Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Touring
Reload this Page >

Tires and fixing flats on unsupported rides

Notices
Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Tires and fixing flats on unsupported rides

Old 11-12-20, 08:59 PM
  #51  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 11,230
Mentioned: 30 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1959 Post(s)
Liked 432 Times in 368 Posts
Originally Posted by downtube42 View Post
BITD, but not anymore.

We have only theory suggesting it did any good. Like many things cycling, mythology and lore prevail over data driven conclusions
I have very clear evidence of stopping after running over glass, laying my touring bike on its side, and dislodging a just started too embed itself piece of glass from my tire.
tons of times
so while I've never done the reach down and clean off tire with glove thing, my stationary thing is doing the same thing, just slower.
djb is offline  
Old 11-12-20, 09:21 PM
  #52  
Jonathan Hanson 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 69
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by downtube42 View Post
I don't see the story of flying debris landing sharp side up as statistically convincing. Cool story, nice image, but not data.

I think I've had more rear flats than front, but that could be just because they are more annoying to fix on the road thus more memorable. I have no data, and even if i did that's only one person and really just another story.

Stories are cool, and even convincing, but not because they are correct. Good data and good statistical analysis is boring AF, often not convincing to the general public, and more often actually correct.
Er, well . . . I didn't intend my post to be a scientific challenge, but as it happens I've taught (4x4) tire repair to several hundred people at the Overland Expos over the years, and have written a score or more articles on the subject, and engineers at several tire companies confirmed the phenomenon. So not actually just "one person's cool story." If you choose not to believe it it's of course your choice.
Jonathan Hanson is offline  
Old 11-12-20, 09:52 PM
  #53  
boomhauer
Senior Member
 
boomhauer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 734
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 204 Post(s)
Liked 25 Times in 17 Posts
or you could buy a pair of Mr. Tuffy's tire liners and never worry about it again.
boomhauer is offline  
Old 11-13-20, 05:53 AM
  #54  
staehpj1 
Senior Member
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Posts: 9,843
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 440 Post(s)
Liked 97 Times in 77 Posts
Originally Posted by downtube42 View Post
BITD, but not anymore.

We have only theory suggesting it did any good. Like many things cycling, mythology and lore prevail over data driven conclusions
Just as well since IME in the realm of cycling forums many of the data driven ones seem to use flawed logic and misinterpreted data any way.
__________________
Check out my profile, articles, and trip journals at:
https://www.crazyguyonabike.com/staehpj1
staehpj1 is offline  
Old 11-13-20, 06:44 AM
  #55  
cubewheels
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Manila, Philippines
Posts: 1,524

Bikes: A really old BMX bike, Phantom 20 kid's MTB, Jackal Mio Gravel Bike

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 671 Post(s)
Liked 286 Times in 229 Posts
Originally Posted by SoobyDoo View Post
Whats the best strategy? Use a tire with flat protection that I will have to wrestle with and use the jack if I get a flat? Or use a tire that I can mount by hand, but will probably have less flat protection and one that will likely result in more flats?
Most tires, I was able to remove and install by hand, no levers. I have small, slender, lady-like hands.

Indeed, the hardest tire to remove and install for me was the Panaracer Ribmo with flat protection. The tire was somehow infamous in the net reviews for being very difficult to remove and install.

However, I was able to install and out of curiousity, remove the new Panaracer Ribmos using just one piece of cheap generic plastic lever. I haven't used the Ribmos long enough to see how resistant it is from flats. I bought 35mm wide ones for mostly road use with occassional and very short rides over gravel. Tread design is a grooved slick, not the best tire to use on gravel but seems ok.

I think the key to easy removal and install of tire is make sure to deflate the innertube as thoroughly as you can.
cubewheels is online now  
Old 11-13-20, 07:25 AM
  #56  
harvillo
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 16
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Iíve struggled with this as well. I opt for a tire which mounts easily, period. For instance, I love contis, but they are a pita with my wheels so I went with a tire thatís nice (but not as nice) yet a breeze to mount. If it takes more than 5 minutes to have a tire off then Iím over it. Iíve also had great luck with wheel liners. In fact, I canít remember ever having a puncture when using them (other than the giant piece of metal that went into my sidewall) which looked to be something used in road construction.
harvillo is offline  
Likes For harvillo:
Old 11-13-20, 07:48 AM
  #57  
CargoDane
Not a newbie to cycling
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Posts: 911

Bikes: Omnium Cargo Ti with Rohloff, Bullitt Milk Plus, Dahon Smooth Hound

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 356 Post(s)
Liked 319 Times in 197 Posts
I recently bought a Schwalbe Billy Bonkers (20"). I was shocked how easy it was. In fact, it was so "loose" that I thought I had received the wrong 20" (i.e. the larger 20"). I have to admit, that I would have preferred a bit tighter fit out of slight fear of (a lack of) retention at lower pressures. I mean, I don't even need a lever to take off the deflated tyre.
CargoDane is offline  
Old 11-13-20, 08:55 AM
  #58  
pdlamb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: northern Deep South
Posts: 6,485

Bikes: Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee

Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1433 Post(s)
Liked 539 Times in 364 Posts
Originally Posted by staehpj1 View Post
Just as well since IME in the realm of cycling forums many of the data driven ones seem to use flawed logic and misinterpreted data any way.
But but but...

