have any thoughts on the above, opinions, insights, or other options, please feel free to post them!
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Old 01-06-20, 10:37 AM
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I don't think you're going to find one solution that's perfect for both long-distance and TT/Ironman. I do a lot of long-distance, and everyone I know, including several RAAM finishers, just attaches clip-on's to their race bike. Something like that DRV/AEROa (or any handlebar with a 31.8 diameter attachment point) and a Supersonic Ergo 35c would work well for the 12/24 hour races. You won't need a low-rise stem or integrated handlebar hydration for those races. https://www.bikeforums.net/long-dist...endurance.html

I also have several ironman friends who all have triathlon bikes and tell me it makes a big difference in speed and something about the geometry saves their legs for the run. It's only about 6 hours on the bike so comfort isn't as important as an ultra-distance race. I was only kind of paying attention since I have no interest in ever attempting an Ironman myself. I don't know anyone who does both ultra-distance and Ironman in the same season. They both require a lot of training to be fast and it's not the same. Check out the GLR schedule if you want to try some long rides with us next season. We have a few super-fast guys.
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Old 01-06-20, 10:55 AM
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Originally Posted by kingston View Post
I don't think you're going to find one solution that's perfect for both long-distance and TT/Ironman. I do a lot of long-distance, and everyone I know, including several RAAM finishers, just attaches clip-on's to their race bike. Something like that DRV/AEROa (or any handlebar with a 31.8 diameter attachment point) and a Supersonic Ergo 35c would work well for the 12/24 hour races. You won't need a low-rise stem or integrated handlebar hydration for those races. https://www.bikeforums.net/long-dist...endurance.html

I also have several ironman friends who all have triathlon bikes and tell me it makes a big difference in speed and something about the geometry saves their legs for the run. It's only about 6 hours on the bike so comfort isn't as important as an ultra-distance race. I was only kind of paying attention since I have no interest in ever attempting an Ironman myself. I don't know anyone who does both ultra-distance and Ironman in the same season. They both require a lot of training to be fast and it's not the same. Check out the GLR schedule if you want to try some long rides with us next season. We have a few super-fast guys.
Solid perspective and great advice, much appreciated!
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Old 01-06-20, 09:07 PM
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Coincidentally I've been trying clip-on aero bars on my '89 Centurion Ironman. The old school Scott aero bars were sheer torture, no way to make those fit.

I just tried a set of Profile Carbon Stryke, from a TT/tri bike with cracked frame that I'm stripping for parts. MUCH better. Even without a proper contemporary TT/tri bike geometry and fit, it's a huge improvement. I just raised the seat post/saddle about 3/4", put on a Cobb V-FLow and scooted the saddle as far forward as it would go on the original seat post (really needs a zero setback or other proper seat post).

Did an hour on the indoor trainer, then ventured outdoors for a 20 mile test ride. Only did a couple of minutes at a time on the aero bars, mostly flat sections including some moderate descents and climbs. My balance needs work but I can see why some folks like these for long distance rides, even if they aren't doing time trials.

And I could use slightly longer bar extensions. The Profile extensions weren't quite long enough to let me park my arms closer to the elbow on the arm rests, and get full extension of my forearms. No big deal on my short test ride, but I'd prefer a better fit for longer distance.

On the negative side:
  • The balance is terrible. No way around that even with lightweight aero bars. I won't be carving any curves at high speed in the wind.
  • You may need much wider regular drops or bullhorns. I prefer 40cm drops and the comfortable Profile armrests prevent riding the tops, hinder the hoods, but the drops are okay. I'd need either 44cm drops, or bullhorns which set much lower but offer only a single hand position which would get tiresome over long distance.
  • It takes a different approach. I needed less power to get the same speed, but found it difficult to generate more power and go faster. Probably just takes practice, and a proper fit would help. Or just get a TT/tri bike that's already set up for this.
If you decide to stick with drops it'd probably be better to switch to aluminum drop bars and not worry about crushing the carbon fiber bars. FSA Omega compact drops are cheap and good. I might try a set of Gossamer too, which have a slightly flattened top.

If I stick with a hybrid road/TT setup I may switch to the Dura Ace bar end shifters that came with the TT/tri bike on the Profile Carbon Stryke aero bar. Not sure I'll keep this setup on the Ironman, it was just an experiment to see if I could tolerate it at all.
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Old 01-06-20, 11:06 PM
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BTW, if you're not absolute sure about committing much money to an aero bar setup, check craigslist and used ads for used TT/tri-bikes. For some reason these seem to go for cheaper asking prices than comparable road bikes. My best guess is one or both of two possibilities:
  • People dabble in triathlons, decide it's not for them or life stuff gets in the way and they sell good bikes very cheaply.
  • They're diehard tri-folk with good income and get upgrade fever every year or two while they're making progress or nths of second of a personal best or placing in a race.

