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Would you NOT recommend your bike?

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Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Would you NOT recommend your bike?

Old 03-13-20, 03:31 PM
  #26  
Jno
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Ridley

I don’t know if it counts if it was my brother in law’s bike, but I would NOT recommend a Ridley (Fenix). I only rode it for a couple hours so feel free to disregard but the bike had no compliance at all, and offered no noticeable speed benefit. I have never enjoyed a ride less.
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Old 03-13-20, 03:37 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by Jno View Post
I don’t know if it counts if it was my brother in law’s bike, but I would NOT recommend a Ridley (Fenix). I only rode it for a couple hours so feel free to disregard but the bike had no compliance at all, and offered no noticeable speed benefit. I have never enjoyed a ride less.
I concur. I was issued a Ridley Noah back in the day and couldn't ride it for more than 3 hours without my body aching from the unforgiving ride. Great crit bike, awful road bike.
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Old 03-13-20, 04:10 PM
  #28  
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I always recommend at least hopping on a Softride to see what they're like.
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Old 03-13-20, 06:02 PM
  #29  
big john
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I had a Tesch s-22, new in 1991. Oversized, heavy gauge steel, short wheelbase and steep head tube with straight blade steel fork. 24 pounds or so, would not fit a tire bigger than 23. The most amazing handling bike or motorcycle I've ever ridden. Also, the stiffest, most brutal ride ever. Much more harsh than a CAAD5 I had.

I have a Gunnar which I would recommend for someone looking for a smooth riding steel bike.
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Old 03-14-20, 07:57 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by Jno View Post
I don’t know if it counts if it was my brother in law’s bike, but I would NOT recommend a Ridley (Fenix). I only rode it for a couple hours so feel free to disregard but the bike had no compliance at all, and offered no noticeable speed benefit. I have never enjoyed a ride less.
Originally Posted by Cypress View Post
I concur. I was issued a Ridley Noah back in the day and couldn't ride it for more than 3 hours without my body aching from the unforgiving ride. Great crit bike, awful road bike.
Might be a trait of Ridleys. I demoed a Ridley Dean for part of a season, and found it to have a very jarring ride.. The bike was beautiful, but my Cervelo P3 was much smoother.
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Old 03-14-20, 11:53 AM
  #31  
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I love my road bike.

However, I'm a bit more mixed about my gravel bike - a Blue Prosecco AL (an older version, which was marketed specifically for gravel.) The components are fine - Shimano 105 5800 (nice!) and perfectly functional mech disc brakes. It seems heavy (though given what I paid for it, that is expected.) I'd prefer wider tire clearance for actual gravel. This is probably specific to my tastes, but I'm not a fan of the crazy-high stack.

So, I'd recommend it for someone who wants a reasonably-priced, overbuilt endurance road bike with a fairly upright position with good components and room for 700x32 road tires. Sadly, that person is not me, though I'll keep it for the occasional gravel ride until I can upgrade.
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Old 03-14-20, 08:40 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by Jno View Post
I don’t know if it counts if it was my brother in law’s bike, but I would NOT recommend a Ridley (Fenix). I only rode it for a couple hours so feel free to disregard but the bike had no compliance at all, and offered no noticeable speed benefit. I have never enjoyed a ride less.
I test rode a Ridley Fenix and came away with the same impression.
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Old 03-15-20, 10:27 AM
  #33  
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I would not recommend my bike. it was built to my specifications and I wanted it to be my dream bike. However it was build so that the only tire I can fit on it is a 23mm tire. I would like to have a 25mm or 28mm tire mostly because of the terrible deterioration of my roads and the change in philosophy as it apples to wider tires and rolling resistance. No. I would not recommend my bike.
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Old 03-19-20, 06:23 AM
  #34  
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I retuned my old bikes from the 1980's and it wasn't worth it. Just the odd brake, tire and various other spare part sizes and specs made it more expensive and difficult to find and the bikes themselves are heavy dogs to ride that won't get out of their way. It was well over $200 to tune one of them and get it going, far more than it would have been for a newer bike.

I paid about $700 sales tax and all fees out the door for a $950 Salsa Journeman flat bar at a year end closeout sale recently. That bike is so much better in so many ways and encourages me to ride more than my old rust buckets. And going forward the expense of keeping it on the road will be less it will pay for itself in not that many years. Also if you ride a lot a higher quality bike will last longer and need less money for repairs to keep it on the road (caliper vs disc brakes etc).

It's just like a car, there's a point that an old rust bucket becomes so aggravating and expensive that it's just cheaper to buy a new(er) vehicle. All bets are off if you have to park outside. Then an old junker is better as it's less likely to get stolen!

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Old 03-19-20, 08:28 AM
  #35  
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As a follow up especially after having tried and loved new 2019 model bike and seen how much better it was than my 1980's vintage bikes the thought came to my mind is that there is no such thing as a bad bike.