Aren't three anecdotes equivalent to five data points??

pdlamb is online now  
Likes For pdlamb:
Old 11-13-20, 09:14 AM
  #59  
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Montreal Canada
Posts: 11,230
Mentioned: 30 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1959 Post(s)
Liked 432 Times in 368 Posts
Originally Posted by pdlamb View Post
But but but...

Aren't three anecdotes equivalent to five data points??

and apparently nowadays, seven easily disseminated heresays are more than equal to both. Social Media and all ya know. Add in repetition and you're golden.
djb is offline  
Likes For djb:
Old 11-13-20, 01:46 PM
  #60  
andrewclaus
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Golden, CO
Posts: 1,994

Bikes: 2016 Fuji Tread

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 393 Post(s)
Liked 139 Times in 108 Posts
Originally Posted by pdlamb View Post
But but but...

Aren't three anecdotes equivalent to five data points??

Mathematically, yes. Grammatically, I've heard "The plural of 'anecdote' is 'data.'"
andrewclaus is offline  
Likes For andrewclaus:
Old 11-13-20, 04:54 PM
  #61  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 23,581

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 119 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3895 Post(s)
Liked 1,323 Times in 819 Posts
Originally Posted by Doug64 View Post
We have something similar here in the U.S; it is the seed of Puncture Vine, also known as a "bullhead".
Goathead. Aka Tribulus terrestris. Around here we call them tackburrs as well. Nasty little buggers. They grow in disturbed soils but donít like competition. As soon as grass grows over the disturbed ground, they go dormant and call lay fallow for up to 50 years and still germinate. They probably came here in Russian wheat.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 11-13-20, 05:39 PM
  #62  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 23,581

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 119 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3895 Post(s)
Liked 1,323 Times in 819 Posts
Originally Posted by Doug64 View Post
David, The reason you haven't got any flats on a tour is we somehow got your share. On one long tour we got 13 of them. I'd be more than glad to give your share back
Amateur! Some of the highlights of my travails with the mighty gods of flats:

-to begin with, I have gone through 2 boxes (100 each) of Rema patches, and am well into my 3 box, in the last 10 years.

-I started out the morning with a flat that I had to patch before I broke camp. I got less than 10 feet down the road with a loaded bike when I heard the pop of another puncture.

-3 or 4 blowouts in 26 miles. The first one was just 2 miles from the start in front of a car tire shop...scared the guy outside. One stampeded cows but at least I’d made it about 20 miles and the last one was overnight during a torrential rain storm with lightning so close that I could hear the thunder before I saw the lightning. There may have been another one in there somewhere. Spent the night in the brick bathroom of the campground. I was prepared for flats but not for that many blowouts. Someone was nice enough to give me a ride to town where I got 6 tubes and didn’t have a flat over the next two weeks.

-A blowout on the top of Lolo Pass after I fixed a flat on my daughter’s bike. 50 miles from anywhere. (Both of these incidents happened with Continental touring tires which I will not use again)

-a day trip into goathead country here in Colorado. We had 4 people and 24 flats. My wife got one...I forgot a tire liner one of her tires..., the guy running ghetto tubeless got 3 and his girlfriend got 20. Again, I plan for flats and bring extra tubes as well as lots and lots (and lots) of patches. She blew through all of them and more. She finally had to resort to pumping up the tire and riding as fast as she could to cover as much distance as possible before having to pump up again. It was a slow final 3 miles (out of 8 total). When we got to the trailhead, I did a little happy dance because if you do the math, you discover that I had zero flats.

-which brings me to the sad moral of the next ride into the same area. Because I had mocked the mighty god of flats and his goathead attendants, they did smiteth me mightily! In the same 8 miles, I stopped counting at 63 goathead punctures on one tire! I had to actually carry the bike the last mile because the tires came off the rims. I had to throw away the tires, tubes and tire liner. There were just too many goatheads and goathead spines imbedded in all of them.

The mighty god of flats and his goathead attendants can be appeased, however. I have since gone into the same area with Slime filled tubes, tire liners and sacrificial tires...old tires I will just throw away after the ride... and not experienced a single flat nor even picking up a single goathead. If you are willing to ride on awful tires that weight a ton and aren’t all that responsive, the mighty god of flats might be appeased.

On the plus side, I’m really, really, really good at fixing flats!
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Likes For cyccommute:
Old 11-14-20, 07:39 AM
  #63  
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 7,752

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad MkII, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, Perfekt 3 Speed -age unknown, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2075 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 389 Times in 328 Posts
A couple years ago I did the ACA Big Bend van supported trip in West Texas. Second night, I accidentally rode my bike into the campsite instead of getting off the bike while still on pavement and walking into the campsite. Spent the next 10 minutes removing the thorns that I collected in the campsite, photo below.



I was more careful for the rest of the trip.

The group was over a dozen riders, and there was only one person that had a flat, and she only had one.

I was amazed how lucky we all were.

Before the trip, we were warned to expect flats on our sleeping pads too, I do not know if anyone had a pad puncture, I did not. They suggested a foam pad underneath any inflatable pads, some people did that but I did not, instead I rolled the dice that I could pick a good tent site each night. I had a plastic sheet under my tent, that collected some thorns.

Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Amateur! Some of the highlights of my travails with the mighty gods of flats:

-to begin with, I have gone through 2 boxes (100 each) of Rema patches, and am well into my 3 box, in the last 10 years.
...
I need to also thank you for having some of my flats for me, made my touring much more enjoyable. If I meet you in a campground sometime, remind me that I owe you a couple beers.
Tourist in MSN is online now  
Likes For Tourist in MSN:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.