Or, in my case, the seller finds a minor crack in the frame and dumps the bike for less than the cost of the components priced separately. So I got a decent set of Profile bars, a mish-mash of Dura Ace and Ultegra components and a few other goodies.
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Old 01-07-20, 07:37 AM
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Originally Posted by canklecat View Post
BTW, if you're not absolute sure about committing much money to an aero bar setup, check craigslist and used ads for used TT/tri-bikes. For some reason these seem to go for cheaper asking prices than comparable road bikes. My best guess is one or both of two possibilities:
  • People dabble in triathlons, decide it's not for them or life stuff gets in the way and they sell good bikes very cheaply.
  • They're diehard tri-folk with good income and get upgrade fever every year or two while they're making progress or nths of second of a personal best or placing in a race.

Or, in my case, the seller finds a minor crack in the frame and dumps the bike for less than the cost of the components priced separately. So I got a decent set of Profile bars, a mish-mash of Dura Ace and Ultegra components and a few other goodies.
I've been considering this approach, my concerns are the fact I would really like to get a disc brake compatible bike so I could swap in my current $$$$ carbon wheelset, unfortunately, all the disc brake ones I've found have been far too expensive as it's still such a new market. The other concern is a power meter, I would probably want to stick another FSA Powerbox on it, but those retail for around $600 (yes, I'm kicking myself for not just buying favero assomas).

However, I do have a heavy DT Swiss wheelset with a powertap G3 in it, if I decided to forget about the wheels I could buy a cheap rim-brake tri bike and throw my skinny wheels on it...
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Old 01-07-20, 09:34 AM
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Originally Posted by canklecat View Post
BTW, if you're not absolute sure about committing much money to an aero bar setup, check craigslist and used ads for used TT/tri-bikes. For some reason these seem to go for cheaper asking prices than comparable road bikes. My best guess is one or both of two possibilities:
  • People dabble in triathlons, decide it's not for them or life stuff gets in the way and they sell good bikes very cheaply.
  • They're diehard tri-folk with good income and get upgrade fever every year or two while they're making progress or nths of second of a personal best or placing in a race.

Or, in my case, the seller finds a minor crack in the frame and dumps the bike for less than the cost of the components priced separately. So I got a decent set of Profile bars, a mish-mash of Dura Ace and Ultegra components and a few other goodies.
There's a whole lot that factors into that.

1) Just like bike booms, there was a tri boom about a decade ago, and then a steady slump through now. This most affected local short-distance races, so there are a lot of casual folks who stopped racing, whether they drove the slump or gave it up when their favorite race disappeared.
2) Tri geek gearheads make the upgradeitis of roadies look amateur. In a similar thread I related the story of one of my local buddies who was so smitten with the Zipp 858s that he sold his one-year-old 808s for them. Yes, he's a dentist.
3) The cost of a nice tri bike is roughly equal to the all-in price of an Ironman (counting entry, travel, hotel, etc), so in a sense it's not absurd to show up with the newest, fastest bike you can (and the bike actually matters in this sport).
4) Most tri geeks like riding best anyway, so a non-trivial number convert to roadie-dom over time.

That all said, there's not as much difference between a good tri bike and the best tri bike as the manufacturers would like you to believe, and there is a world of difference between a tri bike and a converted roadie. If you're serious about this, I'd strongly recommend a used P2 (the "New" model, which I think debuted in 2014), or a felt IAx, Trek Speed Concept 7, or a few others of the common and sensible variety, with TriRig Omega brakes, Hed Jet wheels, and Di2 if you can afford it (shifting from the brakes is amazing). That setup will give up basically no speed to the top-end superbikes for a lot less (and with an upgraded aerobar, can equal them). Disc brakes in tri, roadie debate aside, is absolutely meaningless on almost all courses in the world.

And on a tri bike, fit is even more critical than on a road bike, and even less intuitive. In Cervelo, I ride a 56 road and 51 tri, and inn Quintana Roo sizing I'm a 48. Others ride the same numbered size in both, so there's no rule to follow.

