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Wheel Truing Stand

Old 03-31-20, 03:27 PM
  #1  
408mopar
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Wheel Truing Stand

I'm thinking of buying one. I've used a Parks Tool version (I don't know the model no.), and it was nice. Looking at their website, even the Home Mechanic model is $131.95.

Is this one good? https://www.amazon.com/Goplus-Profes...NsaWNrPXRydWU=
I only do my own rims and those of a couple friends. I can imagine it's a bit more delicate than the sturdy Park stand, but I'm not "tough on stuff".
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Old 03-31-20, 03:29 PM
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No experience with linked item but I've used a range varying in price and quality. For random jobs the cheap ones will do (still better than flipping bike upside down) but if you're doing a lot of volume then could be worth the investment to get a nicer one.
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Old 03-31-20, 05:17 PM
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Possible issue I'm seeing is that there doesn't seem to be a way of adjusting for axle width, where the axle goes flips for front vs rear but what size rear. Will it do 142 or 148 both of which are very common today.
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Old 03-31-20, 07:30 PM
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The rather puny "arms" supporting the "feelers" don't inspire confidence in me.
I wonder how true of an arc they swing for different size wheels.
It appears you need a "calibration wheel" to set things.

One problem with single "feeler" stands is they don't detect what's happening on the other brake track.
Depending on HOW you slammed into the curb with your underinflated tire, you still only see one side. You tend to crank on some spokes to compensate and find the opposite side is now even worse.
A 2 feeler stand allows you to see both sides at once and determine (somewhat) if they are bent equally.
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Old 03-31-20, 08:18 PM
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Originally Posted by 408mopar View Post
I'm thinking of buying one. I've used a Parks Tool version (I don't know the model no.), and it was nice. Looking at their website, even the Home Mechanic model is $131.95.

Is this one good? https://www.amazon.com/Goplus-Profes...NsaWNrPXRydWU=
I only do my own rims and those of a couple friends. I can imagine it's a bit more delicate than the sturdy Park stand, but I'm not "tough on stuff".
Do you suppose an old fork off a junk bike, welded to a piece of flat iron would suffice for a truing stand?
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Old 03-31-20, 08:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Jack Ryan View Post
Do you suppose an old fork off a junk bike, welded to a piece of flat iron would suffice for a truing stand?
If long & wide enough, it'll suffice as a wheel holder for a wheel with that specific OLD.
It's the rest of the parts that matter.
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Old 03-31-20, 09:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Russ Roth View Post
Possible issue I'm seeing is that there doesn't seem to be a way of adjusting for axle width, where the axle goes flips for front vs rear but what size rear. Will it do 142 or 148 both of which are very common today.
While 142 and 148 may be common today, they are also likely to be through axle which is a whole kettle of other fish for even expensive truing stands to deal with. Even if the hubs were quick release in that width, itís only 7mm and 13mm difference. 7mm is 1/4Ē while 13 mm is 1/2Ē. The truing stand canít be very stiff given the construction so it should be able to spring the 7mm. 13mm might be a stretch but not by much.

Originally Posted by 408mopar View Post
I'm thinking of buying one. I've used a Parks Tool version (I don't know the model no.), and it was nice. Looking at their website, even the Home Mechanic model is $131.95.

Is this one good? https://www.amazon.com/Goplus-Profes...NsaWNrPXRydWU=
I only do my own rims and those of a couple friends. I can imagine it's a bit more delicate than the sturdy Park stand, but I'm not "tough on stuff".
I built many wheels with a Minoura truing stand like this one. It harder to work with than a Park truing stand but it does work. The one you are looking at looks a little flimsier but not by much. Youíll need a dishing tool or just turn the wheel around to check dish but itís workable.
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Old 03-31-20, 09:57 PM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
While 142 and 148 may be common today, they are also likely to be through axle which is a whole kettle of other fish for even expensive truing stands to deal with. Even if the hubs were quick release in that width, itís only 7mm and 13mm difference. 7mm is 1/4Ē while 13 mm is 1/2Ē. The truing stand canít be very stiff given the construction so it should be able to spring the 7mm. 13mm might be a stretch but not by much.

