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Difference in Size

Old 07-23-18, 09:57 AM
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folgore
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Difference in Size

Good day everybody!

This is my Post 2 so apologies in advance for my lack of experience on the subject.

I am 6'5" and 259 lbs and I am looking at used road bikes. I keep looking at 62cm, 61cm and 60cm. Is the size something you can compromise on or not? for example I have found this Bianchi brand new Carbon bike for $1,000 but it's a 60cm. At 6'5" (6'4.5" exactly...) should I stick to 62cm or can i get down to 60cm?

Thanks for your help, again....
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Old 07-23-18, 10:47 AM
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At 6'5", 62 cm is the minimum, and you might even be better off looking for 64, or even larger frames. I have a friend your height who rides a vintage 68 cm frame.

Not many stock bikes that big. Soma makes a few 66 cm frames. I would start with those.
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Old 07-23-18, 11:34 AM
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I'm also 6'5" and I've been on 61-62cm bikes for years. I don't think a 66cm is necessary and sounds like it would be way too big. Just built a 61cm Cervélo and it's just right. (Maybe I just have odd proportions?)
Go to your LBSs and get some fitment opinions.*
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Old 07-24-18, 04:15 AM
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Another 6’5” club member here. The right answer is......it depends. It depends on your riding style, physical dimensions and any physical restrictions. You would be ok on anything with a top tube of 59cm or longer I think, but you won’t really know what you need until you get out there and get riding.

I’ve been on 3 different road bikes over the years, an Avanti 90s alloy aero bike (59cm TT), a Felt F4 61cm and currently a Canyon Ultimate CFSL 3XL. The Canyon is close to right for me. Ideally I need something even a wee bit longer.

Felt is a great brand for reasonably priced big bikes, and I believe Canyon is now available in the US and they make some of the biggest bikes out there.

Don't just look at frame size numbers as they can be quite misleading at times. Go check out geometry charts and compare REACH and STACK numbers. Don’t stress too much, just understand that more reach means a longer reach to the bars and more stack means a higher handlebar height which would be better to start with
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Old 07-24-18, 07:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Jahnboy9000 View Post
I'm also 6'5" and I've been on 61-62cm bikes for years. I don't think a 66cm is necessary and sounds like it would be way too big. Just built a 61cm Cervélo and it's just right. (Maybe I just have odd proportions?)
Go to your LBSs and get some fitment opinions.*
It depends on how you are built, and how aggressive you want to be on the bike.* If you want an aggressive, bent over position, the smaller bike might work for you.* If you want your handlebars closer to level with your saddle, a larger frame may be the way to go.
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Old 07-24-18, 07:21 AM
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Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
It depends on how you are built, and how aggressive you want to be on the bike.* If you want an aggressive, bent over position, the smaller bike might work for you.* If you want your handlebars closer to level with your saddle, a larger frame may be the way to go.
I guess that is actually pretty true. I go for a pretty aggressive position, and getting even more aggressive with the new bike.
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Old 07-24-18, 07:39 AM
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Thank you all for your inputs. So, I guess since I would like a less aggressive stance, I should focus on the 62cm I am finding and disregard the 59 and 60 bikes.

If I were to buy a Madone instead of a Domane, is there really that much difference in terms of positions? In the pictures they seem pretty similar and the Madone is more frequently found used.
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Old 07-24-18, 09:32 AM
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Originally Posted by folgore View Post
Thank you all for your inputs. So, I guess since I would like a less aggressive stance, I should focus on the 62cm I am finding and disregard the 59 and 60 bikes.

If I were to buy a Madone instead of a Domane, is there really that much difference in terms of positions? In the pictures they seem pretty similar and the Madone is more frequently found used.
the Madone is a racing bike. If you are looking for a more relaxed geometry, look elsewhere.
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Old 07-24-18, 11:57 AM
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Madone came in two Geos pending the yr. H1 and H2. Lower tier grades say $3500 and below were all H2 geos, lightly slacker, taller head tubes, putting the body more upright and easier to stack 30mm of spacer under the stem to make it feel less racey. H1 geo is pure tour de france fit, short head tube, more aggressive geo, larger seat to handlebar drop. Most Cannondale EVO/CAAD10/12 will be along the lines of the H1 geo.

the Domane is even more relaxed version of the H2 geo, with even a taller head tube but most important, it can fit larger tires then a 25c. People are running 28-30c tires easy in the Domane, Cannondale version of this bike is their synapse. For Giant bikes, it would be their Defy models.

https://www.trekbicyclesuperstore.co...a-305255-1.htm comes is 61

if you're more flexable and/or have longer arms, you can get away with the aggressive frame style
https://www.trekbicyclesuperstore.co...5-311248-1.htm comes is 60 and 63
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Old 07-24-18, 01:41 PM
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Yes, I have found a Madone but with the H2 geometry, so I assume it should be doable in terms of position.

Thank you again everyone and let's see what happens!
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Old 07-24-18, 06:39 PM
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Consider that the maximum distance you should have between the top steerer bearing and the bottom of the stem is 40mm for a carbon steerer. With that in mind and a quick look at the figures, you will only ever get as high with the bars on the Madone as what the Domane is with the stem slammed right down on the bearing almost. So the Domane gives you a 36mm higher starting point for stem height right from the beginning. There would be lots of Madones around because the kind of person that tends to ride them is more likely to trade up sooner than a Domane rider.
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Old 07-25-18, 07:47 AM
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I think I understand, thank you again!
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