As for clip-ons, I was never able to get those to feel right (possibly because of that frame size disparity). And while clip-ons can give you a bit of speed on the flat, what they can't do is change your seat tube angle to the steeper one that allows you to ride with a flat back while keeping your hip angle open enough to run well afterwards. That becomes more and more important as the distances increase as well.
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Old 01-07-20, 10:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Bah Humbug View Post
...As for clip-ons, I was never able to get those to feel right (possibly because of that frame size disparity). And while clip-ons can give you a bit of speed on the flat, what they can't do is change your seat tube angle to the steeper one that allows you to ride with a flat back while keeping your hip angle open enough to run well afterwards. That becomes more and more important as the distances increase as well.
Yup, I've ridden a proper TT/tri bike only once and could tell immediately why riders use that very different style. To get a comparable position on my old road bike I had to scoot onto the saddle nose, even after adjusting it as far forward as it would go. And the rest of the ride was a battle between using a high enough gear and mashing hard enough to keep the saddle from crushing my bits, and trying not to cook my quads. I had to keep reminding myself to adopt a sort of "running" type stance and to "play piano" with my fingers to remind myself to not keep a death grip on the bars. In my handlebar video I could see myself wiggling my fingers occasionally as an unconscious reminder to stay relaxed. Interesting experience.

I could probably adapt, but as you've noted, I could probably pick up a decent TT/tri bike for about what it would cost to cobble together a hybridized road/TT bike.

I also reviewed several videos of the late 1980s-early '90s Tour de France when they were just beginning to adopt aero bars, and it was obviously an awkward transition for many pros. While Greg LeMond looked remarkably smooth and confident during the final stage 1989 time trial, he seemed less comfortable the next year and was often on the hoods, standing to stomp the pedals and maintain momentum. But it was a very different route than the '89 final time trial. Chiapoucci didn't use aero bars or anything other than a stock road bike and lost time badly in that final time trial.

By the early 2000s it was very different. Everyone using purpose made TT bikes, and looking reasonably comfortable on them. Coincidentally, while browsing lots of TT stages I happened to watch a time trial with Floyd Landis. He was remarkably smooth and strong in time trials and looked much more "married" to the TT bike than most of his opponents. I'd never paid much attention to Landis and there aren't many videos of him compared with others. But he was pretty darned good and had that massive lower back and hips common to many strong cyclists like Merckx, disproportionate to the rest of his body. Even without the taint of PEDs Landis would have done well in many stages.

Anyway, pardon the digression. If I get serious about trying some time trials I might just snag a good used TT bike. But I'll keep riding my road bike with the Profile clip-ons for awhile just to see how it goes. I was immediately more comfortable with the Profile bars than the old Scott bars. No wonder the 1980s-'90s riders seemed uncertain on the Scott and similar bars -- the ergonomics were awful.
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Old 01-07-20, 11:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Bah Humbug View Post
There's a whole lot that factors into that.
Disc brakes in tri, roadie debate aside, is absolutely meaningless on almost all courses in the world.
My thought process here was I already have 1 year old Bontrager Aeolus 5 (50mm deep carbon wheels) that cost around $1200. These are disc brake-specific wheels, if I found a reasonably priced value level tri bike that came with 105 Shimano and some stock alloy wheels I could easily switch them out and have a very fast bike. I'm 100% not arguing that there's any disc brake specific need for Tri, I just feel like it would be a tremendous waste if I got a used P2 and had to use the stock wheels that came with it...
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Old 01-07-20, 11:52 AM
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Originally Posted by firebird854 View Post
My thought process here was I already have 1 year old Bontrager Aeolus 5 (50mm deep carbon wheels) that cost around $1200. These are disc brake-specific wheels, if I found a reasonably priced value level tri bike that came with 105 Shimano and some stock alloy wheels I could easily switch them out and have a very fast bike. I'm 100% not arguing that there's any disc brake specific need for Tri, I just feel like it would be a tremendous waste if I got a used P2 and had to use the stock wheels that came with it...
Right... I think what I should have made more explicit is that, because disc-brake tri bikes are newer and more expensive, it will likely cost you more, total, to get a disc-brake tri bike ad use those A5s than to get a lightly-used rim-brake model and a set of Jets. There are going to be functionally zero deals on the disc-brake tri bikes, because last year was the first year they were available in any quantity and mostly at the high end. Now, if you are willing to spend more because you really want to use those wheels, then great, but be aware that you're likely going to spend more total to use them than you would for equal speed with a used rim-brake tri bike. I think the cheapest you'll find that's good is a P-Series 105; Felt charges you >$5k to get a disc-brake tri bike. And that Cervelo has TRP Spyres, not nice Ultegra calipers and levers.
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Old 01-07-20, 01:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Bah Humbug View Post
Right... I think what I should have made more explicit is that, because disc-brake tri bikes are newer and more expensive, it will likely cost you more, total, to get a disc-brake tri bike ad use those A5s than to get a lightly-used rim-brake model and a set of Jets. There are going to be functionally zero deals on the disc-brake tri bikes, because last year was the first year they were available in any quantity and mostly at the high end. Now, if you are willing to spend more because you really want to use those wheels, then great, but be aware that you're likely going to spend more total to use them than you would for equal speed with a used rim-brake tri bike. I think the cheapest you'll find that's good is a P-Series 105; Felt charges you >$5k to get a disc-brake tri bike. And that Cervelo has TRP Spyres, not nice Ultegra calipers and levers.
Ah, I see your point, Hmm, I'll check some local listings and do some math.
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Old 01-07-20, 07:54 PM
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Everyone I know who's serious has separate road and Tri/TT bikes. The LD road folks run clip-ons on their road bikes, never Tri/TT bikes, because you have to climb and have many positions. I've been using clip-ons for 20 years or so. My latest iteration has these base brackets:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07D92763N