I built many wheels with a Minoura truing stand like this one. It harder to work with than a Park truing stand but it does work. The one you are looking at looks a little flimsier but not by much. Youíll need a dishing tool or just turn the wheel around to check dish but itís workable.
Thru axle really isn't a big deal for a decent truing stand to deal with, just need some form of adapter though I've had no trouble building thru-axle wheels using the axle from the bike, a cheaper stand might require some form of QR conversion item but the bigger concern is fitting the wheel.

A stand I'm someone willing to recommend is this one https://www.amazon.com/Minoura-Porta...g%2C160&sr=1-3
I bought one of these about 25years ago and learned to build wheels with it, it will make the job harder then a real pro stand but I think will do better then the one you asked about for not a lot more money. I still will toss mine in the car if I'm doing some form of neutral support as it does work well for doing a quick true or spoke replacement truing; this looks like its been updated nicely though its still the workman version.
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Old 03-31-20, 10:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Russ Roth View Post
Thru axle really isn't a big deal for a decent truing stand to deal with, just need some form of adapter though I've had no trouble building thru-axle wheels using the axle from the bike, a cheaper stand might require some form of QR conversion item but the bigger concern is fitting the wheel.
I havenít had to deal with too many through axles...they just aren't something that show up at my co-op that often. I have used a round adapter for the Park stand and it was a royal pain to use. The through axle doesnít really fit in the stand all that well either. I found a different adapter but havenít had the opportunity to use it yet.

Originally Posted by Russ Roth View Post
A stand I'm someone willing to recommend is this one https://www.amazon.com/Minoura-Porta...g%2C160&sr=1-3
I bought one of these about 25years ago and learned to build wheels with it, it will make the job harder then a real pro stand but I think will do better then the one you asked about for not a lot more money. I still will toss mine in the car if I'm doing some form of neutral support as it does work well for doing a quick true or spoke replacement truing; this looks like its been updated nicely though its still the workman version.
It would do the job with all of the same warts as the one 408Mopar is looking at. It wouldnít do 142mm or 148mm any better than the GoPlus would.
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Old 03-31-20, 11:35 PM
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I have a stand of welded tube and bent flatbar that I paid perhaps $30 almost 40 years ago and a similar construction dishing tool.. Crude and sturdy. Built many good wheels on it. The hardware on it was similarly cheap and I've invest a couple of bucks for better bolts and nut. The far better Parks at the coop are nice but I wouldn't want the size, weight or need for care in my garage. I can put my stand anywhere and it works just fine pulled out years later, even if stuff got piled on it.

I did modify the dishing tool so the gauge is no longer a tube that slides over the axle but now has an offset and "foot" with a slot that slides in place from the side. No longer have to take off the QR or nut. Well worth the work.

The easy to move stand means it is no big deal to build the wheels on the dining room table, in excellent light and with good music. Two steps to the kitchen floor to check dish and stress spokes. Works so well I am in no rush to change anything. If someone offers me a Park, I'd probably pass.

Edit: oh yeah, I could probably modify my simple stand easily to accommodate any axle system anyone ever wants to invent.

Ben
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Old 04-01-20, 09:24 AM
  #11  
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Rather than buy cheap low end tools NEW, I tend to buy nice higher end tools USED.
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Old 04-01-20, 09:37 AM
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Originally Posted by 79pmooney View Post
The easy to move stand means it is no big deal to build the wheels on the dining room table, in excellent light and with good music. Two steps to the kitchen floor to check dish and stress spokes. Works so well I am in no rush to change anything. If someone offers me a Park, I'd probably pass.

Edit: oh yeah, I could probably modify my simple stand easily to accommodate any axle system anyone ever wants to invent.
Ben
don't have a kitchen table, just the dining room and don't find it hard to move anywhere with the base. Also picked it up off Amazon warehouse deals for 125.00 with a damaged box, the box went into the garbage just as well as any other so I don't know why they dropped the price so low. Seem like one goes on there every other month, the base was extra. Plus side is the base holds oil, all the spoke wrenches, extra nipples and spoke prep while keeping the table free if drippings from oiling the nipples.
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Old 04-01-20, 11:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Russ Roth View Post
don't have a kitchen table, just the dining room and don't find it hard to move anywhere with the base. Also picked it up off Amazon warehouse deals for 125.00 with a damaged box, the box went into the garbage just as well as any other so I don't know why they dropped the price so low. Seem like one goes on there every other month, the base was extra. Plus side is the base holds oil, all the spoke wrenches, extra nipples and spoke prep while keeping the table free if drippings from oiling the nipples.
Much, much nicer than mine! But also a lot bigger to store.