Maybe as others have said a highly specialized, custom build bike that is really good at one thing but comes with various pitfalls might not be recommended but that goes with everything that is so angular, limited in appeal, expensive and focused. As a whole, I think most modern general purpose road, gravel or hybrid bikes are so amazingly good even starting at the lower price ranges that it's hard to go wrong no matter what you buy.
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Old 03-19-20, 12:26 PM
  #36  
RedBullFiXX
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I've had my Canyon Ultimate over 3 years now, quite an investment
in kit, but it's working out great
Every ride is more enjoyable than the last
Just keep falling in love with it
Perfect machine for me

Rode in driving rain up in Solvang last weekend, and the ride on TL, and disk brakes is unreal
Very confidence inspiring
Size small, 6.7kg

Last edited by RedBullFiXX; 03-19-20 at 01:03 PM.
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Old 03-19-20, 04:33 PM
  #37  
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I fell out of love with my bike

2016 Felt Z4 Disc- it’s okay, but just okay. It’s not as stable as the F75 I replaced, especially at speed. It’s quick release instead of TA and doesn’t feel any smoother despite 25mm rather than 23 and being carbon vs alloy.

It could all be fit (never had a fitting- had a 58 before so got the same size).

I’ve been through a couple of cranks because the crank was “defective”. The first crank on the bike came loose 50 miles in and 7 miles from home- that was an awesome walk. The second crank it happened on the trainer. Felt says no issue with the frame but I think that’s suspect.

so no, I wouldn’t recommend.
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Old 03-19-20, 04:34 PM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by RedBullFiXX View Post
I've had my Canyon Ultimate over 3 years now, quite an investment
in kit, but it's working out great
Every ride is more enjoyable than the last
Just keep falling in love with it
Perfect machine for me

Rode in driving rain up in Solvang last weekend, and the ride on TL, and disk brakes is unreal
Very confidence inspiring
Size small, 6.7kg
nice bike
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Old 03-21-20, 03:02 PM
  #39  
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I have a 2016 trek emonda which I got very very cheap and I built it up from the frame. The bike rides well, but I can't say I've ridden a ton of other bikes to compare it too. The one thing that bugs me though is the wacky trek specific bottom bracket (bb90) and the trek specific seat post/mast which must have infinitesimally small performance gains but I'm concerned that in 5 or 10 years these parts will no longer be available or hard to get.
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Old 03-21-20, 06:15 PM
  #40  
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My first bike 3 years ago, even less of a clue of what I was doing than even now. A Specialized Diverge A1 (entry level), it was fairly comfortable but heavy, 25 lbs. It's not terrible by any means and I've ridden it probably 1400 mi. It's still my poor weather and gravel bike. I would not recommend, it had claris derailleurs which for most setupsis are workable, but these were clunky and no matter what we did, gear 4 slipped. It had FSA cranks which were a real PIA to find parts for. I couldn't take it anymore so I switched it to a Tiagra groupset. If getting a Diverge which overall is a nice bike, I would get a higher level and not go on the cheap. Or get an entry level that's not faulty, thanks LBS!
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Old 04-09-20, 06:15 PM
  #41  
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I have a Trek Madone, not sure on the model because it isn't in front of me (mostly 105 build), but its not particularly comfortable and the component mix has been an upkeep pain. Came with tires that didn't last long, and have been changed out, brakes have been a chronic frustration in regular upkeep, and the thing seems to find new places to make sounds from somewhat regularly. Definitely don't recommend "lower" level Treks as a result, but also appreciate my experience seems to be the minority.
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Old 04-09-20, 07:55 PM
  #42  
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Not MY bike(s) personally, but I work in a shop so I get to try out a lot of bikes. The worst "real" bike that I've test ridden was a 2009-2011 Scattante aluminum bike. It rode like a board vertically and would twist about an inch and a half each way about the BB. It was like the bike version of celery: If you like it, try any other food. It's much better.
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Old 04-10-20, 03:32 AM
  #43  
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My bike is absolutely awesome for me, but I know a lot of folks wouldn't feel the same. It's a Lynskey R260 titanium bike. Anyone whose tastes lie in the direction of carbon fiber aerowonderbikes wouldn't like it. It's also not the lightest bike, though it's not heavy either, it's just not in the weight weenie class by any stretch of the imagination. I think it's around 21 lbs as currently configured, though I'd have to double-check that. So, at least two classes of people would be very "meh" toward my bike. But it's a great bike for me, since I'm a fairly heavy clydesdale cyclist, and it's strong, durable, has a great Di2 drivetrain and hydraulic disc brakes, great custom-built (by me) wheels, a comfortable Brooks saddle, etc. The hoods are probably only about 50-60mm below the saddle, so not slammed but not upright either. The ride is plush between the titanium and the wide 32mm tires. The wheels are overbuilt for most people with 36 spokes both fore and aft, but are nice, moderately deep-section wide carbon wheels with good quality hubs and were built with so many spokes for strength and durability reasons. In short: a very thin and young cyclist would find my bike to be a heavy, over-built, non-aerodynamic tank, but I find it to be strong, comfortable, smooth, and rides long distances easily, like a Cadillac.
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Old 04-11-20, 08:05 PM
  #44  
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I purchased a Trek Dual Sport to ride when doing trails. It was not very good on the dirt/gravel or pavement so I sold it at a 40% loss. I replaced it with a Cannondale CX bike and it is much better on the dirt/gravel and great on pavement.
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Old 04-14-20, 05:26 PM
  #45  
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My only compliant for my Emonda is the toe overlap with the front tire. I don’t have that issue with the Roubaix but it is pretty severe with the Emonda
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Old 04-18-20, 02:33 PM
  #46  
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I have had bike that I liked at the time, but would not purchase again, if given the chance.

But certain BB give me pause now when looking at new bikes, haha
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