These brackets put the aero bars below the handlebars, which is a bit more aero, and have flip-up brackets for a bit more room on the tops. I bought this stuff piecemeal so I could get the exact aero bar extension length I wanted. I use my standard road position, works fine for me. I use all alu stuff there, cheaper.

Least expensive thing is probably buy Profile stuff for the road bike and get a used tri bike.
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Old 01-08-20, 07:45 AM
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Nice Link! I really appreciate the feedback.
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Old 01-08-20, 08:34 AM
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I just went through a similar thought exercise for my Cervelo. In the end I bought the RedShift offerings. They still have not arrived in the post.

The dual position seatpost is what really did it for me. Being able to convert from one geometry to the other (Road/Tri) on the fly & as needed seems like it would be useful. The price seemed right for such a capability... We'll see.

As for road bars, standard road bars with the exact same reach, drop, width could be a challenge. But I think more important is overall shape. I've discovered I like a wide flat area between the hoods & the tops. It allows me to be in a more aero (torso down/forarms horizontal) position for longer. Maybe a feature like that could influence your decision?

I'm not a fan of intigrated anything. Modular, (in this case, a seperate bar & stem) allows much more freedom for the end user. And besides...What is the aero penalty of an exposed bolt head on the stem cap plate, anyway? Standard road bars that fit you is the better choice IMO.
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Old 01-08-20, 02:35 PM
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Originally Posted by base2 View Post
I just went through a similar thought exercise for my Cervelo. In the end I bought the RedShift offerings. They still have not arrived in the post.

The dual position seatpost is what really did it for me. Being able to convert from one geometry to the other (Road/Tri) on the fly & as needed seems like it would be useful. The price seemed right for such a capability... We'll see.

As for road bars, standard road bars with the exact same reach, drop, width could be a challenge. But I think more important is overall shape. I've discovered I like a wide flat area between the hoods & the tops. It allows me to be in a more aero (torso down/forarms horizontal) position for longer. Maybe a feature like that could influence your decision?

I'm not a fan of intigrated anything. Modular, (in this case, a seperate bar & stem) allows much more freedom for the end user. And besides...What is the aero penalty of an exposed bolt head on the stem cap plate, anyway? Standard road bars that fit you is the better choice IMO.
I'm really interested to hear your thoughts on the Redshift system as I've been highly considering it. I also agree with many of your points and do feel that more integration can cause more headaches... I'm leaning more toward the profile design approach now, but may get the switching seat-post.
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Old 01-09-20, 10:12 PM
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Pretty much all the TRI guys I know (and oddly enough, I know too many) have moved from TT bikes to aero bikes with Tri bars in the last couple of years. Watching them migrate really stopped my from buying a TT bike for myself. The standard complaints.... they ride hard and handle poorly. I've experimented with clip on bars on an endurance style bike and as much as I could see the gains from the bars, the weight of the bars really, REALLY affected the handling of the bike in a bad way... turned it into a whale.