OIl? I am not sure I've ever oiled spoke threads. Been using Phil green since the dark ages and moved to marine grease 15-20 years ago. Love that with marine grease. The nipples turn years later, even if the wheel has been through salt. (Really easy to use also. I pick up a bunch of spokes, even the ends on the table, dip the bunch about 2/3s of the threads into the grease, roll the bunch in my hands to even the grease out and done. Rim holes get daubed with a cotton swap. No mess, no drip. Fast.

Ben
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Old 04-01-20, 11:57 AM
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Originally Posted by 408mopar View Post
I'm thinking of buying one. I've used a Parks Tool version (I don't know the model no.), and it was nice. Looking at their website, even the Home Mechanic model is $131.95.

Is this one good? https://www.amazon.com/Goplus-Profes...NsaWNrPXRydWU=
I only do my own rims and those of a couple friends. I can imagine it's a bit more delicate than the sturdy Park stand, but I'm not "tough on stuff".
Read the 1 and 2 star reviews.
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Old 04-01-20, 12:24 PM
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I have had the earlier version of this one for over 25 years and it works fine. Get a dishing tool too.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Minoura-FT-...MAAOSwNw1eRLwx
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Old 04-01-20, 12:47 PM
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How many different over locknut configurations will the truing stand handle? Will it handle, for example recumbent trike front wheels?

Those questions aside, all that a wheel truing stand does is to provide a stable place to measure from.
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Old 04-01-20, 12:48 PM
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How many different over locknut configurations will the truing stand handle? Will it handle, for example recumbent trike front wheels?

Those questions aside, all that a wheel truing stand does is to provide a stable place to measure from.
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Old 04-01-20, 12:51 PM
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I've been using this one https://www.performancebike.com/spin...-sd-ts/p914520 for years to true my wheels. I even built two sets with it, and it worked fine. I recently borrowed a friends Park tool stand and found it to be more sturdy, but the main difference is that the calipers are dialed in which allows you to true more finite.
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Old 04-01-20, 12:59 PM
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I'd rather use the bike's frame/fork for truing then a flimsy and wobble prone stand. IMO a solidly held wheel is the ticket.

As mentioned all a stand does is to hold the wheel in a convenient way with easy to adjust indicators. The ability to true a wheel isn't up to the stand. Andy
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Old 04-01-20, 03:42 PM
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This looks like a Park at a lower price: https://www.chainreactioncycles.com/.../rp-prod122322. I had the Minoura like the Sunlite mentioned above, but apparently during one of our moves one of the forks(?) got bent, and I couldn't figure out how to bend it back to the right position.
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Old 04-01-20, 07:13 PM
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The one I linked to does look flimsy. I think I'll look for a while for a used Park Tools version. Using the one I borrowed spoiled me.

Lots of good ideas, thank you all!
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Old 04-02-20, 10:42 AM
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Looks very professional!
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Old 04-02-20, 11:23 AM
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Park stand, the regular or the pro model. Buy once, cry once. They do the job very, very well, last forever and are a pleasure to use. Even when I worked in bike shops in my younger days my stand at home was an old Schwinn ten speed fork from a junked bike from one of the shops. I drilled it out and installed hex cap screws and put plastic tips on them. Worked ok in a pinch but most of the time I waited to get to work to use the Park Pro. When I could financially swing buying my own I bought a Park Pro. Have never regretted it.

If you can find one though, the old VAR Pro model was awesome! You see those once in a while on eBay. Not as easy to use as a Park but more precision for delicate and fine tuning. However, even used and 50 years old they don't come cheap. The new VAR Pro looks a lot like the Park Pro.


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Old 04-03-20, 01:02 AM
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drlogik, I agree with you on the truing stand. Bought a Park 30 years ago and have never been disappointed. No need for dishing tool as the indicators are perfectly centered and have never needed adjustment. Pro-grade tools are simply a joy to use.
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Old 04-03-20, 05:59 AM
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I prefer precise efficiency. The Navy taught me how to work smart and save $. Back in the day of an underfunded military and non-compete rip off vendors, we spent our quarterly budget in the first week.

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