So... I'd suggest that you start with some reasonably cheap clip ons (obviously with your setup, you're changing the handle bars) and go from there. If the handling still works for you,stick to them for a bit and then decide if you're willing to buy a nicely used TT bike (I'm with you on disks... but one think I really thing a TT bike needs is electronic shifting... having to move hand positions from brakes to down shift seems very dangerous/inconvenient to me).
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Old 01-10-20, 07:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Beach Bob View Post
Pretty much all the TRI guys I know (and oddly enough, I know too many) have moved from TT bikes to aero bikes with Tri bars in the last couple of years. Watching them migrate really stopped my from buying a TT bike for myself. The standard complaints.... they ride hard and handle poorly. I've experimented with clip on bars on an endurance style bike and as much as I could see the gains from the bars, the weight of the bars really, REALLY affected the handling of the bike in a bad way... turned it into a whale.

So... I'd suggest that you start with some reasonably cheap clip ons (obviously with your setup, you're changing the handle bars) and go from there. If the handling still works for you,stick to them for a bit and then decide if you're willing to buy a nicely used TT bike (I'm with you on disks... but one think I really thing a TT bike needs is electronic shifting... having to move hand positions from brakes to down shift seems very dangerous/inconvenient to me).
I agree on the electronic shifting aspect, I've looked into the etap HRD where I could easily place satellite sifters on the extensions. The obvious issue is the price... if I switched to a SRM wireless or DI2 system, got the satalite shifters, switched out stem and bars (maybe even throw on the redshift switch seatpost) and get a fit, I'm looking at around the same price as a Tri-bike... I wish there was truly a cost-effective option without particularly many drawbacks. Solid insight though into the TT-vs clip on bars discussion, I'll definitely take that into consideration.
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Old 01-30-20, 09:05 AM
  #18  
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Originally Posted by firebird854 View Post
I'm really interested to hear your thoughts on the Redshift system as I've been highly considering it. I also agree with many of your points and do feel that more integration can cause more headaches... I'm leaning more toward the profile design approach now, but may get the switching seat-post.
Thus far, I am supremely satisfied with the Redshift system. Easy to set up & adjust. The aluminum seatpost was a bit heavy by my standards, so I promptly cut it about 100mm shorter saving about 2 ounces. I still have 110mm to 115mm of insertion for my fitment. So no worries there.

One thing I did notice when I cut it shorter is that although the outside of the seatpost is round, the inside is oval meaning their extrusion is smartly shaped to not include extra material that is not needed. I thought it was a nice touch. It seems smartly engineered & does what it says easily enough.

The aerobars I chose were the carbon "S"-bend. They seem light enough & each have a cut-out for internal cable routing should you choose to utilize bar end shifters. The elbow pads are very adjustable in their placement & made from a comfortable, firm foam rubber type material covered in a bonded lycra type fabric. They velcro for easy removal/washing.

I don't have much reference for aerobars (hence my other thread), but these seem well enough & really do clip on securely & off easily in seconds like they claim.

Color me impressed.
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Old 01-30-20, 03:47 PM
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Originally Posted by base2 View Post
Thus far, I am supremely satisfied with the Redshift system. Easy to set up & adjust. The aluminum seatpost was a bit heavy by my standards, so I promptly cut it about 100mm shorter saving about 2 ounces. I still have 110mm to 115mm of insertion for my fitment. So no worries there.

One thing I did notice when I cut it shorter is that although the outside of the seatpost is round, the inside is oval meaning their extrusion is smartly shaped to not include extra material that is not needed. I thought it was a nice touch. It seems smartly engineered & does what it says easily enough.

The aerobars I chose were the carbon "S"-bend. They seem light enough & each have a cut-out for internal cable routing should you choose to utilize bar end shifters. The elbow pads are very adjustable in their placement & made from a comfortable, firm foam rubber type material covered in a bonded lycra type fabric. They velcro for easy removal/washing.

I don't have much reference for aerobars (hence my other thread), but these seem well enough & really do clip on securely & off easily in seconds like they claim.

Color me impressed.
I haven't made the typical NBD post yet, buuuuuuuuut I may have dropped 3k+ on the Argon 18 e-117 tri disc cause N+1. Have $300 fit scheduled on Sat and am currently trying to figure out what powermeter to get a la my Crankset PowerMeter Suggestions and Compatibility thread...

Yes, I hate myself... I'll be eating Raman for awhile.
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Old 01-30-20, 03:51 PM
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Originally Posted by firebird854 View Post
Yes, I hate myself... I'll be eating Raman for awhile.

We all do it, sometimes!

I chimed in on that thread a bit. Good luck. When you get that power meter sorted, I'm sure you'll dominate!

--Aaron
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Old 01-31-20, 07:47 AM
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Originally Posted by base2 View Post

We all do it, sometimes!

I chimed in on that thread a bit. Good luck. When you get that power meter sorted, I'm sure you'll dominate!

--Aaron
Thanks!
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